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                            Mathematical Modeling of Light Utilization and the Effects of Temperature Cycles on Productivity in a Steady-State Algal Photobioreactor
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Utah State University Utah State University

[email protected] [email protected]

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations Graduate Studies

5-2010

Mathematical Modeling of Light Utilization and the Effects of Mathematical Modeling of Light Utilization and the Effects of

Temperature Cycles on Productivity in a Steady-State Algal Temperature Cycles on Productivity in a Steady-State Algal

Photobioreactor Photobioreactor

Peter Edwin Zemke
Utah State University

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665.
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The value of C has been proposed by Tennessen et al. [40] to be equivalent to

the number of PSII sites per unit area. This theory is given merit in that the limiting

reaction in photosynthesis was determined to be the reduction of cytochrome f by PSII

and the molar ratio of cytochrome f to PSII is equal to unity [50,51].

6.4 Experimental Data


In order to compare the model to experimental data, the following parameters must

be available for each combination of parameters: I(z=0), f, , Is or the continuous light

growth curve, or up or productivity, and C or PSII content and cell density. Results

presented by Phillips and Myers [39] contained sufficient information to compare the

model. Further, the results were completely tabulated and cover a wide range of f and ,

from 1.5 – 144 Hz and 5 – 40 %, respectively. This was the primary data used for

evaluating the validity of the relationship. The trends established by the relationship were

also compared to experimental data given by Tennessen et al. [40], Terry [21], and Kok

[38]. Because these researchers did not include all of the data necessary for the model,

the model could not be quantitatively compared.

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CHAPTER 7


TEMPORAL LIGHT DILUTION MODEL DEVELOPMENT



To date, mathematical models relating photosynthetic productivity to temporal

light dilution have been too complex for general engineering design applications. These

relationships took into account a number of variables, such as photoacclimation, that can

be ignored or taken into account by some simpler means. In this chapter, a simpler

relationship is developed that can be used for “first-cut” engineering calculations and to

understand the relationship among the variables.

7.1 Continuous Light Model

Although this chapter’s goal is a model relating productivity to temporal light

dilution, a model relating productivity to continuous light is necessary for describing the

underlying theory, model validation, and determining some of the variables from

experimental data.

To develop this model the following assumptions are made. These assumptions

are numbered as they will be referred to by number in future discussions.

1. An algal culture normal to a light source consists of a homogenously distributed

concentration of photosynthetic units, C, measured in mol of PSU’s per unit area

of light-harvesting pigment (LHP) (this will be discussed later in this section)

(Fig. 7.1).

Page 154

136
Zemke PE, Wood BD, 2006. Hybrid Solar Lighting May Have Another Utility: Solar

Water Heating, Proceedings of the 2006 International Solar Energy Conference,
Denver, CO.


Posters

Zemke PE, Gale JA, 2009. Thermodynamics of a Full-Scale Anaerobic Digestion Process,

2009 Intermountain Graduate Student Symposium, Logan, UT.

Zemke PE, 2004. Solar Hybrid Lighting, 2004 ASME Regional Student Conference,

Denver, CO.

Presentations

Zemke PE, Gale JA, 2009. Upstream Methods of Hydrogen Sulfide Mitigation in

Anaerobic Digesters, 2009 Institute of Biological Engineering Regional
Conference, Logan, UT.


Zemke PE, 2009. A Review of the Design, Operation, and Performance of a Lab-Scale

Vertical Sheet Photobioreactor, 2008 Intermountain Graduate Student
Symposium, Logan, UT.

ADDITIONAL RESEARCH

Sunderland Dairy Anaerobic Digester Retrofit Project, Utah State University (PI: Byard
Wood). Designed biogas collection system and instrumentation, and over-pressure safety
devices. Engineered solution to a design flaw in the effluent heat recovery unit. Collected
and analyzed performance data to evaluate the system. Conducted analysis and made
recommendations for economical operation in winter months.

RELATED SKILLS

Experimental:
Bomb calorimetry
Algal culturing techniques
Biogas handling & sampling
Lipid extraction & gas chromatography
Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV)
Basic machining & carpentry
General laboratory practices

Computer:
CFD (Fluent)
Programming (Fortran, Matlab)
Graphics (Solid Edge)
Office Applications (Microsoft Office,
iWork, Open Office)
Math (Maple, Matlab)

AWARDS AND TITLES

Graduate researcher of the year, Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering,
2008-2009 school year.

Page 155

137
Subject matter expert, 2009 Hill Air Force Base Energy Forum, Biomass session.

Second place, Old Guard Poster Competition, 2004 ASME Regional Student Conference,
Denver, CO.


PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE

Mechanical engineer (short-term contract), Sustainable Energy Systems, Reno, NV – Jan.
– Feb. 2009. Used numerical modeling to incorporate climate and experimental data to
assess the heating requirements for a combined heat and power system at a gold leaching
operation.

Engineering Intern, Aerojet, Clearfield, UT – May – Dec. 2002, May – Aug. 2003, May –
Dec. 2005. Applied structural, dynamic, thermodynamic, and fluid engineering analyses
to liquid rocket system components and subsystems maintenance.


AFFILIATIONS

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2000 - present


REFERENCES

Dr. Byard Wood, Department Head, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Utah State
University, 4130 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322. Phone: (435) 797-2868, Email:
[email protected]

Jody Gale, Extension Agent, Richfield Utah State University Extension, 250 N. Main
Cnty Adm Bldg, Richfield, UT 84701. Phone: (435) 893-0470, Email:
[email protected]

Dr. Ron Sims, Department Head, Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State
University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322. Phone: (435) 797-3156, Email:
[email protected]

Dr. Shaun Dustin, Energy Dynamics Lab, 1695 N Research Parkway, Logan, UT 84341.
Phone: (435) 770-7816, Email: [email protected]

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