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TitleMassage for Therapists: A Guide to Soft Tissue Therapy
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LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages217
Table of Contents
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Document Text Contents
Page 1

Massage for Therapists

Massage for Therapists: A guide to soft tissue therapy , Third edition By Margaret Hollis, Edited by Elisabeth Jones
© 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd ISBN: 978-1-405-15916-6

Page 2

Massage for Therapists
A guide to soft tissue therapy

Third edition

Margaret Hollis

Edited by Elisabeth Jones

A John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Publication

Page 108

Massage to the lower limb 95

stroke your hands fi t together (Fig. 8.4 ) with the
thumb of your outer hand lying alongside the index
fi nger of your inner hand. For each successive stroke
your hands should fi t together in this way as they
come round to the front of the thigh and continue
to the femoral triangle, where overpressure is given
with a slight pause. The next stroke starts in the
same way, but your fi ngers pass behind the malleoli
so that your hands can continue up the medial and
lateral aspects of the limb (Fig. 8.5 ). Your outer
hand should, again, be slightly in advance of your
medial hand and both move more anteriorly at the
junction of the upper and middle third of the thigh
so that they encompass the femoral triangle.

The third stroke starts like the second stroke,
but at the malleoli your fi ngers pass the tendocal-

caneus and proceed up the posterior aspect of the
limb (Fig. 8.6 ) with your outer hand slightly in
front of your inner hand. You will have to extend
your back and lift the patient ’ s limb very slightly
to proceed under the thigh from the back of the
knee. At the upper third of the thigh, your hands
circumnavigate to the front to fi nish at the femoral
triangle. Pressure has to be varied to allow for the
smaller ankle, bulky muscular calf, more bony
knee and bulky muscular thigh. This can be best
controlled by adjusting your foot position and
ensuring your arms start to ‘ reach ’ before your
body moves. You should feel your shoulder girdle
protracting to assist the reaching process. At no
time should you bend either your hips or your
back.

Figure 8.2 Effl eurage continues at the ankle. Note the hands
moulding to the part.

Figure 8.3 Stroke 1 – effl eurage to the front of the leg.

Figure 8.4 The fi nish of an effl eurage stroke at the femoral
triangle.

Figure 8.5 Stroke 2 – effl eurage to the sides of the calf con-
tinues up the sides of the thigh.

Page 109

96 Massage for Therapists

Part s trokes

The thigh can be effl euraged alone if the patterns
of strokes previously described start at the knee and
proceed to the femoral triangle. The posterior
stroke is started by sliding the hands from each side
to underneath the knee.

The knee is effl euraged by crossing your hands
above the patella (Fig. 8.7 ), drawing them back-
wards on each side of it until the heels of your
hands meet below the patella, then turning your
hands to allow your fi ngers to pass behind the knee
over the popliteal fossa.

The leg is effl euraged from the foot or ankle to
the popliteal fossa, following the lines of work for
the whole lower limb.

The foot is effl euraged by starting in one of
the two described ways and fi nishing at the
ankle.

The interosseous spaces are effl euraged using
the sides of your thumbs, meantime supporting
the plantar aspect of the foot with your fi ngers
(Fig. 8.8 ).

The toes are effl euraged by supporting the tip of
each toe on the tip of your middle fi nger, and your
thumbs stroke up (Fig. 8.9 ).

Figure 8.6 Stroke 3 – effl eurage to the back of the calf con-
tinues up the back of the thigh.

Figure 8.7 Start of effl eurage to the knee.

Figure 8.8 Position of the hands for either an effl eurage
stroke or kneading to the interosseous spaces of the foot.

Figure 8.9 Position of the hands for either an effl eurage
stroke or kneading to the toes.

Page 216

Index 205

relaxed hand contact 62–3
repetitive strain injury (RSI) 131
respiratory conditions 136–7
respiratory system 20–1
Rolfi ng 147
rolling

abdominal massage 128
muscle rolling 76–7

upper limb 91
skin rolling 75–6

back massage 110
knee 103

Ross, Araminta 3

sacrospinalis 110, 111
scalp massage 124

patient preparation 119
scapula 110
scar tissue

assessment 51–2
benefi ts of massage 24
desensitisation 137
hypertrophic scars 137
tethering 137

sebaceous glands 8
segment massage 147
self-massage 183–7
self preparation 60, 61
shiatsu 4, 147, 179

applying pressure 187–8
cautions 183
clinical indications 182
contraindications 183
diagnostic methods 180–1
do-in 188
glossary 188–9
history 179–80
makkho-ho 188
oriental medicine 180
physiological effects 183
principles and techniques 181–2
professional development 188
self-massage 183–7
theory 181
tsubos 179, 184, 187–8

shoulder 83–4
sinuses 123
skeleton 8–10
skin

assessment 50–1
sports massage 152

ceruminous glands 8
connective tissues 8

dermal-epidermal junction 7
dermis (corium) 7
disorders 54
epidermis 6–7
fl uid balances 8
function 5–6
hair 7
nails 7
piezo-electricity 8
sebaceous glands 8
subcutaneous adipose layer (superfi cial fascia/

hypodermis) 7
sweat glands (sudoriferous glands) 7–8

skin rolling 75–6
back massage 110
knee 103

skin wringing: abdomen 128
sleep

aromatherapy 172
soap and water 64
SOAP notes 56–8
sociogenic-socieconomic problems 49
soft tissue release (STR) 147
soreness 54
specifi c soft tissue mobilisations (SSTMs) 59, 147–8
specifi c stretch 148
sports massage 148, 151, 153, 159

acupressure 152–3
aims of treatment 151
case study 161–2
clean up 152
conditioning 153–4
contact materials 154, 156, 157, 158, 159
contraindications 151, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158,

159, 160
depth 152
diagnosis 151
duration 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160
full body massage 159–60
history taking 151
ice massage 153
inter-competition 156–7
joint position 152
materials 152
position 151
post-competition 157–8
post-travel 158–9
pre-competition 155–6
psychological effect 154, 155, 158
skin preparation 152
specifi c areas of massage 160
sport specifi c 160
treatment for injuries 154–5

Page 217

206 Index

trigger pointing 153
warm-up and 152, 156

standing positions 60, 61
stress 20, 130–1

occupational 131–2
stroking 68–9

abdomen 127
scalp 124
see also effl eurage

structural integration 147
subcutaneous adipose layer 7
sudoriferous glands 7–8
superfi cial fascia 7
surgery 134–5

reconstructive 137
sweat glands 7–8
Swedish massage 3–4, 143, 148
swellings 55

tapôtement 78–9
beating 80
clapping see clapping
hacking see hacking
pounding 80–1
tapping see tapping
vibrations see vibrations

Tappen, Francis 4
tapping 81

facial massage 122
Taylor, Charles and George 4
tendocalcaneous 102
tendons 10

assessment 53
Thai massage 148
therapeutic touch 148
thigh 96, 97, 100–1, 102–3, 104
thixotrophy 194
thoracolumbar region see back massage
thumb kneading 71–2

lower limb 98, 99–100
upper limb 87–8

tibial muscles 99, 105
ticklish subjects 66
toes 96, 100
Trager 148–9
transverse frictions 77–8
trapezius 117, 118
trauma 134–5
trauma release 195
transcadence massage 149
transverse colon 127
treatment couch 63, 93, 106
treatment planning 45

triceps 85, 86, 89, 90, 91
trigeminal nerve 122
trigger point release 149

sports massage 153
trigger points 14
Tuina 4, 149
tumours 54

upper limb disorders 131
upper limb massage 82

clapping 91–2
effl eurage

part strokes 83–5
whole limb 83

elevating the arm 82–3
hacking 91–2
kneading 85

double-handed alternate kneading 85–6
fi nger kneading 87
single-handed kneading 86–7
thumb kneading 87–8

muscle rolling 91
muscle shaking 91
picking up 88

biceps 89
brachioradialis 89–90
deltoid 88–9
forearm fl exors 89
triceps 89

preparation of patient 82–3
sitting position 82
wringing 90–1

vibrational therapy (VT) 149–50
vibrations 80

abdominal massage 126
facial massage 122–3
scalp 124

viscerogenic problems 48–9
vulnerable patients 37

walk standing 61
water-based lubricants 64
work-related upper limb disorders (WRULDs) 131
wringing 74–5

abdominal massage 128
back massage 111
facial massage 121, 122
gluteal region 114
lower limb 102, 103
upper limb 90–1

zero balancing 150

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