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TitleMark Twain (Lives and Legacies)
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages135
Table of Contents
                            CONTENTS
One: CELEBRITY
Two: TOURIST
Three: NOVELIST
Four: HUMORIST
NOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
INDEX
	A
	B
	C
	D
	E
	F
	G
	H
	I
	J
	K
	L
	M
	N
	O
	P
	R
	S
	T
	U
	V
	W
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

M A R K T W A I N

Page 67

M A R K T WA I N

Three





N O V E L I S T

ALTHOUGH MARK TWAIN’S LITERARY ACTIVITIES EXTENDED FOR SOME
sixty years, from his newspaper apprenticeship in 1851 to his

death in 1910, all seven of his full-length novels appeared in a

twenty-one year period within that long span. His first novel, The
Gilded Age (1873), written in collaboration with Charles Dudley
Warner, was set in the time in which it was written, an era that has

ever since borne the label given it in the book’s title. Almost twenty

years later he returned to the same setting and to some of the same

characters in The American Claimant (1892), another political
satire, while three other novels—The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
(1876), The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), and Pudd’nhead
Wilson (1894)—were set in the antebellum South of his boyhood,
and two were set in an England of the imagined past—historical

in The Prince and the Pauper (1882) and legendary in A Con-
necticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (1889). Twain, however,
never followed a novel within one of these groups with another

5 8

Page 68

from the same group, but over the years of his novel writing he

interleaved them. As a consequence, although the settings place

the novels in three distinct groups, their themes connect them in

different patterns so that, for example, a boyish craving for high

adventure and popular admiration in Tom Sawyer is echoed in
the novel that followed, The Prince and the Pauper; the narrow-
minded mores of village society in Huckleberry Finn are echoed
in the behavior of peasant society in Connecticut Yankee. Twain
was an avid reader of history. He delighted in visualizing the pag­

eantry of the past and mimicking what he imagined to be the dic­

tion of an earlier day. But present in Arthurian or Tudor England,

albeit in armor or tights, were the same men and boys and the

same flawed patterns of social conduct that characterized the life

led in nineteenth-century villages on the banks of the Mississippi.

Irritated by a piece of legislation having to do with the mails, Mark

Twain responded by writing a paper on the issue. It began: “Reader,

suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of

Congress. But I repeat myself.” He never published it. Writing had

served to relieve his exasperation, and publications that were apt to

excite opposition and so require him to devote a good amount of

time to rebuttals had to be reserved for larger game. “Sometimes

my feelings are so hot,” he wrote, “I have to take the pen and put

them on paper to keep them from setting me afire inside; then all

that ink and labor are wasted because I can’t print the result.”1 Still,

the “waste” was not waste but an exercise that conserved the time

and restored the equanimity essential for his authorship.

No American novelist before Twain had been so concerned as

was he with the daily world of American politics. He had strong

N O V E L I S T 5 9

Page 134

business man, 24

publishing, (subscription)


26–28, (trade) 83


fame, 10–11, 13–14, 28–29, 47,


112–114

literary relationships:


Arnold, Matthew, 22–25, 79–


80


Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 15–


16


Howells, William Dean,


passim
Ward, Artemus, 11–13

Red Badge of Courage, 110–
111


historical romances, 71


local color, 112–113


naturalism, 101–104


Southwestern humor, 16–18


utopian novels, 73–74


literary technique:

characterization, 115–116

craftsmanship, 91–95

humor, 95–98

persona (“inspired idiot”),

81, 98

plotting, 31–32, 77

point of view, 66–67


twinning, 81–84

vernacular, 15–16, 72–73


views:


anti-imperialism, 54–57

anti-intellectualism, 79–80


fine arts, 38–39, 42–43

humanity, 70


humorists, 24–25

ministers, 33–35


politics, 60–61

races and foreigners, 38, 50–


54, 81, 84–86

religion, 5, 104–105


women, 33, 86–87


works:


American Claimant, 22, 47,
58, 78–80

“Celebrated Jumping Frog of


Calaveras County,” 16,


18–21, 33, 112

Connecticut Yankee in King

Arthur’s Court, 6, 34, 47,
58, 59, 73–78, 101

“Cure for the Blues,” 91–92

“Encounter with An

Interviewer,” 81–82

“Eve’s Diary,” 94–95

“Fenimore Cooper’s Literary

Offenses,” 92


“First Interview with


Artemus Ward,” 96–97


Following the Equator, 48–54,

106


Gilded Age, 31, 47, 58, 60–63

Huckleberry Finn, 6, 16, 23,


27, 31, 46, 47, 56, 58, 59,

64, 67–70, 72, 81, 87

Innocents Abroad, 8, 23, 30,

36–39, 47, 51

Joan of Arc, 82–83

“King Leopold’s Soliloquy,”


56


Life on the Mississippi, 8, 44–

46, 47, 56, 64

“Man That Corrupted


Hadleyburg,” 103–104


“My First Lie and How I Got


Out of It,” 103


Mysterious Stranger, 6
“Old Times on the Missis­


sippi,” 5, 43–44, 89–91

I N D E X 1 2 5

Page 135

Twain, Mark, works (continued)

“Petition to the Queen of


England,” 99–100


Prince and the Pauper, 47,

58, 59, 61, 70–73

“Private History of A


Campaign That Failed,”


107–111

Pudd’nhead Wilson, 47, 58,

61, 80–81, 82, 84–88

“Roman Daily Evening


Fasces,” 7


Roughing It, 5, 8, 10, 33, 35,

39–42, 50, 51, 95

Tom Sawyer, 24, 43, 46–47,

58, 64–67

Tramp Abroad, 9, 32, 42–43,

47


“What Is Man?,” 34, 107


Twichell, Rev. Joseph, 9, 34, 55, 104


Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 2

Victoria, 99–100


Virginia City Enterprise, 8, 11, 12


Ward, Artemus, 10–14, 96, 98


Warner, Charles Dudley, 58, 61


Webster, Charles L, and Company,


24, 27

Whitman, Walt, 1


1 2 6 I N D E X

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