Download Making sense of change management : a complete guide to the models, tools, and techniques of organizational change, 3rd edition PDF

TitleMaking sense of change management : a complete guide to the models, tools, and techniques of organizational change, 3rd edition
Author
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages504
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction
	WHO THIS BOOK IS AIMED AT
	THE BASIC CONTENT OF THE BOOK
	WHY EXPLORE DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO CHANGE?
	OVERVIEW OF STRUCTURE
	MESSAGE TO READERS
Part One The underpinning theory
	01 Individual change
		INTRODUCTION
		LEARNING AND THE PROCESS OF CHANGE
		THE BEHAVIOURAL APPROACH TO CHANGE
		THE COGNITIVE APPROACH TO CHANGE
		THE PSYCHODYNAMIC APPROACH TO CHANGE
		THE HUMANISTIC SYCHOLOGY APPROACH 
TO CHANGE
		PERSONALITY AND CHANGE
		MANAGING CHANGE IN SELF AND OTHERS
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
	02 Team change
		INTRODUCTION
		WHAT IS A GROUP AND WHEN IS IT A TEAM?
		WHY WE NEED TEAMS
		THE TYPES OF ORGANIZATIONAL TEAMS
		HOW TO IMPROVE TEAM EFFECTIVENESS
		WHAT TEAM CHANGE LOOKS LIKE
		THE LEADERSHIP ISSUES IN TEAM CHANGE
		HOW INDIVIDUALS AFFECT TEAM DYNAMICS
		HOW WELL TEAMS INITIATE AND ADAPT TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
	03 Organizational change
		HOW ORGANIZATIONS REALLY WORK
		MODELS OF AND APPROACHES TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
	04 Leading change
		INTRODUCTION
		VISIONARY LEADERSHIP
		ROLES THAT LEADERS PLAY
		LEADERSHIP STYLES, QUALITIES AND SKILLS
		DIFFERENT LEADERSHIP FOR DIFFERENT PHASES OF CHANGE
		THE IMPORTANCE OF SELF-KNOWLEDGE AND 
INNER RESOURCES
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
	05 The change agent
		INTRODUCTION
		MODELS OF CHANGE AGENCY
		THE CONSULTING PROCESS
		CHANGE AGENT TOOLS AND FRAMEWORKS
		COMPETENCIES OF THE CHANGE AGENT
		DEEPER ASPECTS OF BEING A CHANGE AGENT
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
Part Two The applications
	STRATEGIC CHANGE PROCESS
	OVERVIEW OF STRUCTURE
	06 Restructuring
		REASONS FOR RESTRUCTURING
		THE RESTRUCTURING PROCESS
		RESTRUCTURING FROM AN INDIVIDUAL CHANGE PERSPECTIVE: THE SPECIAL CASE OF REDUNDANCY
		ENABLING TEAMS TO ADDRESS ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
		CONCLUSION
	07 Mergers and acquisitions
		THE PURPOSE OF MERGER 
AND ACQUISITION ACTIVITY
		LESSONS FROM RESEARCH INTO SUCCESSFUL AND UNSUCCESSFUL MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS
		APPLYING THE CHANGE THEORY: GUIDELINES FOR LEADERS
		SUMMARY
	08 Cultural change
		GUIDELINES FOR ACHIEVING SUCCESSFUL CULTURAL CHANGE
		CASE STUDY ONE: ALIGNING THE ORGANIZATION
		CASE STUDY TWO: REBRANDING THE ORGANIZATION
		CASE STUDY THREE: CREATING AN EMPLOYER BRAND
	09 IT-based process change
		STRATEGY AND IT
		THE ROLE OF IT MANAGEMENT
		THE NEED FOR IT CHANGE MANAGERS
		ACHIEVING PROCESS CHANGE
		CHANGING THE INFORMATION CULTURE
		NEW RULES FOR A NEW AGE
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
Part Three Emerging inquiries
	10 Complex change
		INTRODUCTION
		WHEN IS CHANGE COMPLEX?
		UNDERSTANDING HOW COMPLEXITY SCIENCE APPLIES TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
		TOOLS THAT SUPPORT COMPLEX CHANGE
		THE ROLE OF LEADERS IN COMPLEX CHANGE
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
	11 Leading change in uncertain times
		INTRODUCTION
		THE IMPACT OF UNCERTAINTY ON OUR WORKING LIVES
			New organizational forms and ways of doing business
			New careers and the need for ‘managing oneself’
		DECISION MAKING IN AN UNCERTAIN WORLD
		SKILLS AND TOOLS TO SUPPORT LEADING CHANGE THROUGH UNCERTAINTY
		SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
	Conclusion
		HOW TO GET IN TOUCH WITH THE AUTHORS 
OF THIS BOOK
	References
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 252

The underpinning theory ______________________________________________________

240

is use of self with intent.’ They highlight the principles of presence
(see Table 5.11).

We will return to the notion of ‘presence’ in Chapter 11 when we look
at leaders’ ability to deal with uncertainty.

Creating the holding environment

If only we can wait, the patient arrives at understanding creatively and with
immense joy … The principle is that it is the patient and only the patient
who has the answers.

Winnicott (1969)

Table 5.11 Principles of presence

Be Honourable
Align personal assumptions, values, beliefs, behaviour
Stand for something; take a position
Dare to be different (or similar)
State the obvious
Speak the unspeakable

Be an Effective Agent of Change
Be an awareness expert
Facilitate enhanced interaction among members of the client system and

with self
Teach basic behavioural skills
Model a methodology for solving problems and for dealing with life in general
Cultivate conditions for the client to experiment with new behaviour
Help the client complete work and achieve closure on unfinished business

Be Curious
Stay in a space of perpetual wonderment
Show genuine interest in the client
Be interested in self
Explore the nature of relationships between self and client and among

individuals in the client system

Tolbert and Hanafin (2006) Use of Self in OD Consulting, Chapter 4 in The NTL
Handbook of Organization Development and Change, Jones, B and Brazzel, M (eds)
© 2006. Reproduced with permission of John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Page 253

____________________________________________________________ The change agent

241

Individual and group psychoanalytic practitioners and psychologists
such as Bion (1961), Winnicott (1965) and Bowlby (1980, 1988) stressed the
importance of the change agent’s ability to create a psychological safe
place – a holding environment, a facilitating environment – which is a
container for change to be explored and developed, in which individuals
and groups can be more at ease with their uncertainty and anxiety about
the changes they are experiencing. The principles of presence described
above will engender the creation of a holding environment. We will
return to the idea of ‘containment’ from a leadership perspective in
Chapter 11.

Creation of such an environment has physi-
cal and tangible as well as psychological
aspects; one example of both is the idea of
boundaries – boundaries such as clarity about
project scope, meetings times, and a clearly
defined set of operating procedures and
ground rules in which people can be together,
share feedback together and learn together.
This then transcends into an environment
where anxieties and concerns can be explored
without the fear of their getting out of control or being talked about out-
side destructively.

Much of what Carl Rogers wrote about (see Chapter 1) is in fact con-
cerned with creating such an environment for learning, development
and change. His three conditions to bring about growth and develop-
ment are genuineness and congruence; unconditional positive regard;
and empathetic understanding.

Heifetz and Linsky (2002), recognizing that change will inevitably
move people away from their comfort zones and cause disquiet and
unease, stress the importance of developing a holding environment ‘to
contain and adjust the heat that is being generated by addressing difficult
issues or wide value differences’. They define a holding environment as:

a space formed by a network of relationships within which people can tackle
tough, sometimes divisive questions without flying apart. Creating a holding
environment enables you to direct creative energy toward working out the
conflicts and containing passions that could easily boil over.

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