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TitleLondoners- The Days and Nights of London Now- As Told by Those Who Love It, Hate It, Live It, Left It and Long for It
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.9 MB
Total Pages381
Table of Contents
                            Title Page
Dedication
Epigraph
INTRODUCTION
PROLOGUE
	Simon Kushner,
	former Londoner
PART I
	ARRIVING
		Kevin Pover,
		commercial airline pilot
		Raymond Lunn,
		on arriving from Leeds
		Jane Lanyero,
		on arriving from Uganda
		John Harber,
		a tourist from America
		Farzad Pashazadeh,
		on arriving from Iran
	GETTING AROUND
		Emma Clarke,
		voice of the London Underground
		Nicky Dorras,
		taxi driver
		Emily Davis,
		cyclist
		Craig Clark,
		TfL Lost Property Clerk
		Noel Gaughan,
		driving instructor
		Nick Tyler,
		civil engineer
	SEEING THE SIGHTS
		David Doherty,
		on Buckingham Palace
		Bruce Smith,
		on Big Ben
		Philip and Ann Wilson,
		on the Tower of London
		Tim Turner,
		on ‘Londin’
	EARNING ONE’S KEEP
		Ruby King,
		plumber
		Kamran Sheikh,
		currency trader
		Ruth Fordham,
		manicurist
		Mary Forde,
		publican
	LOVING ONE ANOTHER
		Alina Iqbal,
		a love story
		Peter Davey and Milan Selj,
		a couple
		Mistress Absolute,
		dominatrix
		Jay Hughes,
		nurse
	GETTING ON WITH IT
		Nikky, Lindsay and Danielle,
		students
		Paulo Pimentel,
		grief counsellor
		Liston Wingate-Denys,
		personal trainer
		Smartie,
		Londoner
PART II
	CONTINUING YOUR JOURNEY
		Peter Rees,
		urban planner
		Davy Jones,
		street photographer
		Joe John Avery,
		street cleaner
		Jill Adams and Gary Williams,
		bus operations managers
		Paul Akers,
		aboriculturalist
		Elisabetta de Luca,
		commuter
	GLEANING ON THE MARGINS
		Sarah Constantine,
		skipper
		John Andrews,
		angler
		Mikey Thompkins,
		beekeeper
		Christina Oakley Harrington,
		Wiccan priestess
	FEEDING THE CITY
		Adam Byatt,
		chef
		David Smith,
		markets chief
		Peter Thomas et al.
		New Spitalfields Market traders
	CLIMBING THE LADDER
		Ashley Thomas,
		estate agent
		Robert Guerini,
		property owner
		Stephanie Walsh,
		property seeker
		Nick Stephens,
		squatter
		Mike Bennison and Geoff Bills,
		residents of Surrey
	PUTTING ON A SHOW
		Henry Hudson,
		artist
		Martins Imhangbe,
		actor
		Laetitia Sadier,
		singer
		Rinse,
		rapper
		Darren Flook,
		art gallerist
	GOING OUT
		Dan Simon,
		rickshaw-rider
		Daniel Serrano,
		cruiser
		Emmajo Read,
		nightclub door attendant
		Smartie,
		Londoner
PART III
	MAKING A LIFE
		Jo the Geordie
		who stayed in Newcastle
		Stacey the Geordie,
		who came to London
	GETTING ALONG
		Ed Husain,
		commentator
		Abul Azad,
		social worker
		Nicola Owen,
		teacher
		Guity Keens,
		interpreter
		Lucy Skilbeck,
		mother
	KEEPING THE PEACE
		Paul Jones,
		home security expert
		Colin Hendricks,
		police officer
		Nick Smith,
		riot witness
		Mohammed Al Hasan,
		suspect
		David Obiri, Jeremy Ranga and Keshav Gupta,
		barristers
		Charles Henty,
		Under-Sheriff and Secondary of London
		Barbara Tucker,
		protester
	STAYING ON TOP
		Stuart Fraser, Chairman,
		Policy and Resources
		Toby Murthwaite,
		student
		Paul Hawtin,
		hedge fund manager
		George Iacobescu,
		Canary Wharf developer
	LIVING AND DYING
		Alison Cathcart,
		marriage registrar
		Alex Blake,
		eyewitness
		Perry Powell, paramedic
		John Harris,
		funeral director
		Spencer Lee,
		crematorium technician
	DEPARTING
		Michael Linington,
		seeker
		Rob de Groot,
		antique clock restorer
		Ethel Hardy,
		old-age pensioner
		Ludmila Olszewska,
		former Londoner
		Smartie,
		Londoner
		Kevin Pover,
		commercial airline pilot
	Acknowledgements
	Index
	Also by Craig Taylor
	Copyright
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Londoners

The Days and Nights of London Now –
As Told by Those Who Love It, Hate It,

Live It, Left It and Long for It

Craig Taylor

Page 191

ten properties.
When I bought my first property, I rolled on the carpet. It was in Bromley, in

zone 5, and for the first six months I had bailiffs knocking on my door every
other week because I was defaulting on bills. But I knew I had a property. I said
to myself, this is carpet. Well, actually it wasn’t mine, it was the bank’s
carpet. I didn’t own any of it really. But I always do that – you know, touch the
walls, roll around, say out loud: it’s mine. Even with the new ones that I buy
now, I get very excited because it’s a chunk of London that’s mine.
It’s never too late to get on the ladder. We try and make them realize that if

they use their brain and use the right connections with regard to finance then
they actually can afford something. Whatever they afford we’ll show them
their best option and try and convince them to buy it. We are salesmen at the end
of the day and we do earn a fee from selling something, but we are right in
saying you must get on the ladder or it just flies away. I think the average age
four years ago of first-time buyers was 31. That’s probably increased now. And
so generally people can only get on the ladder if their parents are going to give
them a wad of money and not everybody has rich parents who can give them
£30,000 or £50,000, so you know there are people in our offices on decent
salaries trying to save a deposit, they’re in their late twenties and would love to
get on the ladder. And the first property they’ll buy will be in an ex-council
block and people hate the thought of having to live in a council block when
they’re used to renting a nice apartment. But you’ve got to get on, you know?
That council block will be full of professionals because everybody’s doing the
same thing, so there’ll be half council tenants and some of them may be rough,
some may be very nice, but the other half will be young professionals just trying
to get a foot on the ladder.
I see it all the time because I’m always dealing with clients that have to move.

They’re a couple in a two-bed flat, just about to have a baby, so they to get
somewhere with a bit of outside space or a third bedroom. They have a budget
that’s higher than what they’re selling at, and you usually organize the finance
for it so the step is there all the time. You’re always seeing the ladder. It’s like
steps, really, going up into this very big house in a great big cloud. Never
ending.
And then you see it on the downside when the economy’s not good, you see

people losing their jobs and forced sales and downsizing. We’re seeing a lot of
downsizing right now, but there’s always somebody who’s on the up who will
buy that house. Something will always sell in London because there are so many
weird, quirky, unusual people. For instance, most people want an old property
either to do up or to move straight into and a lot of people don’t like new-builds.

Page 380

Also by Craig Taylor

Page 381

Copyright

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