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TitleLIVING WITH CONFLICT: THE EFFECT OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS
LanguageEnglish
File Size437.8 KB
Total Pages184
Document Text Contents
Page 93

83

Maoists escalated their violent campaign and began to expand nationwide and the

government created the armed police force specifically to fight the Maoists. The number

of fatalities from this time on changed the insurrection from a low-intensity, to a high-

intensity conflict (Pettigrew 2004; Wallensteen and Sollenberg 2000). Thus, I create a

dichotomous variable ‘during war’ that is be coded as ‘1’ for the period from September

2000 until the end of my study in January 2006. From 1997 through August 2000, when

there was little generalized violence, this variable is coded ‘0’

Migration

My measure of migration during the study period comes from the CVFS prospective

demographic event registry. This is a panel study where interviewers visited each

household in the study sample on a monthly basis from 1996 through the present. Thus

the CVFS registry has residence records for each individual in the sample on a monthly

basis. I define a migration as a one month or longer absence from an individual’s

original 1996 residence. This measure captures short- as well as long-term migration.

This is especially important in the case of conflict, where research has shown that much

of migration is temporary. Over the 104 month period of this study, 59% of the sample

population migrated at least once. Table 3.1 shows the descriptive statistics for this and

all other variables used in this study.

[Table 3.1 about here]

Location Specific Assets and Employment

My measure of land ownership is from the CVFS Agriculture and Consumption surveys.

These are household based surveys that were undertaken in 1997 and again in 2001.

Respondents were asked how much land their household owned. Answers were coded in

Page 183

173

APPENDIX A


Figure A.1 Number of Major Gun Battles per month in Chitwan and Neighboring
Districts

0

1

2

3

4

5

N
o

v


2
0

0
2

F
e

b

M
a

y

A
u

g


N
o

v


2
0

0
3

F
e

b

M
a

y

A
u

g


N
o

v


2
0

0
4

F
e

b

M
a

y

A
u

g


N
o

v


2
0

0
5

F
e

b

M
a

y

A
u

g


N
o

v

Date

#
o

f
m

a
jo

r
g

u
n

b
a

tt
le

s

Page 184

174

Figure A.2 Number of Bomb Blasts per month in Chitwan and Neighboring
Districts

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

2
0

0
2

J
a

n

A
p

r

J
u

l

O
c

t

2
0

0
3

J
a

n

A
p

r

J
u

l

O
c

t

2
0

0
4

J
a

n

A
p

r

J
u

l

O
c

t

2
0

0
5

J
a

n

A
p

r

J
u

l

O
c

t

2
0

0
6

J
a

n

Date

#
o

f
b

o
m

b
b

la
s

ts

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