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TitleLiving Under Drones
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                            Stanford-NYU LIVING UNDER DRONES (edited released version) 10292012-1
Appendix B Strike Graphs Final-2
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Appendix_C_2012.09.23_2330_(SPS)
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Document Text Contents
Page 1

Living
 Under
 Drones
 
Death,
 Injury,
 and
 Trauma
 to
 Civilians
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From
 US
 Drone
 Practices
 in
 Pakistan
 



September
 
 
 
 
 
 2012
 
 

08 Fall
 

I n t e r n a t i o n a l
  H um a n
  R i g h t s
 
a n d
  C o n f l i c t
  R e s o l u t i o n
  C l i n i c
 

S t a n f o r d
  L a w
  S c h o o l
 

G l o b a l
  J u s t i c e
  C l i n i c
 
 
N Y U
  S c h o o l
  o f
  L a w

http://livingunderdrones.org/

Page 2

Cover Photo : Roof of the home of Faheem Qureshi, a then 14-year old victim of a January 23, 2009
drone strike (the first during President Obama’s administration), in Zeraki, North Waziristan, Pakistan.
Photo supplied by Faheem Qureshi to our research team.





















































Suggested Citation :

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION CLINIC AT STANFORD LAW SCHOOL AND GLOBAL
JUSTICE CLINIC AT NYU SCHOOL OF LAW, LIVING UNDER DRONES: DEATH, INJURY, AND TRAUMA TO
CIVILIANS FROM US DRONE PRACTICES IN PAKISTAN (2012).

Page 91

77

DIRECT PROPERTY DAMAGE AND ECONOMIC HARDSHIP IMPACTS

Many of the interviewees we spoke with experienced severe financial hardship as a
result of strike damage to their homes, loss of a primary breadwinner, or medical costs
incurred in caring for drone strike survivors.

In North Waziristan, extended families live together in compounds that often contain
several smaller individual structures.448 Many interviewees told us that often strikes not
only obliterate the target house, usually made of mud,449 but also cause significant
damage to three or four surrounding houses.450 Such destruction exacts a significant
cost on communities, especially in a place like FATA where “underdevelopment and
poverty are particularly stark,” and “savings, insurance, and social safety nets” are
largely unavailable.451

A 45 year-old rural farmer who had to leave his village after a drone destroyed his house,
told us how it affected his family:

A drone struck my home. . . . I [was at] work at that time, so there was nobody in
my home and no one killed. . . . Nothing else was destroyed other than my house. I
went back to see the home, but there was nothing to do—I just saw my home
wrecked. . . . I was extremely sad, because normally a house costs around 10 lakh ,
or 1,000,000 rupees [US $10,593], and I don’t even have 5,000 rupees now [US
$53]. I spent my whole life in that house . . . my father had lived there as well.
There is a big difference between having your own home and living on rent or
mortgage. . . . [I] belong to a poor family and my home has been destroyed . . .
[and] I’m just hoping that I somehow recover financially.452



arbitrary executions as observing that “if civilian ‘rescuers’ are indeed being intentionally targeted, there
is no doubt about the law: those strikes are a war crime”),
http://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/2012/06/21/un-expert-labels-cia-tactic-exposed-by-bureau-a-
war-crime/.
448 Interview with Zafar Husam (anonymized name and location), in Pakistan (May 2012); Interview with
Dawood Ishaq (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Mar. 8, 2012).
449 Interview with Dawood Ishaq (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Mar. 8, 2012).
450 See, e.g., Interview with Ghulam Faris (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Feb. 26, 2012)
(estimating that seven or eight houses around a house hit by a drone strike were affected); Interview with
Sadaullah Wazir, in Islamabad, Pakistan (Feb. 26, 2012) (“When a drone strikes, it easily destroys a
house.”).
451 CAMPAIGN FOR INNOCENT VICTIMS IN CONFLICT, supra note 380.
452 Interview with Adil Hashmi (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Feb. 26, 2012).

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78

He now lives in a small rented house in Miranshah with his five sons, the oldest of
whom helps support the family by selling fruits and vegetables from a vending
cart.453

Drone strikes that kill civilians also exact a substantial toll on livelihoods by
incapacitating the primary income earners of families.454 Because men are typically the
primary income earners in their families, strikes often deprive victims’ families of “a
key, and perhaps its only, source of income.”455 Families struggle to compensate for the
lost income, often forcing children or other younger relatives to forgo school and enter
the workforce at a young age.456 Eighteen-year-old Hisham Abrar, whose cousin was
killed in a drone strike, explained that “a lot of men have been killed [who are] wage
earners for the house, and now the kids and the families don’t have a source of income
because of that.”457 Others in his community do what they can to help, but “they are
poor, and they usually just rely on labor services—daily wage earning. That’s only
sufficient for themselves, so it’s hard to help others. But whenever they can, they do.”458

One man told us that several of his friends killed in the March 17, 2011 jirga strike459
“left a family and children” to be cared for by family members who have to “work with
their hands and feet” in hard labor to support them.460 Another strike survivor
explained that a friend killed in a strike:

left behind a mother, two sisters, and a young baby brother. And they now live on
whatever the village gives them as charity. [The man’s younger brothers] tried to
go out as laborers but they cannot do it. The other village men help them. And
there are sometimes these neighbors that give them food, sometimes not, but
they are basically living on charity.461



453 Id.
454 CAMPAIGN FOR INNOCENT VICTIMS IN CONFLICT, supra note 380, at 26-28.
455 Id. at 26.
456 Id ; see Interview with Hisham Abrar (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Feb. 26, 2012).
457 Interview with Hisham Abrar (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Feb. 26, 2012).
458 Id.
459 See March 17, 2011 Strike Narrative, supra Chapter 3: Living Under Drones.
460 In Interview with Masood Afwan (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Feb. 26, 2012). Other
relatives of those killed in the March 17, 2011 strike told of similar difficulties supporting family members
due to lost income from the strike victims. See March 17, 2011 Strike Narrative, supra Chapter 3: Living
Under Drones.
461 Interview with Haroon Quddoos (anonymized name), in Islamabad, Pakistan (Mar. 8, 2012).

Page 182

168












































Image of original photos
taken by Noor Behram,

Pakistani photojournalist. The
photos are part of a collection of

images of drone victims and drone
sites compiled by Mr. Behram.


© 2012 Stanford Law School & NYU School of Law

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