Download Living in democracy PDF

TitleLiving in democracy
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.3 MB
Total Pages212
Document Text Contents
Page 1

EDC/HRE Volume III

Living in democracy
Rolf Gollob and Peter Krapf (editors)

EDC/HRE lesson plans for lower secondary level

Council of Europe Publishing
Editions du Conseil de l’Europe

L
ivin

g in
d

em
ocracy

R
olf G

ollob and Peter K
rapf (editors)

E
D

C
/H

R
E

V
olu

m
e III

C
o
u
n
cil o

f Eu
ro

p
e P

u
b
lish

in
g

Ed
itio

n
s d

u
C

o
n
seil d

e l’Eu
ro

p
e

C
ou

n
cil of E

u
rop

e P
u

b
lish

in
g

This is a manual for teachers in Education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC) and Human Rights Education (HRE), EDC/HRE textbook
editors and curriculum developers. Nine teaching units of approximately
four lessons each focus on key concepts of EDC/HRE. The lesson plans give
step-by-step instructions and include student handouts and background
information for teachers. In this way, the manual is suited for trainees or
beginners in the teaching profession and teachers who are receiving in-service
teacher training in EDC/HRE. Experienced teachers may draw on the ideas
and materials. The complete manual provides a full school year’s curriculum
for lower secondary classes, but as each unit is also complete in itself, the
­manual­allows­great­flexibility­in­use.­
The objective of EDC/HRE is the active citizen who is willing and able to
participate in the democratic community. Therefore EDC/HRE strongly
emphasise action and task-based learning. The school community is conceived
as a sphere of authentic experience where young people can learn how to
participate in democratic decision making and may take responsibility at an
early age. Key concepts of EDC/HRE are taught as tools of life-long learning.

This is Volume III out of a series of six:

EDC/HRE Volume I: Educating for democracy: Background materials on democratic citizenship
and human rights education for teachers

EDC/HRE Volume II: Growing up in democracy: Lesson plans for primary level
on democratic citizenship and human rights

EDC/HRE Volume III: Living in Democracy: EDC/HRE Lesson plans for lower secondary level

EDC/HRE Volume IV: Taking part in democracy: Lesson plans for upper secondary level
on democratic citizenship and human rights

EDC/HRE Volume V: Exploring children’s rights: nine short projects for primary level

EDC/HRE Volume VI: Teaching democracy: a collection of models for democratic citizenship

and human rights education

-:HSTCSH=V[XXWZ:
e15/US$23

www.coe.int

http://book.coe.int
Council of Europe Publishing

The Council of Europe has 47 member states, covering virtually the entire continent of Europe. It seeks to
develop common democratic and legal principles based on the European Convention on Human Rights and other
reference texts on the protection of individuals. Ever since it was founded in 1949, in the aftermath of the Second
World War, the Council of Europe has symbolised reconciliation.

ISBN 978-92-871-6332-5

ID
5599

Page 2

Living in democracy
EDC/HRE lesson plans for lower secondary level

Edited by Rolf Gollob and Peter Krapf
Authors: Rolf Gollob, Ted Huddleston, Peter Krapf, Don Rowe, Wim Taelman

Volume III
of
EDC/HRE Volumes I-VI
Education for Democratic Citizenship
and Human Rights in school practice
Teaching sequences, concepts, methods and models

Council of Europe Publishing

ID_5599 8/04/08 11:56 Page 1

Page 106

105

Unit 4 – Conflict

Student handout 4.3
Five cases of conflicting human rights

Case 1

Max is an eight-year-old boy who was seriously wounded in an accident and urgently needs a
blood transfusion at a hospital. However, his father forbids the hospital staff to carry it out for
religious reasons. His mother and the doctors would like to save his life.

Case 2

In a hospital, only a limited number of people work in the emergency department. It is a hectic
evening and there is only room for one more person to have immediate emergency treatment.
Since the lives of two people are still in danger, the doctors have to decide whether to treat a
young child or a successful businessman.

Case 3

Gus is a well-respected member of a religious political party, which strongly emphasises family
values. A journalist who visits the party’s headquarters discovers by chance a series of personal
letters from X, from which he can conclude without doubt that Gus is having an extramarital
relationship. The journalist publishes the story.

Case 4

Youtchou lives in a Third World country. He is poor and is able to meet his basic needs, but
nothing more. He would like to start studying, but cannot find the necessary means to do so. His
country is not able to provide him with the resources needed, as the state of the economy is very
bad and it has to use all the resources available to cover the basic needs of the population.

Case 5

The local authorities are planning to build a new school on a piece of land which is one of the
rare places where children can still play.

ID_5599 8/04/08 11:56 Page 105

Page 107

106

Living in democracy

Student handout 4.4
Is violence acceptable in some cases?

Case 1
During a demonstration on the issue of anti-globalisation, a small group of people starts throwing
stones at the headquarters building of a famous trans-national company. The police force present
on the spot sees this taking place and tries to arrest the people involved. During this intervention,
a policeman is captured by the people throwing stones and is seriously beaten.

Questions:

1. Would it be acceptable for the police force to use their guns to shoot at the people throwing
stones?

2. Would it be acceptable for the police to intervene using machine guns? (This intervention
would be faster, but would almost certainly result in more casualties.)

3. Would it be acceptable for the police to wait until they are able to intervene using a water
cannon?

4. Would it be acceptable for the police not to intervene by using force, in order to avoid
escalation of the conflict?

Case 2
Country X declares war on country Y because Y clearly protects and even finances rebel groups
operating against country X from within country Y. Country X’s intelligence team discovers in
which village a group of well-trained and armed rebels are staying, and finds out that they are
preparing a major bomb attack on an important industrial target.

Questions:

1. Would it be acceptable for country X to bomb the village heavily, making sure only a few
people, including local inhabitants, survive?

2. Would the former be acceptable after a clear request to the rebels to surrender and a clear
warning to the local population to leave the village and to gather in the local sports stadium,
where they would be allowed in after being searched for weapons?

3. Would it be acceptable not to intervene by using force? What alternatives can you think of?

Case 3
Mr X, a young man working as a technical assistant at the local hospital, regularly beats his wife
when he arrives home drunk. His wife once informed the police about the beatings by her husband,
which are sometimes serious. The neighbour’s wife, who accidentally became aware of the
situation, can now imagine what is going on next door when she hears her neighbours arguing and
shouting.

Questions:

1. Should the neighbour’s wife inform the police in such cases, or is that an unacceptable
intrusion into her neighbour’s privacy?

2. When they receive information from someone, should the police intervene in these
circumstances?

ID_5599 8/04/08 11:56 Page 106

Page 211

ID_5599 8/04/08 11:56 Page 210

Page 212

EDC/HRE Volume III

Living in democracy
Rolf Gollob and Peter Krapf (editors)

EDC/HRE lesson plans for lower secondary level

Council of Europe Publishing
Editions du Conseil de l’Europe

L
ivin

g in
d

em
ocracy

R
olf G

ollob and Peter K
rapf (editors)

E
D

C
/H

R
E

V
olu

m
e III

C
o
u
n
cil o

f Eu
ro

p
e P

u
b
lish

in
g

Ed
itio

n
s d

u
C

o
n
seil d

e l’Eu
ro

p
e

C
ou

n
cil of E

u
rop

e P
u

b
lish

in
g

This is a manual for teachers in Education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC) and Human Rights Education (HRE), EDC/HRE textbook
editors and curriculum developers. Nine teaching units of approximately
four lessons each focus on key concepts of EDC/HRE. The lesson plans give
step-by-step instructions and include student handouts and background
information for teachers. In this way, the manual is suited for trainees or
beginners in the teaching profession and teachers who are receiving in-service
teacher training in EDC/HRE. Experienced teachers may draw on the ideas
and materials. The complete manual provides a full school year’s curriculum
for lower secondary classes, but as each unit is also complete in itself, the
­manual­allows­great­flexibility­in­use.­
The objective of EDC/HRE is the active citizen who is willing and able to
participate in the democratic community. Therefore EDC/HRE strongly
emphasise action and task-based learning. The school community is conceived
as a sphere of authentic experience where young people can learn how to
participate in democratic decision making and may take responsibility at an
early age. Key concepts of EDC/HRE are taught as tools of life-long learning.

This is Volume III out of a series of six:

EDC/HRE Volume I: Educating for democracy: Background materials on democratic citizenship
and human rights education for teachers

EDC/HRE Volume II: Growing up in democracy: Lesson plans for primary level
on democratic citizenship and human rights

EDC/HRE Volume III: Living in Democracy: EDC/HRE Lesson plans for lower secondary level

EDC/HRE Volume IV: Taking part in democracy: Lesson plans for upper secondary level
on democratic citizenship and human rights

EDC/HRE Volume V: Exploring children’s rights: nine short projects for primary level

EDC/HRE Volume VI: Teaching democracy: a collection of models for democratic citizenship

and human rights education

-:HSTCSH=V[XXWZ:
e15/US$23

www.coe.int

http://book.coe.int
Council of Europe Publishing

The Council of Europe has 47 member states, covering virtually the entire continent of Europe. It seeks to
develop common democratic and legal principles based on the European Convention on Human Rights and other
reference texts on the protection of individuals. Ever since it was founded in 1949, in the aftermath of the Second
World War, the Council of Europe has symbolised reconciliation.

ISBN 978-92-871-6332-5

ID
5599

Similer Documents