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TitleLiving in a converged world
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Table of Contents
                            01
S1.1_Invited_Hu
S1.2_Talamo_1569875905
S1.3_Manasseh_1569869751
S1.4_Murata_1569870897
02a
S2.1_Zakrzewska_1569875831
S2.2_Kim_1569876859
S2.3_Borodakiy_1569875797
02b
S2.4_El-Moghazi_1569876077
S2.5_Bochechka_1569874833
S2.6_Okello_1569869975
S2.7_Nleya_1569876089
03
S3.2_Cardoso_1569867527
S3.3_Lutchman_1569876671
S3.4_Tanaka_1569876009
04
S4.1_Spyropoulos_1569876013
S4.2_Serrano_1569875687
S4.3_Kuroda_1569875779
S4.4_Liberal_1569876097
05
S5.1_Kafle_1569875781
S5.2_Rodenas_1569874143
S5.3_Namiot_1569867425
06
S6.1_Invited_Krechmer
S6.2_Hoel_1569875941
S6.3_Nakanishi_1569875955
S6.4_Pierce_1569875701
poster
P.1_Filipovic_1569876055
P.2_Arifuzzaman_1569873743
P.3_Vitas_1569876061
P.4_Koval_1569874825
P.5_Nugraha_1569875677
P.6_Saiz_1569876019
P.7_Shen_1569875633
P.8_Alam_1569876091
P.9_Bai_1569869755
P.10_Suschenko_1569875611
P.11_Barclay_1569876037
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	Session 1: The future of convergence
		Session 2 - Part I: 3G, 4G, 5G and beyond - the impact on spectrum
		Session 2- Part II: 3G, 4G, 5G and beyond - the impact on spectrum
		Session 3: Multimedia applications for all?!
		Session 4: E-Health and standards
		Session 6: Standardisation Issues
		Poster Session
	Index of Authors
Blank Page
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	ITU Document
	Foreword
	Malcolm Johnson Director ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector
	Chair's Message
	Sergey Bachevsky General Chair
	Table of Contents
	Committees
	Keynote Summaries
	ITU Document
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

I n t e r n a t i o n a l T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n U n i o n



IEEE Catalogue Number: CFP1438E-ART





Proceedings of the 2014

ITU Kaleidoscope
Academic Conference







Living in a
converged

world
Impossible without standards?


St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, 3-5 June 2014

Page 2

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed in these Proceedings are those of the paper authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the
International telecommunication Union or of its membership.









 ITU 2014

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, by any means whatsoever, without the prior written
permission of ITU.

Page 159

GLOBAL STANDARDS, THE KEY ENABLERS FOR DEPLOYING NEXT GENERATION

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS


Fidel Liberal
1
, Jose Oscar Fajardo

1
, Naiara Goia

2
, Ioanna Mesogiti

3



1
ETSI Bilbao, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain

2
ITELAZPI S.A., Spain

3
COSMOTE Mobile Telecommunications S.A., Greece







ABSTRACT



Nowadays, the Critical Communications networks are

experiencing the transformation that will lay the

foundations for next decades of emergency

communications. Although different forums claim for the

benefits of different technological solutions, this evolution

seems to be driven towards the adoption of commercial

radio technologies and mass market devices. Although new

standards are being developed by different standardization

organizations, the concept of interoperability between

Public Safety organizations as a holistic standpoint is still

an open issue standards should address in the near future.

This paper analyzes the current trends in next generation

Critical Communications, and reviews the different efforts

carried out by different standardization organizations. It is

shown that, although different aspects of interoperability

are addressed, an integral interoperability framework is

needed. Additionally, the specific area of Operation and

Management is discussed as one of the missing pieces. A

series of system requirements and design principles are

finally provided.



Keywords— PMR, LTE, TETRA, First Responder,

Convergence, Interoperability



1. INTRODUCTION



Users of first responder (FR) communication systems are

aware of the benefits that the integration of new advanced

data services could bring to their professional sectors. In

order to satisfy the need for broadband data services in

Public Safety, plenty of effort has already been put to

improving data transmission capabilities of various

Professional Mobile Radio (PMR) technologies. For

example, the European Telecommunications Standards

Institute (ETSI) proposed in 1995 the Terrestrial Trunked

Radio (TETRA) technology for PMR. Later in 2005, the

TETRA Association, working with ETSI, developed the

TETRA Enhanced Data Service (TEDS) standard, which

has been considered suitable for advanced security services

such as video surveillance, extensive image sharing and

positioning. However, TEDS technology is becoming

obsolete in view of the requirements of new emergency

applications and considering the need for upgrading it to

broadband. In fact, due to limited spectrum availability for

existing TETRA systems resulting in 50-100 kbps data

services (far from theoretical maximum of 540 kbps), the

first wave of TEDS speeds will not meet the broadband

requirements despite its potential capabilities.

At the same time, public mobile networks are evolving

from the existing 2G (GSM / GPRS), 3G (UMTS / HSPA /

HSPA+) technologies towards more advanced 4G

wideband solutions such as Long Term Evolution (LTE),

supporting wider coverage and higher data rates (50-100

Mbps for uplink/downlink without antenna diversity). The

future of mobile communications seems to be directed

towards an all-IP world, with direct impact on the provision

of multimedia services. It is evidenced that the evolution of

public communication network technologies supports a

number of enhanced services (e.g. video calls, geolocation,

efficient multicasting, etc.), which are not currently offered

to the Critical Communications sector.

Figure 1 illustrates the different technology release rate for

Critical Communications PMR technologies and public

mobile networks. It’s clear that emergency and commercial

sectors have traditionally shown significantly different

technology evolution timescales.

As a result, various forums’ discussions lately focus on the

evolution of PMR technologies in comparison to the

integration of mission critical aspects into public wideband

networks.



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Figure 1. Evolution of Private and Public mobile networks

technologies.

The research leading to these results has received funding from
the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-

2013) under grant agreement 284863 (FP7 SEC GERYON).

978-92-61-14421-0/CFP1438E-ART © 2014 ITU Kaleidoscope– 143 –

Page 160

DESIRED EVOLUTION

Long term

Land Mobile Radio Networks

Mission Critical Voice

Mission Critical Data

Public Safety Wireless

Broadband Networks

Public Safety Mission

Critical Data Applications

Commercial and Unlicensed

Wireless Broadband Networks

REQUIREMENTS

GENERAL
• Funding

• Governance

- Planning

- Partnerships

- Policy

• Research, Development,

Testing and Evaluation

TECHNICAL
• Guaranteed Access

• Quality of Service

• Reliability

• Resiliency

• Roaming

• Spectrum Efficiency and

Capacity

- Coverage

• Talk Around / Simples

Convergence of

Mission Critical

Voice and Data

Public Safety Data Applications

CURRENT TRANSITION

Indefinite Time Frame



Figure 2. Expected evolution of Public Safety

Communication (U.S. Department of Homeland Security).



It is therefore commonly accepted that future mission

critical networks will evolve from the current narrowband

audio-only communications to media-enriched wideband

communications [1]. This will endow emergency

professionals with enhanced capabilities to response against

hazardous situations.

The main technological candidate for supporting this kind

of service is LTE [2]. In fact, several PMR organizations

have already initiated the use of both public and private

communication technologies providing their professionals

with dual terminals, although they are used for different

purposes -critical and non-critical services. A converged

scenario will enable those professionals to make the most

of both worlds, while assuring efficient use of critical

resources.

Unfortunately, since current situation of commercial

standards is not considered mature enough as to provide

Critical Communications, no timeframe or specific

roadmap has been yet proposed. For example, the U.S.

Department of Homeland Security published in November

2011 a now famous figure of expected evolution (Figure 2).

Note that no time scale has not even been foreseen, and the

convergence scenario is denoted as “Long Term”.

Meanwhile, traditional PMRs would be used for mission

critical voice while data will use novel technologies.

This paper overviews the current state and trends of Public

Safety networks in Section 2, with special focus on

international Standards Development Organizations (SDO)

concerning private-public convergence and interoperability.

Focusing on the interoperability topic, Section 3 analyzes

the interoperability in a multi-organization environment

from the Operations And Management (OAM) standpoint.

From this analysis, Section 4 provides a series of

requirements and infers a set of design principles that a

complete interoperability system should take into account.

Section 5 discusses the need for international standards

proposing high level architectures and common procedures

regarding OAM and service abstraction in interoperable

multi-organization networks. Also, an IMS-based multi-

domain framework is analyzed. Finally, Section 6 offers the

conclusions to the paper.

high level objectives

harmonized strategy

aligned operations

aligned procedures

knowledge

Information interoperability

data model interoperability

protocol interoperability

physical interoperability

organizational aspects

technical aspects


Figure 3. SECRICOM interoperability levels [6].



2. NEXT GENERATION PUBLIC SAFETY

NETWORKS AND STANDARDIZATION TRENDS



Critical Communications networks are currently

experiencing the main transformation that will lead to the

next generation infrastructures to be used for the

forthcoming decades. Therefore, the design of these

networks must be performed very carefully, and taking into

account different aspects such as professional users’

requirements, the current economical situation and new

business models for the sector, etc.

Among many studies and reports, the European

Commission Joint Research Center (JRC) states the

following challenges to be considered in the next

generation of Public Protection Disaster Relief (PPDR)

systems [3]:

• Interoperability.

• Broadband Connectivity.

• Underground/Lack of coverage.

• Degraded or Destroyed infrastructures.

• Technological gap with commercial technologies.

As can be observed, the evolution of network capabilities

towards those already available in commercial mobile

networks is one of the key aspects. At the same time,

aspects of interoperability remain as a hot issue in Critical

Communications networks, not only between different

PMR networks but even more when considering

commercial radio technologies and the possible

convergence of both worlds.

The concept of interoperability involves many different

aspects. One of the most complete definitions of PPDR

interoperability can be found in [4]: “interoperability

between various responder agencies may be defined as the

capability of two organizations or discrete parts of the same

organization to exchange decision-critical information and

to use the information that has been exchanged.” The

interoperability stack in Figure 3 depicts the different

compatibility levels required for a true interoperability

solution.

In addition to numerous research and commercial

initiatives, several SDOs are working on different aspects

of interoperability nowadays. Yet, different SDOs cover

2014 ITU Kaleidoscope Academic Conference

– 144 –

Page 317

Index of Authors


Ahmed, Ashir ................................................... 135
Akyildiz, IF .......................................................... 3

Alam, Ifterkharul ............................................... 255

Alam, Mohammad S .......................................... 255

Alencar, Marcelo S .............................................. 97

Akaoka, Yasunobu ............................................ 135

Arifuzzaman, Mohammad ................................. 215

Atungire, Patricia ................................................. 73



Bagula, Bigomokero Antoine ............................ 79
Bai, Fan ............................................................. 263

Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan ................................ 4

Barchiesi, Maria Laura ........................................ 15

Barclay, Corlane ................................................ 275

Bayarou, Kpatcha .............................................. 233

Berger, Michael S ................................................ 39

Bochechka, Grigory ............................................. 69

Borodakiy, Vladimir ............................................ 53

Budigiri, Gerald ................................................... 73



Carugi, Marco .................................................. 249
Cristobo, Leire ................................................... 241



De Miranda Cardoso, José Vinicius .................. 97
Dosch, Christoph ................................................. 89



El-Moghazi, Mohamed ...................................... 63


Fajardo, José Oscar .......................................... 143
Fazio, Maria ........................................................... 5

Feng, Wei ............................................................. 9

Filipovic' , Ellen ............................................... 207

Fukushima, Yusuke ........................................... 153



Garcia-Haro, Joan ............................................ 161
Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier ....................... 161

Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe ...................................... 161

Goia, Naiara ....................................................... 143

Gosh, Partha Partim ........................................... 135

Gudkova, Irina A ................................................ 53



Hanseth, Ole ........................................................ 6
Haque, Md Nafizul ............................................ 255

Harai, Hiroaki .................................................... 153

Hoel, Thore ........................................................ 185

Hosein, Patrick ................................................... 105

Hu, Kevin .............................................................. 9



Ibarrola, Eva ..................................................... 241
Irvine, James ........................................................ 63



Kafle, Ved P .................................................... 153
Kanaya, Yoshiaki ............................................... 191

Khondoker, Rahamatullah ................................. 233

Kibalya, Godfrey ................................................. 73

Kim, Dong-hyu .................................................... 47

Kodate, Akihisa ................................................. 111

Koga, Yasuyuki ................................................. 135

Koucheryavy, Yevgeni .......................................... 4

Koval, Victor ..................................................... 229

Krechmer, Ken ................................................... 177

Kuroda, Masahiro .............................................. 135

Kwak, Jooyoung .................................................. 47



Lee, Heejin ......................................................... 47
Liberal, Fidel...................................................... 143

Lopez, Diego ......................................................... 9

Lu, Felix ................................................................. 9

Lutchman, Sudesh .............................................. 105

Lutokhin, Alexander .......................................... 269



Living in a converged world - Impossible without standards?

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denicola
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Page 318

Manasseh, Emmanuel Chifuel .......................... 23
Markova, Ekaterina V ......................................... 53

Maruf, Rafiqul ................................................... 135

Marx, Ronald ..................................................... 233

Medzmariashvili, Megi ...................................... 197

Merella, Daniela .................................................. 15

Mesogiti, Ioanna ................................................ 143

Murata, Yoshitoshi .............................................. 29

Mvuma, Aloys ..................................................... 23



Nakisozi, Proscovia .......................................... 73
Namiot, Dmitry.................................................. 169

Nakanishi, Hiroshi ............................................. 191

Nakashima, Naoki ............................................. 135

Nazarenko, Anatoly ........................................... 269

Nleya, Sindiso Mpenyu ....................................... 79

Nohara, Yasunobu ............................................. 135

Nugraha, Beny ................................................... 233



Ohno, Shuichi .................................................... 23
Oka, Tetsuo ....................................................... 191

Okello, Dorothy ................................................... 73



Pierce, Justin .................................................... 197
Pietrosemoli, Ermanno ........................................ 79

Prasad, Ramjee .................................................. 221

Puliafito, Antonio .................................................. 5



Regis, Carlos Danilo .......................................... 97
Rodenas-Herraiz, David .................................... 161

Rojas Mendizabal, Verónica.............................. 129

Ruepp, Sarah ....................................................... 39



Saito, Shinya ...................................................... 29
Saiz, Eduardo ..................................................... 241

Samouylov, Konstantin ........................................ 53

Sarian, Viliam .................................................... 269

Sato, Takuro ............................................... 215, 263

Schunk, Christian ................................................. 15

Serrano-Santoyo, Arturo .................................... 129

Shawkat, Shamin Ara ....................................... 255

Shen, Subin ........................................................ 249

Showkat, Shafika ............................................... 255

Simunic, Dina .................................................... 221

Sneps-Sneppe, Manfred ..................................... 169

Spyropoulos, Vasileios P. .................................. 121

Su, Yuwei .......................................................... 263

Sun, Qiong ............................................................ 9

Suschenko, Nikolay ........................................... 269



Taboada, Ianire ................................................ 241
Talamo, Maurizio ................................................ 15

Tanaka, Yasuhiro ............................................... 111

Tikhvinskiy, Valery ..................................... 69, 229

Tsou, Tina .............................................................. 9



Vitas, Igor ....................................................... 221


Whalley, Jason .................................................. 63


Xia, Wenfeng ....................................................... 9
Xie, Haiyong .......................................................... 9



Yamamoto, Toru ................................................ 23
Yu, Keping ......................................................... 215



Zakrzewska, Anna ............................................. 39
Zennaro, Marco ................................................... 79

Zrno, Damir ....................................................... 221







2014 ITU Kaleidoscope Academic Conference

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