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TitleLIVING A CURRICULUM OF TENSIONS
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                            Acknowledgements
I would first like to thank my supervisor, Dr. Nick Forsberg, for his unwavering support throughout my journey of learning to teach, teaching in schools, undergraduate and graduate work, and all the highs and lows along the way. Your passion for Heal...
I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Janice Huber, Dr. Harold Riemer, and Dr. Cyril Kesten for the many hours they dedicated to thorough and thoughtful feedback throughout the process. Your perspectives have proven invaluable to my le...
Dedication
Thank you to my parents, Roger and Carol Funk, who provided me with unconditional love and every opportunity growing up. Your guidance and support has allowed me to succeed and fail; invaluable lessons you have taught me. Thank you for always asking h...
Thank you to my best friend, Terry Mario, for lending an ear, a place to live, and many fantastic meals over the years. We have shared many experiences and, as you said, a good companion shortens the longest road. I cannot imagine any journey without ...
Last but not least I want to thank my partner, Jason Kell. You have supported me throughout this journey and reminded me of what is really important. Thank you for always listening and doing the little things every day.
Acknowledgements......................................................................................................... IV
Funk_Shannon_17-jan-2014.pdf
	UNIVERSITY OF REGINA
	FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH
	SUPERVISORY AND EXAMINING COMMITTEE
Funk_Shannon_17-jan-2014.pdf
	UNIVERSITY OF REGINA
	FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH
	SUPERVISORY AND EXAMINING COMMITTEE
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

LIVING A CURRICULUM OF TENSIONS: EXPERIENCES OF LEARNING TO

TEACH PHYSICAL EDUCATION



A Thesis

Submitted to The Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

For the Degree of



Doctor of Philosophy

In

Education

University of Regina



By

Shannon D. Funk

Regina, Saskatchewan

March, 2014







© 2014: S.D. Funk

Page 2

UNIVERSITY OF REGINA


FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH


SUPERVISORY AND EXAMINING COMMITTEE


Shannon Dale Funk, candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education, has
presented a thesis titled, Living a Curriculum of Tensions: Experiences of Learning to
Teach Physical Education, in an oral examination held on February 25, 2014. The
following committee members have found the thesis acceptable in form and content, and
that the candidate demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject material.


External Examiner: *Dr. Sandra Gibbons, University of Victoria


Supervisor: Dr. Nicholas J. Forsberg, Curriculum & Instruction


Committee Member: Dr. Harold A. Riemer, Faculty of Kinesiology & Health Studies


Committee Member: Dr. Janice Huber, Curriculum & Instruction


Committee Member: Dr. Cyril A. Kesten, Curriculum & Instruction






Chair of Defense: Dr. Dongyan Blachford, Faculty of Graduate Studies &
Research


*via teleconference

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necessarily accepting of them. Bresler (2006) called it improvising or being highly

attentive to new contexts, expanding settings, new categories and identifying new themes;

being highly responsive throughout the research process. Throughout the inquiry I needed

to constantly ask questions of meaning, social significance, and purpose, and always

being mindful of the why or justification of the inquiry; the process was not linear. Caine

and Estefan (2011) summarized by saying:

One of the responsibilities of being a narrative inquirer is to develop field texts

and interim research texts that reflect the stories being lived and told by

participants and researchers and to work with participants toward a representation

of their experiences. In order to achieve this, researchers engage in a back-and-

forth process of conversation, text composition, and text revision. It is in the

living of this back-and-forth process that we gain new insights, which open up

places of sustained inquiry, communal places of new understandings. (Caine &

Estefan, 2011, p. 968)

I wondered about how pre-service teachers experience learning to teach Physical

Education, and why this was important to inquire into. As well, I needed to remain

attentive to the three-dimensional narrative inquiry space and intersection points for

examination.

Clandinin and Connelly (2000) agreed that the quantity of field texts can become

unmanageable and said it is important to know what is there before attempting to do

anything with them. The first task I undertook when the 16-week internship semester

concluded was to read and re-read all of the field texts. I spent time with the field texts,

puzzling over meaning. I continued to write my thoughts and reflections in the margins of

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transcriptions, journals, and field notes. Burwash (2013) explained her process of moving

between field texts and interim research texts by saying that “Interim research texts are

developed, holding fast to an ontological commitment to exploring the narratives of

experience shared by participants” (p. 64). I began by creating a detailed chronological

encounter of the semester for Lauren and Ali, using a combination of transcriptions, text

messages, field notes, and artifacts in order to begin to make sense of all the field texts. I

found this transition very challenging and Clandinin (2013) agreed that “As we move

from composing field texts to composing interim research texts, the time is marked with

tension and uncertainty” (p. 47). I talked to Ali and Lauren frequently after the semester

concluded but, realistically, we needed to find a way to engage less often in order to fulfil

other commitments. By discussing in more detail the co-composition of interim research

texts, we were able to still engage in relational ways.

The initial interim research texts I began to write were shared with Lauren and Ali

separately and we spent some time thinking narratively about the stories and experiences

from the semester. Clandinin (2013) explained that “Interim research texts, such as

narrative accounts, are ways to make sense of the multiple and diverse field texts. Interim

research texts are a way to engage in further re-tellings and re-livings of research

relationships” (p. 49). From the interim research texts, we identified where actions/events

occurred, story lines interwove, and gaps or silences were found. Similar to Burwash

(2013), by “...considering all of the possible stories... or what we had lived as part of the

inquiry process, [we] then chose specific stories of practice that seemed to [us] to be

particularly relevant to the wonders about the experience... (p. 64). We highlighted

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Appendix F

Alexandra’s School Division Consent

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Appendix G

Transcription Contract of Confidentiality

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