Download Lived Experience of Unemployment Due to Injury - Trinity Western PDF

TitleLived Experience of Unemployment Due to Injury - Trinity Western
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TagsUnemployment
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages118
Table of Contents
                            GRADUATE COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

COUPLES’ LIVED EXPERIENCE OF UNEMPLOYMENT DUE TO INJURY:
NAVIGATING THE ROAD TOGETHER


by


RACHELLE L. SIEMENS



A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS


in


THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES


GRADUATE COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM



We accept this thesis as conforming
to the required standard




……………………………………………………..

José F. Domene, Ph.D., Thesis Supervisor & Coordinator


……………………………………………………..

Faith Auton-Cuff, Ph.D., Second Reader


……………………………………………………..

Norman E. Amundson, Ph.D., External Examiner


TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY

November 2007

© Rachelle L. Siemens

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job you realized how much impact that was having on stress levels. So it made it

easier to make that break, and start to explore options.

Julian agreed:

I probably should have left that job a couple years before, ‘cause it was stressing

me out that much. And um… I’m a musician really. My day job really just has to

provide income. So, it made sense to be out of that, find something that would pay

better…

Thus, the impact of injury and unemployment was different for Julian than for the others.

He did not experience his unemployment as a terrible, self-altering road-block, because

he was not satisfied in his job to begin with. His experience did not affect his identity to

the same degree because his identity was tied more centrally to his leisure activities,

which he remained able to take part in, than in his work.

Effects on Mental Health

In addition to the negative effects on their identity and career, several of the

participants in this study reported experiencing declines in their mental health as a result

of the injury and unemployment as well. Some said they felt depressed and hopeless at

times, while others reported struggling with “depression.” Others described the toll that

extreme frustration, stress, and worry had on them. Not surprisingly, it was not just the

injured spouses who experienced these declines; uninjured spouses also felt that their

mental health suffered as a result of their partner’s injury and unemployment.

“Stress” and “worry” were two words that consistently emerged throughout each

interview I conducted. Time and time again, couples used these words to describe the

impact of financial strain, insurance battles, and the physical aftermath of the injuries they

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4. The Role of Children

5. Effects on the Marital Relationship

6. Coping with what happened forced the couple to become closer

7. Dealing with External Systems

8. Effects on Identity and Career Direction

9. Financial Impact

10. Effects on Mental Health

11. Effects on the Uninjured Spouse

Themes that did not apply to “Pete” and “Marin’s” experience

12. Specific Strategies of Coping

13. Financial Support from External Systems

“Colin” and “Natasha”

1. The Role of Children

2. Financial Impact

3. Consequences of Physical Limitations in Functioning

4. Dealing with External Systems

5. Common Strategies of Coping

6. Effects on the Marital Relationship

7. Specific Strategies of Coping

8. Financial Support from External Systems

9. Effects on Identity and Career Direction

10. Effects on the Uninjured Spouse

11. The Role of Spirituality

12. Emergence of a Stronger Relationship

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