Download Lighting Management System in Industrial Environments PDF

TitleLighting Management System in Industrial Environments
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size5.8 MB
Total Pages121
Table of Contents
                            Table of Contents
List of Figures
List of Tables
Chapter 1:  Introduction
	1.1 Problem statement
	1.2 Thesis objective
	1.3 Structure of the dissertation
Chapter 2:  State of the art survey
	2.1 Lighting management systems for industrial environments
	2.2 Microcontroller
	2.3 Photodetector
		2.3.1 Photoresistor
		2.3.2 Photodiode
		2.3.3 Phototransistor
		2.3.4 Optical sensor
	2.4 Industrial communication
		2.4.1 RS – 485
		2.4.2 ZigBee
Chapter 3:  Light control system – general specifications
	3.1 Global overview
	3.2 Light sensor
	3.3 Switching board connection
	3.4 System communication
	3.5 Working areas
	3.6 Modular build
	3.7 User interface
	3.8 Selected development strategy
Chapter 4:  Light control system – design and test
	4.1 System architecture
	4.2 Operation principle
	4.3 Control board
	4.4 Extension board
	4.5 Sensor Board
Chapter 5:  Conclusions
	5.1 Future work proposed
References
Appendix A: Circuit designs
Appendix B: PCB designs
Appendix C: Software design
                        
Document Text Contents
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LIGHTING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS




38


every sensor board would not be necessary anymore. That would make

communication easier. Unfortunately, using this solution would require more cable,

since every sensor board would possess its own signal line.

It is also possible to use ZigBee wireless technology, which is a little bit more

complicated but it does not require putting expensive cables in order to perform

data transmission. From all wireless communication technologies available, ZigBee

was considered due to its low power consumption, low bit rates (up to 250Kbps)

and range up to 100m. Typical applications of this standard include sensor

networks, home automation and alarm systems so it is exactly what is needed for

designing this system.

The ZigBee network, proposed for this project, would consist of a network

coordinator, which in this case would be placed on the control board and end

devices placed on each of sensor boards (Figure 34). The control board starts the

network, assigns its ID, allows the sensor boards to join the network and gather data

directly from them.





FIGURE 34: ZIGBEE BASED SYSTEM COMMUNICATION .



Typically, ZigBee transceivers consume around 20-30mA while

communicating. This is too much if the sensor boards would be powered from

batteries and required the transceiver to be active all the time. One of the solutions

of this problem is to power the sensor boards from batteries and additionally charge

them using photovoltaic cells. Unfortunately this solution is quite expensive because

solar cells are addressed to generate energy from the sun light and when it comes to

work within the building, it is not so efficient.

A second solution able to reduce power consumption consists of turning on

the ZigBee module only when data between control and sensor boards needs to be

transmitted. ZigBee transceivers, while in standby mode, consume negligible power.

This can be done designing proper synchronization mechanism, able to manage

ZigBee modules, present in different sensor boards, so that they would be active

only for a while and not at the same time (Figure 35). Also a “beacon mechanism”,

described in the second chapter, available in ZigBee modules can be used.

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LIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM – GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS

39




FIGURE 35: TIMELINE SHOWING ACTIVE SENSORS .



3.5 WORKING AREAS

There is a wide variety of factory halls, some are small, others are large, some

have spots with daily light and others do not, thus it is incorrect to ensure uniform

lighting conditions for every factory hall. In order to provide better precision of

lighting control, the factory hall can be divided into few smaller areas, and provide

independent control of the lights in these areas (Figure 36). Each area, which also

can be called a sector, would possess its own sensor board, able to measure the

illumination conditions on that particular sector.

The user should have an opportunity to choose the number of sectors, which

would be most suitable for a specific factory hall. It is also adequate that the user

should be able to choose which lamps belong to each sector. On the figure below

there is an example of factory hall divided into five sectors with eight lamps each,

controlled by four independent contactors. Overall system design must consider the

specification of sectors and address light control adequately. This would make the

system flexible, easy to use and interesting for future clients.





FIGURE 36: FIGURE SHOWING SECTORS IN A FACTORY HALL.

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LIGHTING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

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{
rightHoldTemp++; // Incementing holdTemp
if(rightHoldTemp==40)
{
rightHold=1;
rightHoldState=1;
rightHoldTemp=0;
}
}
if(RA0==0&&rightLastState==1&&rightHoldState==1) // Checking if right button is pressed and if it was

pressed before
buttonTemp++;
if(RA1==0&&leftLastState==1&&leftHoldState==1) // Checking if left button is pressed and if it was
pressed before
buttonTemp--;
if(buttonTemp==105)
{
if(buttonCount<99)
buttonCount++;
buttonTemp=100;
}
if(buttonTemp==95)
{
if(buttonCount>0)
buttonCount--;
buttonTemp=100;
}

if(timer0==7)
{
timer0=0;
if(RA0!=0||RA1!=0)
{
if(RA1==0&&leftLastState==0) // Checking if left button is pressed and if it was not

pressed before
{
leftPressed=1;
leftLastState=1;
if(buttonCount>0)
{
buttonCount--;
buttonTemp=100;
}
}
if(RA0==0&&rightLastState==0) // Checking if right button is pressed and if it was
not pressed before
{
rightPressed=1;
rightLastState=1;
if(buttonCount<99)
{
buttonCount++;
buttonTemp=100;
}
}
}
}
if(RA0==1) // Checking if right button is released
{
rightPressed=0;
rightLastState=0;
rightHoldState=0;
rightHoldTemp=0;
rightHold=0;
T0IE=0;
}

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