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TitleLighted to Lighten: The Hope of India
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Table of Contents
                            FOREWORD
CONTENTS
	CHAPTER
		LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
	PREFACE
	TO-MORROW
	INTRODUCTION
	CHAPTER ONE
		YESTERDAY AND TO-DAY
	CHAPTER TWO
		AT SCHOOL
	A HIGH SCHOOL
	CHAPTER THREE
		I. THE GARDEN OF HID TREASURE
	LUCKNOW
		IN THE SECRET OF HIS PRESENCE
		FROM A STUDENT AT MADRAS WOMEN'S COLLEGE
	CHAPTER FOUR
		AN INTERNATIONAL ALLIANCE
		FROM A GRADUATE OF MADRAS CHRISTIAN COLLEGE
		EXTRACTS FROM A TEACHER'S JOURNAL IN MADRAS COLLEGE
	CHAPTER FIVE
		SENT FORTH TO HEAL
		AN EXAMPLE OF CHRISTIAN TREATMENT
	CHAPTER SIX
		WOMEN WHO DO THINGS
		MYERS
		THE END
		[ILLUSTRATION: A REPRESENTATIVE OF INDIA'S WOMANHOOD
	INDEX
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Page 61

is at stake. In short, the family circle is a world in miniature, with its own habits,
its own interests, and its own ties, largely independent of the great world that lies
outside. When the family is of such great importance, how much greater should
be the responsibilities of women in the ordering of that life? Is it not there in the
home that we develop most of our habits, our lines of thought and action?

"Even while keeping home, woman can do other kinds of work. She can help her
husband in his varied activities by showing interest and sympathy in all that he
does; she can influence him in every possible way. Then also she may do social
and religious work, and even teaching, though she has to manage a home. But

work that needs her keenest attention is in the home itself, in training up the
children. Happiness and cheerfulness in the home circle depend more or less on
the radiant face of the mother, as she performs her simple tasks, upon her
tenderness, on her unwearied willingness to surpass all boundaries in love. She is
the 'centre' of the family. The physical and moral training of her children falls to
her lot.

"Now, the developing of character is no light task, nor is it the least work that
has to be done. The family exists to train individuals for membership in a large
group. In the little family circle attention can be concentrated on a few who in
turn can go out and influence others. The family, therefore, is the nursery of all
human virtues and powers.

"In conclusion, expressing the same idea in stronger words, it is to be noted that
whether India shall maintain her self-government, when she receives it, depends
on how far the women are ready to fulfill the obligations laid upon them. This is
a great question and has to be decided by the educated women of India."

[Illustration: In the Laboratory, Madras]

[Illustration: Tennis Champions with Cup AT WORK AND PLAY]

One Reformer and What She Achieved.

Of the wealth of human interest that lies hidden in the life-stories of the one
hundred and ten students who make up the College, who has the insight to
speak? Coming from homes Hindu or Christian, conservative or liberal, from the
cosmopolitan atmosphere of the modern Indian city, or the far side of the jungle
villages, one might find in their home histories, in their thoughts and ambitions
and desires, a composite picture of the South Indian young womanhood of to-

Page 62

and desires, a composite picture of the South Indian young womanhood of to-
day. Countries as well as individuals pass through periods of adolescence, of
stress and strain and the pains of growth, when the old is merging in the new.
The student generation of India is passing through that phase to-day, and no one
who fails to grasp that fact can hope to understand the psychology of the present
day student.

In Pushpam's story it is possible to see something of that clash of old and new, of
that standing "between two worlds" that makes India's life to-day adventurous—
too adventurous at times for the comfort of the young discoverer.

Pushpam's home was in the jungle—by which is meant not the luxuriant forests
of your imagination, but the primitive country unbroken by the long ribbon of
the railway, where traffic proceeds at the rate of the lumbering, bamboo-roofed
bullock cart, and the unseemliness of Western haste is yet unknown. Twice a
week the postbag comes in on the shoulders of the loping runner.
Otherwise news travels only through the wireless telegraphy of bazaar gossip.
The village struggles out toward the irrigation tank and the white road, banyan-
shaded, whose dusty length ties its life loosely to that of the town thirty miles off
to the eastward. On the other side are palmyra-covered uplands, and then the
Hills.

The Good News sometimes runs faster than railway and telegraph. Here it is so,
for the village has been solidly Christian for fifty years. Its people are not
outcastes, but substantial landowners, conservative in their indigenous ways, yet
sending out their sons and daughters to school and college and professional life.

Of that village Pushpam's father is the teacher-catechist, a gentle, white-haired
man, who long ago set up his rule of benevolent autocracy, "for the good of the
governed."

"To this child God has given sense; he shall go to the high school in the town."
The catechist speaks with the conviction of a Scotch Dominie who has
discovered a child "of parts," and resistance on the part of the parent is vain. The
Dominie's own twelve are all children "of parts" and all have left the thatched
schoolhouse for the education of the city.

Pushpam is the youngest. Term after term finds her leaving the village, jogging
the thirty miles of dust-white road to the town, spending the night in the crowded
discomfort of the third class compartment K marked for "Indian females."
Vacation after vacation finds her reversing the order of journeying, plunging

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