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TitleLight attraction of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner)
LanguageEnglish
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Page 1

Light attraction of the Indian meal moth, Plodia
interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae),

and regional spectral sensitivity of its
compound eye


by


Thomas Cowan
BSc Trent University 1998




THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF
THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF


MASTER OF PEST MANAGEMENT




In the
Department of Biological Sciences




© Thomas Cowan 2009


SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY


Summer 2009




All rights reserved. This work may not be
reproduced in whole or in part, by photocopy

or other means, without permission of the author.

Page 2

ii

Approval

Name: Thomas Cowan

Degree: Master of Pest Management

Title of Thesis: Light attraction of the Indian meal moth, Plodia
interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), and
regional spectral sensitivity of its compound eye



Examining Committee:

Chair: Dr. Rolf. Mathewes
Professor, Department of Biological Sciences,
S.F.U.





______________________________________

Dr. G. Gries, Professor, Senior Supervisor
Department of Biological Sciences, S.F.U.





______________________________________

Dr. I. Novales Flamarique, Associate Professor,
Department of Biological Sciences, S.F.U.




______________________________________

Dr. G. J. R. Judd, Research Scientist,
Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre,
Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
Public Examiner











Date Defended/Approved: July_30_2009

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violet and UV wavelengths are more attractive in combination than on their own.

Two different experimental designs were deployed. The first design tested one

405-nm LED (132 µW/cm2) and one 350-nm LED (68 µW/cm2) with a combined

light intensity of 200 µW/cm2/trap as the treatment stimulus versus a control

stimulus that consisted of two 350-nm LEDs with a combined light intensity of

200 µW/cm2/trap (integrated from 300–450 nm) for attraction of males (Exp. 10,

n = 10), virgin females (Exp. 11, n = 10), and mated females (Exp. 12, n = 10).

The second design tested the same treatment stimulus versus a control stimulus

that consisted of two 405-nm LEDs with a combined light intensity of

200 µW/cm2/trap (integrated from 300–450 nm) for attraction of mated females

(Exp. 14, n = 10). Only mated females were tested for the second design

because mated females appeared to respond best in preceding experiments.

Emission of the 405-nm wavelength at intensities twice as high as the UV

wavelength in combined light sources was based on proportionally higher levels

of violet light at sunset and twilight (Robertson, 1966; Johnsen et al., 2006).

In experiments 10–12, the two 350-nm LEDs attracted as many males,

virgin females and mated females as did the 350- and 405-nm LEDs in

combination (Figure 7). In experiment 13, the two 405-nm LEDs attracted as

many gravid females as the combined 350- and 405-nm LEDs (Figure 7).

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Figure 7 Mean (+ SE) percent of male, virgin female and mated female Plodia

interpunctella responding in two-choice experiments 10–13 to

combinations of light emitting diodes (LEDs), emitting ultraviolet and

violet light at peak wavelengths of 350 nm and 405 nm. Additional

information is provided in the caption of figure 4. In each experiment,

bars with the same letter are not statistically different (Wilcoxin rank

sum test: P < 0.05).

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