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10th World Down Syndrome Congress
Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
19th - 22nd August 2009

LIFELONG LIVING AND LEARNING
Bringing together the international Down Syndrome Community

aBSTRACTS AND PROCEEDINGS

Down Syndrome Education International helps more
than 80,000 people in over 180 countries every year.

Our pioneering scientific research, practical publications,
training, consulting and outreach services deliver effective
support to thousands of families, professionals and
organisations every day.

Our work creates better learning opportunities,
transforming the lives of many thousands of young
people with Down syndrome.

Find out more about what we can do for you.

Visit our exhibition stand or www.downsed.org

Down Syndrome Education International Down Syndrome Education USA
www.downsed.org www.downsedusa.org

The Sarah Duffen Centre 1451 Quail Street, Suite 104
Belmont Street Newport Beach
Southsea PO5 1NA California 92660-2747
UK USA

Email [email protected] Email [email protected]
Tel +44 23 9285 5330 Tel +1 949 757 1877

UK registered charity no. 1062823 A US 501(c)(3) nonprofit

Moscow, Russia, 2008 Chennai, India, 2008

Sacramento, USA, 2009

Chennai, India, 2008

Misore, India, 2008Kyiv, Ukraine, 2008

Chennai, India, 2008

Sarajevo, Bosnia, 2009

Portsmouth, UK, 2009

Manchester, UK, 2009

New online stores now open
For shipping from UK: shop.downsed.com

For shipping from the US: store.downsedusa.org

10th W
orld Dow

n Syndrom
e Congress Abstracts and Proceedings

Page 2

Hosted by

sid
Down

Syndrome
International

www.downsed.org

Local Organising Committee

Pat Clarke (Chair)

Margaret Carroll, Caroline Casey, Richard Connolly, May Gannon, Grainne Murphy, Ingrid Murphy,

Dr Joan Murphy, Mary O’Reilly, Christina Riordan, Penny Robertson, Vanessa Dos Santos

Scientific Committee

Professor Hilary Hoey (Chair)

Professor Sue Buckley, Dr Jacob Burack, Dr Joan Murphy (Hon Secretary), Professor Juan Perera,

Professor David Patterson, Dr Dan Weeks, Mr Pat Clarke, Mrs Penny Robertson

DSInternational Advisory Committee

Kitt Boel, Professor Roy Brown, Dr Jacob Burack, Pat Clarke (Vice-President),

Assoc-Prof. Monica Cuskelly, Marja Hodes, Dawn McKenna (Treasurer), Dr Eiichi Momotani,

Professor David Patterson, Rehka Ramachandra, Penny Robertson (President), Vanessa Dos Santos

(Secretary), Dr Balbir Singh, Bridget Snedden, Dr Dan Weeks, Paul Zanon (Company Secretary)



Page 1 of 1

05/08/2009file://C:\Users\Linda.Hall\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Fil...

under the auspices of
Down Syndrome International

hosted by
Down Sydrome Ireland

Sponsors
Dept of the Taoiseach • Dept of Health and Children • The National Children’s Hospital
Foundation Board • AMNCH, Tallaght • The Iris O’Brien Foundation • Trinity College
Dublin • Tipperary Water • Fáilte Ireland • Guinness Store House • Caffrey Natural Stone
Ltd • Logo Motion Ltd • McConnell’s Advertising • Bambury Bookmakers

sid
Down

Syndrome
International

Host Organisation Congress Secretariat

Down Syndrome Ireland Keynote PCO

City Link Business Park 26 Anglesea House

Old Naas Road 63 Carysfort Avenue

Dublin 12 Blackrock

Tel: +353 1 4266500 Co Dublin

Fax: +353 1 4266501 Tel: +353 1 4003626

E-Mail [email protected] Fax +353 1 4003692

Web www.downsyndrome.ie E-mail [email protected]

Web www.keynotepco.ie

� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ���������
We are very grateful to all the members of the Scientific Committee for their help and support
with the Scientific Programme and to Ms Christina Riordan, Office Manager, and the office team,
Down Syndrome Ireland, for their invaluable help and administrative assistance


©Copyright 2009 Down Syndrome Ireland. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may
be reproduced, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, or stored in a retrieval system of any
nature, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Any person who does any
unauthorised act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil
claims for damages


Developed, Edited and Designed by Dr. Joan Murphy (Hon Secretary, WDSC2009 Scientific Committee)


Typeset, printed and distributed by DownsEd Limited, The Sarah Duffen Centre, Belmont Street,
Southsea, Port Hampshire, P05 INA, UK

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Page 55

abstracts

47

inclusion and to further develop their own strategies and techniques.

This information will benefit personnel from mainstream schools, as well as parents
with intellectual disabilities who are being educated in a mainstream school.



Mastering The Art Of Multi-Level Teaching ... The Key To Life
Long Learning
Engelbrecht, A. & Swanepoel, H., Gauteng Department Of Education, SOUTH AFRICA
& USA

O78 BS QG13

In order to become a life-long learner, the learner with Down syndrome has to
perceive learning at school level as truly meaningful - not necessarily on academic
level, but especially at interpersonal levels. This can be achieved by learning together
with the diversity within his own peer group, but at his own level of competence in
different learning areas.

To be able to modify the content of a specific lesson, whilst working in the same
context as the rest of the class.

An example lesson (Mathematics - from the planning phase through to the presenting
and actual recording and reporting of outcomes to parents and other stakeholders)
will be presented to attendees.

The emphasis will be on including the learner with intellectual impairment in a
mainstream class of 35-40 learners with a wide range of learning needs.

The attendee will realize that:

- multi-level teaching practices do not only promote inclusion of learners with
diverse learning needs, but even more importantly:

- it opens up endless opportunities for life-long learning as the learner now
perceives learning not only as an academic endeavor (at a much lower level as his
peers,) but as a socially uplifting activity.

ONE SIZE (a specific lesson) CAN FIT ALL....

you just need to be skilled - and willing - to alter the sizes

(plan, present, assess, record and report on different levels - but clinging to the same
context)



Inclusion Vs Integration
Bryan Harman, Canadian Down Syndrome Society, CANADA

O79 BS QG13

All children deserve to be welcomed in their neighbourhood schools. The United
Nations stated in March 2007 that inclusive education was a right of all people. This
is a shift in ideology from special education classrooms to educating all students
within an inclusive classroom. As children with labels and disabilities enter the
education system, the terms ‘integrated’ and ‘included’ are used to describe the
classroom settings they will experience.

For all children to be able to exercise their right to an inclusive education, there must

difference is that integration models work under the premise that something is
wrong with the child and needs to be fixed. Inclusion works under the premise that

Inclusion is an attitude, a value and belief system. All students are encouraged to
belong, thus nurturing everyone’s self esteem. In inclusion, students are ‘participating’
in school, as opposed to integration, where students are ‘going’ to school. Inclusion is
really a function of relationships and attitudes.

Inclusion benefits everyone. Integration simply accommodates and benefits no one.

Students with ’typical’ abilities, teachers, students with ‘different’ abilities, parents

inclusive attitude.

Understanding that children are not broken, (integration), will allow inclusion to
become a reality. Schools need to learn as well as teach and realize that successful
inclusion will support all children reaching their potential.

Individualized Academic Intervention For Adults With Down
Syndrome: Assessing Progress Over Time
Melissa L. Rowe, Ph.D. (Down Syndrome Of Louisville, Louisville KY), USA

O80 BS QG13

Many young adults with DS experience a decline in academic skills after high school
due to both a lack of post-secondary educational opportunities for adults with
intellectual disabilities as well as decreased opportunities to utilize these skills in the
real world. In hopes to reduce and/or prevent these declines, we designed a weekly
academic intervention program for adults with DS. This presentation will discuss the
program design, student goals and progress, and statistical findings.

To assess the change in adults with DS in both standardized scores and general level
of academic performance over the course of a 5-year period while enrolled in our
program.

A longitudinal study of 21 young adults with DS was conducted at Down Syndrome
of Louisville’s Adult Literacy Program. Standardized assessments of academic
achievement as well as general cognitive ability (i.e., IQ) were obtained once per year
over the course of three to five years (depending on the student’s enrollment date).

Data analysed that compared students’ pre-enrollment standardized achievement
scores to those obtained three or more years later revealed a significant difference
between the two time points (p<.05). In addition, all 21 students either remained
the same or increased in score on both the achievement and IQ tests (i.e., no students
regressed). Multiple other analyses were conducted and will be discussed.

These results indicate a great benefit to ongoing academic intervention for adults
with DS. Not only did academic skill significantly increase in these individuals, but
scores of general intellectual ability also increased.



‘Before and After’ with Violin Recital
Emmanuel Bishop, USA

O81 BS QG27

“Before and After” shows the life of a 12-year-old self-advocate boy with Down
syndrome: his interests and accomplishments in sports, music and academics. Golf,
biking, violin, swimming, etc. video clips will be shown.

1. Highlight the abilities in Down syndrome. 2. Counteract the low expectations in
Down syndrome. 3. Show that the joy of living does not preclude individuals with
Down syndrome.



Pilot Study: ‘A Friend In Need...’ The Challenges Of
Friendships For Adolescents And Young Adults With
Intellectual Disability Who Live In Rural Tasmania
Zournazis, H., Harris, M., Dr. Orpin, P., (University Department Of Rural Health,
Tasmania), University Department Of Rural Health, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA

O82 BS QG27

Friendship formation is an essential element for well-being, especially in the

Abstracts-book-Inside-FINAL.indd 47 04/08/2009 09:34:53

Page 56

abstracts

48

development of one’s identity during adolescence. Adolescents/young adults with
intellectual disability (ID) are faced with significant additional barriers in their
formation and maintenance of friendships, particularly for those who live in rural
environments where there are fewer choices and opportunities.

There is a growing amount of literature exploring the social networks and
relationships of individuals with (ID) but little about the issues faced by those who
live in rural environments.

The study explores this gap in the literature.

This study used an interpretative qualitative research approach. Seven face to
face in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents/ carers of
adolescents/ young adults with mild, moderate and severe intellectual disability
who live in rural Tasmania. This method was employed to provide a perspective not
well covered in previous studies.

Parents/carers highlighted the limited services that reduced opportunities for
formation and maintenance of friendships. Isolation and mobility issues in rural
areas contributed to an increased need for parental involvement. Nevertheless,
those parents/ carers who were themselves highly socially connected, stated
their adolescent/ young adult with ID had extensive social networks and support.
Most parents/ carers claimed the importance of friendships as they contributed to
increased happiness and reduced loneliness.

Living in a rural environment compounds the many issues that individuals with ID
face in the establishment and maintenance of friendships. This study provides a
platform for a larger more representative study.



Fighting Isolation
Leonora Sh(1), Myrvete K(2), Shqipe S(3), (1) Parent Support Group Of Down
Syndrome Association Of Republic Of Kosova (Western Balkan) (Ngo Dsk), (2)
Pediatric Clinic, University Centre Of Clinics Kosova. (3) Down Syndrome Resource
Center Prishtina, Ngo Dsk, Down Syndrome Association Of Kosova, ALBANIA

O83 BS QG27

Parents of the children with Down Syndrome (DS) in Kosovo, as result of lack of
information find themselves in situation without any hope or alternatives. Lack of
information in general on how the individuals with DS should be treated has led the
community of 516 members (regarding NGO DSK data base) in complete isolation,
without hope or alternatives.

Persons with DS in Kosovo are isolated a part of society which is not presently being
serviced by any relevant institutions or NGO’s. Inclusion of individuals with Down
Syndrome into the community is a meaningful contribution for everybody.

Since established of association (4th march 2007), several activities were taken place
from parents, professionals and strong-minded people by increase the mobilization
of community with DS, increase the level of interest of educational authorities and
increasing awareness to society.

Four children with DS were register into regular primary school; nine to public
kindergarten, fifty-two new parents of infants with DS were equipped with
information from experienced mother in first weeks. Two programme were designed,
the early education programme and Programme X 21. From first programme are
benefiting 76 children under age 9 through three resources centers of NGO DSK.

The programme, X 21, consisted of three components, as follows: Training for the
coffee preparer and waiter, decorative workshop and premises where the parents,
professionals, students and interested media can meet and communicate. Presently,
the programme is fully staffed with four youngsters/adults with Down syndrome
aged from 19 to 24 years old.

By ‘fighting the isolation’, wrong stereotypes and an old fashioned mentality are
commonly expressed concerning DS in Kosovo. The establishment of a place/premise

where interested guests would be served and discuss with the DS persons themselves
will work to eliminate these old notions about DS in Kosovo.

“Stepping In Cinderella’s Shoes “: A Young Girl’s Quest For
Identity And Empowerment
Esther Joosa, National Institute Of Education, SINGAPORE

O84 BS QG27

In make belief play young children assume roles. In this way they tell others who
they are and what they want to be. The process of role-taking is important in the
formation of identity and a key means to empowerment. While there is an increased
focus on understanding the role of dramatic play in the development of agency and
identity in early childhood, there is little awareness of similar processes with young
individuals with Down syndrome.

Set against a backdrop of the author’s art program, this presentation provides an
insight in the world of an eight-year old young girl with Down syndrome, her make-
belief play and interactions with author. It aims to highlight the possibilities of
dramatic play in social and emotional development.

Based on socio-cultural perspectives, this qualitative investigation makes use of a
critical cultural discourse analysis framework in order to examine and analyze the
participant’s quest for on power roles.

The findings show an intricate interplay of participant and author on issues of
agency and identity. It shows the ability of the participant to take on different roles
and to understand the social rules related to these roles. It further brings forward the
importance of responses.

The investigation draws attention to several intertwined issues, the need to
understand the power of dramatic play, the nature of the meaning making process
as well as the importance to include young children with Down syndrome in
discussions on concepts such as agency and identity.



“The Rarely Heard Voice”: Students With Moderate General
Learning Disabilities Share Their Experiences Of Friendship
In Mainstream Schools
Dr Michael O’Keeffe, Department Of Special Education, IRELAND

O85 BS QG27

This presentation will focus on how students with a Moderate General Learning
Disability experience friendship in mainstream schools. Having close friends is
a fundamental need for most people. It is satisfying to have close friendships
with others as they serve to enrich one’s life. Many writers would even claim that
friendships are in fact, the single most important factor influencing a person’s
quality of life.

Using a compendium of innovative methods six students, including five with Down
syndrome, in five different mainstream schools share their experiences of friendship.
These are outlined in this presentation and the ‘voice’ of the student is privileged at
all times.

Consideration is also given to the steps that schools take that promote or inhibit
the formation of friendships between this group of students and their mainstream
peers.



Abstracts-book-Inside-FINAL.indd 48 04/08/2009 09:34:53

Page 109

Hosted by

sid
Down

Syndrome
International

www.downsed.org

Local Organising Committee

Pat Clarke (Chair)

Margaret Carroll, Caroline Casey, Richard Connolly, May Gannon, Grainne Murphy, Ingrid Murphy,

Dr Joan Murphy, Mary O’Reilly, Christina Riordan, Penny Robertson, Vanessa Dos Santos

Scientific Committee

Professor Hilary Hoey (Chair)

Professor Sue Buckley, Dr Jacob Burack, Dr Joan Murphy (Hon Secretary), Professor Juan Perera,

Professor David Patterson, Dr Dan Weeks, Mr Pat Clarke, Mrs Penny Robertson

DSInternational Advisory Committee

Kitt Boel, Professor Roy Brown, Dr Jacob Burack, Pat Clarke (Vice-President),

Assoc-Prof. Monica Cuskelly, Marja Hodes, Dawn McKenna (Treasurer), Dr Eiichi Momotani,

Professor David Patterson, Rehka Ramachandra, Penny Robertson (President), Vanessa Dos Santos

(Secretary), Dr Balbir Singh, Bridget Snedden, Dr Dan Weeks, Paul Zanon (Company Secretary)



Page 1 of 1

05/08/2009file://C:\Users\Linda.Hall\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Fil...

under the auspices of
Down Syndrome International

hosted by
Down Sydrome Ireland

Sponsors
Dept of the Taoiseach • Dept of Health and Children • The National Children’s Hospital
Foundation Board • AMNCH, Tallaght • The Iris O’Brien Foundation • Trinity College
Dublin • Tipperary Water • Fáilte Ireland • Guinness Store House • Caffrey Natural Stone
Ltd • Logo Motion Ltd • McConnell’s Advertising • Bambury Bookmakers

sid
Down

Syndrome
International

Host Organisation Congress Secretariat

Down Syndrome Ireland Keynote PCO

City Link Business Park 26 Anglesea House

Old Naas Road 63 Carysfort Avenue

Dublin 12 Blackrock

Tel: +353 1 4266500 Co Dublin

Fax: +353 1 4266501 Tel: +353 1 4003626

E-Mail [email protected] Fax +353 1 4003692

Web www.downsyndrome.ie E-mail [email protected]

Web www.keynotepco.ie

We are very grateful to all the members of the Scientific Committe for all their help and support
with the Scientific Programme and to Ms Christina Riordan, Office Manager, Down Syndrome Ireland,
for her invaluable help and administrative assistance

©Copyright 2009 Down Syndrome Ireland. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be
reproduced, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, or stored in a retrieval system of
any nature, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Any person who does any
unauthorised act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and
civil claims for damages

Developed, Edited and Designed by Dr. Joan Murphy (Hon Secretary, WDSC2009 Scientific Committee)

Typeset, printed and distributed by DownsEd Limited, The Sarah Duffen Centre, Belmont Street, Southsea,
PortHampshire, P05 INA, UK

Page 110

10th World Down Syndrome Congress
Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
19th - 22nd August 2009

LIFELONG LIVING AND LEARNING
Bringing together the international Down Syndrome Community

aBSTRACTS AND PROCEEDINGS

Down Syndrome Education International helps more
than 80,000 people in over 180 countries every year.

Our pioneering scientific research, practical publications,
training, consulting and outreach services deliver effective
support to thousands of families, professionals and
organisations every day.

Our work creates better learning opportunities,
transforming the lives of many thousands of young
people with Down syndrome.

Find out more about what we can do for you.

Visit our exhibition stand or www.downsed.org

Down Syndrome Education International Down Syndrome Education USA
www.downsed.org www.downsedusa.org

The Sarah Duffen Centre 1451 Quail Street, Suite 104
Belmont Street Newport Beach
Southsea PO5 1NA California 92660-2747
UK USA

Email [email protected] Email [email protected]
Tel +44 23 9285 5330 Tel +1 949 757 1877

UK registered charity no. 1062823 A US 501(c)(3) nonprofit

Moscow, Russia, 2008 Chennai, India, 2008

Sacramento, USA, 2009

Chennai, India, 2008

Misore, India, 2008Kyiv, Ukraine, 2008

Chennai, India, 2008

Sarajevo, Bosnia, 2009

Portsmouth, UK, 2009

Manchester, UK, 2009

New online stores now open
For shipping from UK: shop.downsed.com

For shipping from the US: store.downsedusa.org

10th W
orld Dow

n Syndrom
e Congress Abstracts and Proceedings

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