Download Lesson (pdf) PDF

TitleLesson (pdf)
LanguageEnglish
File Size278.6 KB
Total Pages42
Table of Contents
                            Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
Page 9
Page 10
Page 11
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 15
Page 16
Page 17
Page 18
Page 19
Page 20
Page 21
Page 22
Page 23
Page 24
Page 25
Page 26
Page 27
Page 28
Page 29
Page 30
Page 31
Page 32
Page 33
Page 34
Page 35
Page 36
Page 37
Page 38
Page 39
Page 40
Page 41
Page 42
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Consumer­and­Producer­Surplus (1).notebook

1

February 08, 2016

Feb 17­3:01 PM

Consumer and Producer Surplus

Consumer and Producer Surplus

Slide 5 ­ Discuss the difference between willingness to pay and the actual price paid. Notice different 
consumers value the bottled water differently. 

Slide 6 ­ Tell the students that the slide is a graphical representation of the information on slide 6. Tell the 
students that although it is a stepped line, economists call it a demand curve.

Slide 7 ­ Answers provided for slide 7.

Slide 8 ­ Slide shade up to a price of $2.50 so that only those paying more than $2.50 are showing: 
Mycah, Emma, Jacob, and Isabella.

Slide 9 ­ Includes a red line showing the price. Ask students which consumers would not buy the bottled 
water.

Slide 10 ­ Explain that Rachel and Ethan would choose not to buy the bottled water because the are not 
willing pay $2.50. Or, they value the water less than the price of the water.

Slide 11 ­ Discuss the definition of consumer surplus with students. Have students calculate the 
consumer surplus for each character. Click on the individual shades to reveal answers.

Slide 12 ­ The entire market includes many potential buyers ­ because of the larger number of buyers, the 
stepped line becomes smooth. This line is the demand curve. The area above the price line and below the 
demand curve reflects the difference between what consumers are willing to pay and what they actually 
pay ­ it is the consumer surplus.

Page 2

Consumer­and­Producer­Surplus (1).notebook

2

February 08, 2016

Mar 24­12:34 PM

Slide 13 ­ Because the shape is a triangle, use the formula to calculate the area of a triangle to 
calculate the value of the consumer surplus.

Slide 14 ­ Have students calculate the answer.

Slide 15 ­ Answer revealed. Consumer surplus is $3,200.

Slide 16 ­ The price has decreased to $2. Point out that this affects two groups. The consumers who 
would have purchased gadgets at $3 are gaining extra consumer surplus. In addition, at the lower 
price new buyers are willing to purchase an additional one hundred gadgets.

Slide 17 ­ Shows how the extra consumer surplus is allocated between existing and new customers.

Slide 18 ­ Calculate the increase in consumer surplus acquired by existing buyers (those who were 
also willing to buy at $3).

Slide 19 ­ Answer revealed. Consumer surplus is $800.

Slide 20 ­ Calculate the increase in consumer surplus resulting from new buyers.

Slide 21 ­ Answer revealed. Consumer surplus is $50.

Slide 22 ­ Using previous information, find the total increase in consumer surplus. Click the shades to 
reveal answers.

Page 21

Consumer­and­Producer­Surplus (1).notebook

21

February 08, 2016

Mar 24­12:34 PM

Consumer SurplusPrice

1
2
3

4
5

6
7
8

9
10

11

1110987654321

Quantity of Gadgets (hundreds)

Use the area of the green triangle to 
find the increased consumer surplus 
to existing buyers.

area = .5(base)(height)

consumer surplus = 

consumer surplus = 

.5(100)(10)

$50

Page 22

Consumer­and­Producer­Surplus (1).notebook

22

February 08, 2016

Mar 24­12:34 PM

Consumer SurplusPrice

1
2
3

4
5

6
7
8

9
10

11

1110987654321

Quantity of Gadgets (hundreds)

Use the chart to summarize what happens as a result of a $1 decrease in price.
• For existing consumers? For new consumers?  
• Total increase in consumer surplus?

 change

existing consumers 

new consumers 

total increase

Page 41

Consumer­and­Producer­Surplus (1).notebook

41

February 08, 2016

Mar 24­12:34 PM

Price

1
2
3

4
5

6
7
8

9
10

11

1110987654321

Quantity of Gadgets (hundreds)

Producer Surplus

consumer surplus 

producer surplus 

total economic surplus 

Consumer Surplus

13

12

Page 42

Consumer­and­Producer­Surplus (1).notebook

42

February 08, 2016

Mar 24­12:34 PM

Conclusions

• Consumer surplus is the difference between what consumers are 
willing to pay and what they actually pay.

• Consumer surplus can be found in the area above the price and below 
the demand curve.

• Consumer surplus can be calculated using the formula for the area of a 
triangle.

• Producer surplus is the difference between the price received and 
the seller's cost.

• Producer surplus can be found in the area below the price and above 
the supply curve.

• Producer surplus can be calculated using the formula for the area of a 
triangle.

Similer Documents