Download Leading Smart Transformation: A Roadmap for World Class Government PDF

TitleLeading Smart Transformation: A Roadmap for World Class Government
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.6 MB
Total Pages255
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Half Title
Title
Copyright
Contents
Foreword
About the authors
Introduction
Part I The Context for Change
	1 Leading through vision
	2 Managing stakeholders
	3 Driving the transformation
Part II The Transformational Cycle
	4 Setting the strategy
	5 Designing the operating model
	6 Developing talent
	7 Making it happen
Part III The X-Factor
	8 Distilling the X-factor
	9 Navigating the roadmap
Notes
Further Reading
Acknowledgments
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Leading Smart Transformation

9780230_243729_01_prexxiv.indd i9780230_243729_01_prexxiv.indd i 1/16/2011 5:24:00 PM1/16/2011 5:24:00 PM

10.1057/9780230306493 - Leading Smart Transformation, Andrew Kakabadse, Mohammad Omar Abdulla, Rabih Abouchakra and Ali Jawad

C
o

p
y
ri

g
h

t
m

a
te

ri
a
l
fr

o
m

w
w

w
.p

a
lg

ra
v
e
c
o

n
n

e
c
t.

c
o

m
-

l
ic

e
n

s
e
d

t
o

E
T

H
Z

u
e
ri

c
h

-
P

a
lg

ra
v
e
C

o
n

n
e
c
t

-
2
0
1
1
-0

4
-0

1

Page 127

102 Leading smart transformation

it advocated that peripheral processes and by implication periph-
eral employees should be stripped away.

To start the revolution, it was suggested that organizations
take a blank piece of paper and map out their processes. This
is undoubtedly a useful exercise. It encourages organizations
to consider exactly what are their core activities and what pro-
cesses are in place, and need to be in place, to deliver them effi-
ciently. It also encourages organizations to move beyond strict
functional demarcations to more free-flowing organizational
forms governed by key processes rather than fiefdoms.

Inevitably, the optimum processes involved more effective uti-
lization of resources. Functional organizations (as opposed to
process-based ones) tend to contain elements of self-serving
protectionism. Different functions do not necessarily share
knowledge or work to the same objectives as other functions.
Clearly this is, at best, inefficient. As a result, some stages in
processes are eliminated completely. Others are streamlined
or made more effective through the use of information tech-
nology. Having come up with a neatly engineered map of how
their organizations should operate, government departments
and other organizations can then attempt to translate the paper
theory into concrete reality.

The blank piece of paper problem

While its relative simplicity makes it alluring, actually turning
reengineering or BPM for that matter into reality is more dif-
ficult than its proponents suggested.

The first problem is that the blank piece of paper ignores the
years, often decades, of cultural evolution which led to an
organization doing something in a certain way. Such precon-
ceptions, and often justifiable habits, are not easily discarded.
Functional fiefdoms may be inefficient, but they are difficult to
break down.

The second problem is that reengineering can appear inhumane.
Reengineering, as the name suggests, owes more to visions
of the organization as a machine than a human, or humane,

9780230_243729_06_cha05.indd 1029780230_243729_06_cha05.indd 102 1/16/2011 5:23:43 PM1/16/2011 5:23:43 PM

10.1057/9780230306493 - Leading Smart Transformation, Andrew Kakabadse, Mohammad Omar Abdulla, Rabih Abouchakra and Ali Jawad

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
m

a
te

ri
a
l f

ro
m

w
w

w
.p

a
lg

ra
ve

co
n
n
e
ct

.c
o
m

-
li

ce
n
se

d
t
o
E

T
H

Z
u
e
ri
ch

-
P

a
lg

ra
ve

C
o
n
n
e
ct

-
2

0
1
1
-0

4
-0

1

Page 128

103Designing the operating model

system. The human side of reengineering has proved its great-
est stumbling block. To reengineering purists, people are objects
who handle processes. Depersonalization is seen as the route
to efficiency. (Here, the echoes of Frederick Taylor’s manage-
ment by dictatorship are most obvious.) Similarly, BPM with
its emphasis on using technology has also been criticized for
dehumanizing work.

The third obstacle is that government organizations and the
civil servants who populate them are not natural revolutionar-
ies. Instead of casting the reengineering net widely they tend to
reengineer the most readily accessible process and then leave it
at that. Related to this, reengineering usually fails to impinge
on management. Not surprisingly, managers are all too willing
to impose the rigors of a process-based view of the organiza-
tion on others, but often unwilling to inflict it upon themselves.
In response, James Champy has suggested that reengineering
management should tackle three key areas: managerial roles,
managerial styles, and managerial systems.

Case study: Reinventing the Bank

As an organizational example, let us consider the story of the
UK’s Financial Services Authority (FSA).

In the general election of May 1997, the new Labour govern-
ment swept to power in the UK with an overwhelming major-
ity. One of the new government’s first bold actions was to make
the Bank of England independent to set monetary policy. In
effect, the new government was restoring the Bank of England’s
freedom from political interference that had been lost when the
Bank was nationalized in 1946. Within three weeks of coming to
power, the new government also announced that the eight exist-
ing financial regulators in the UK would be merged. In the pro-
cess the Bank of England would lose responsibility for banking
supervision, leaving it free to pursue its primary aim of setting
monetary policy.

At the time, the new regulator did not have a name—it started
life under the title of Newco—and had only one employee—its
first chairman and chief executive, Howard Davies. In June 2008,

9780230_243729_06_cha05.indd 1039780230_243729_06_cha05.indd 103 1/16/2011 5:23:43 PM1/16/2011 5:23:43 PM

10.1057/9780230306493 - Leading Smart Transformation, Andrew Kakabadse, Mohammad Omar Abdulla, Rabih Abouchakra and Ali Jawad

C
o

p
y
ri

g
h

t
m

a
te

ri
a
l
fr

o
m

w
w

w
.p

a
lg

ra
v
e
c
o

n
n

e
c
t.

c
o

m
-

l
ic

e
n

s
e
d

t
o

E
T

H
Z

u
e
ri

c
h

-
P

a
lg

ra
v
e
C

o
n

n
e
c
t

-
2
0
1
1
-0

4
-0

1

Page 254

229Index

Ullsten, Ola, 42
United Kingdom, 16–20, 37

business environment, 70
Financial Services Authority (FSA),

103–8
governance model, 43
multiagency collaboration in, 108
Third Way, 81

United States
business environment, 70
IRS, 160–7

US Constitution, 35

value
arbiters of, 49–51
public, 30–4, 49–51
shareholder, 78–80

values, 7
visibility, 132–3
vision

of Abu Dhabi, 13–14, 16, 68, 191–3
benefits of, 7
of Botswana, 12–13
cascading, 15–18
clarity of, 16–17

departmental, 14–15
future and, 12–13
for IRS, 163
leadership and, 18–20, 40, 199–201
of Malaysia, 12
national, 8–14, 16
readiness for change and, 4–6
of Singapore, 9–11, 14–16
of value, 33–4

Walker, Dave, 123–5
Walters, Jonathan, 126
Whiskey Rebellion, 160
wicked issues, 107–8
Wilson, Harold, 176
Wilson, Woodrow, 1
work environment, 118
World Bank, 85
world citizenship, 188

X-factor, 171–98, 210–11

Yas Island, 4, 214n5

Zayed bin Sultan al Nahyan, 190

9780230_243729_14_ind.indd 2299780230_243729_14_ind.indd 229 1/19/2011 2:00:27 PM1/19/2011 2:00:27 PM

10.1057/9780230306493 - Leading Smart Transformation, Andrew Kakabadse, Mohammad Omar Abdulla, Rabih Abouchakra and Ali Jawad

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
m

a
te

ri
a
l f

ro
m

w
w

w
.p

a
lg

ra
ve

co
n
n
e
ct

.c
o
m

-
li

ce
n
se

d
t
o
E

T
H

Z
u
e
ri
ch

-
P

a
lg

ra
ve

C
o
n
n
e
ct

-
2

0
1
1
-0

4
-0

1

Page 255

9780230_243729_14_ind.indd 2309780230_243729_14_ind.indd 230 1/19/2011 2:00:27 PM1/19/2011 2:00:27 PM

10.1057/9780230306493 - Leading Smart Transformation, Andrew Kakabadse, Mohammad Omar Abdulla, Rabih Abouchakra and Ali Jawad

C
o

p
y
ri

g
h

t
m

a
te

ri
a
l
fr

o
m

w
w

w
.p

a
lg

ra
v
e
c
o

n
n

e
c
t.

c
o

m
-

l
ic

e
n

s
e
d

t
o

E
T

H
Z

u
e
ri

c
h

-
P

a
lg

ra
v
e
C

o
n

n
e
c
t

-
2
0
1
1
-0

4
-0

1

Similer Documents