Download Leading For Educational Lives: Inviting and Sustaining Imaginative Acts of Hope in a Connected PDF

TitleLeading For Educational Lives: Inviting and Sustaining Imaginative Acts of Hope in a Connected
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.5 MB
Total Pages209
Table of Contents
                            TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INTRODUCTION
PART 1:EDUCATIONAL LIVES SEEN FROM AN INVITING PERSPECTIVE
	CHAPTER 1: EDUCATION MATTERS, REALLY
		WORDS MATTER
		EDUCATIONAL LIVING MATTERS
		IDEALS AND INSTITUTIONS MATTER
		ORCHESTRATING IDEALS AND CONVENTIONS MATTER
		COMPARISONS MATTER
		STRUCTURES MATTER
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 2: THE INVITING PERSPECTIVE
		LEADING WITH INTEGRITY
		PERSPECTIVES ON PERSPECTIVES
		MEANINGFUL MESSAGES
		LIVING FOUNDATIONS
			Democratic Ethos
			The Perceptual Tradition
			Self-Concept Theory
		WORKING WITH INVITATIONS
		AREAS OF INVITING
			Inviting Oneself Personally
			Inviting Others Personally
			Inviting Oneself Professionally
			Inviting Others Professionally
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
PART 2: IMAGINATIVELY LEADING, MANAGING, AND MENTORING EDUCATIONAL LIVES
	CHAPTER 3: LEADING FROM THE INSIDE OUT
		CORE AUTHENTICITY
		ESCAPING REALITY
		METAPERCEPTIONS
		UNDERSTANDING SELF-SYSTEMS
		THE IMPORTANCE OF EXPERIENCE
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 4: MANAGING AND MENTORING YOUR EDUCATIONAL SELF
		THE IMPORTANCE OF CHOICES
		DEVELOPING PRACTICAL WISDOM
		EDUCATIONAL LIFE STRATEGIES
		SAVOURING DAILY LIFE
		ATTENDING TO SELF-MENTORING
		PROBING INNER CONVERSATIONS
		BECOMING REFLECTIVE PRACTIONERS
		TRUSTING ONESELF
		RESPECT ONESELF
		THOUGHTFUL OPTIMISM
		MANAGING PERSONAL WELLNESS
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 5: LEADING OTHERS
		THE PERCEPTUAL CORE OF INTERACTION
		LIVING COMMUNICATION
		IMPORTANCE OF RELATIONSHIPS
		SUSTAINED ACTION
			Being Ready
			Doing With
		FOLLOWING THROUGH
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 6: ARTFULLY MANAGING CONFLICT, REALLY
		INTERPERSONAL TENSIONS
			Using the Six Cs
			Concern
			Confer
			Consult
			Confront
			Combat
			Conciliate
		MANAGING PHILOSOPHICAL DIFFERENCES
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 7: LEADING FOR VALUED KNOWLEDGE
		PROMOTING A POSITIVE AND REALISTIC SELF-CONCEPT-AS-LEARNER
			Relating
			Asserting
			Investing
			Coping
		LEADING MINDFUL LEARNING
		VALUED KNOWLEDGE
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 8: MANAGING EDUCATIONAL SENSIBILITIES
		CONSIDER CARING
		DIALOGUE ON INVITATIONAL LEARNING
		SUCCESSFUL INTELLIGENCE
		MAKING TOUGH CHOICES
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 9: LEADING EDUCATIONAL COMMUNITIES
		STRUCTURE, FREEDOM, AND COMPLEXITY
		EDUCATIONAL METAPHORS (FACTORY VS. FAMILY)
		SCHOOLS AS EFFICIENT FACTORIES
		SCHOOLS AS INVITING FAMILIES
		IMAGINING AN INVITING FAMILY SCHOOL
		THE ESSENTIAL FOCUS OF AN INVITING FAMILY SCHOOL
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 10: MANAGING A STARFISH
		STARFISH POWER
		INVITING MEANINGFUL CHANGE
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 11: LEADING WITHIN AND BEYOND SCHOOLS
		SAVOURING REALITY IN A COMPLEX WORLD
		UNDERSTANDING THE COMPLEXITY OF THE PRESENT
		BETTERING CONFLICTING POSSIBILITIES
		DEEPENING EDUCATIONAL DEMOCRACY
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
	CHAPTER 12: MANAGING SCHOOLS FOR A MORE INCLUSIVE WORLD
		MANAGING TO TAKE THE SCHOOL OUTSIDE
		WORKING WITH OTHER SCHOOLS
		WORKING FROM HOME
		INVITATIONAL GOVERNANCE
			Covenant
			Charter
			Critical Study Process
		INVITING COMMUNITY
		MENTORING CONVERSATIONS
PART 3: DARE TO LEAD FOR EDUCATION
	CHAPTER 13: HOPE FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
		GETTING TO THE EDUCATIONAL HEART OF LIVES
		SPEAKING UP FOR EDUCATION
			Logos
			Ethos
			Pathos
			Developing a Seventh Sense
APPENDIX A: STRAND REPORT FORM
APPENDIX B: INVITING SCHOOL SURVEY – REVISED (ISS-R)
	DIRECTIONS
REFERENCES
INDEX
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Leading For Educational Lives: Inviting and Sustaining
Imaginative Acts of Hope in a Connected World

Page 104

CHAPTER 6

94

optimism, it can be a way to manage difficult conflict situations in ways congru-
ent with the spirit of an inviting stance and make combative situations less vola-
tile. This ameliorative way of thinking can carry over to dealing with larger, more
philosophical differences.

MANAGING PHILOSOPHICAL DIFFERENCES

In a fast-paced, multicultural world, philosophical differences can occur with pre-
dicted regularity. Political candidates often avoid serious discussions by making glib
comments or by distracting by using humorous anecdotes. Although humour may
have its place, democratic conversation is corrupted when politicians are merely
trying to win voters and influence the media rather than deal honestly with serious
issues of mutual concern. Our philosophical beliefs go to the core of what we believe
we are and want to become. To ignore serious discussion of them is to become
encrusted in deep superficiality, moving deceptively on thin ice. On the other hand,
to engage in abstract ideological squabbles in ways that generate more heat than
light is to engender bottomless gridlock, and eventually a hostile silence. What’s an
invitational leader to do?

One way to avoid philosophical superficiality or disaster is to use an approach
to conflict developed by one of the authors on a ski lift with his daughter. He was
talking with his then 11 year-old daughter on a two-person ski lift (philosophical
issues sometimes require privacy) about John Dewey’s concepts of continuity and
interaction. He explained that if you take seriously these ideas you realize that
everything that has happened in the universe has led to this very moment and what
we do now will carry on in the future. Waiting for a response, he was surprised
by his usually articulate daughter’s silence. Then a few seconds later she replied,
“Perhaps” and was quiet again. A few seconds later, to his surprise, she added,
“Upon reflection, we could get sucked into a black hole so it won’t matter what
we are doing now.” Even more surprised, the author, in the spirit of the conversa-
tion said, “Perhaps, but it matters now and that should count for something.” That
conversation is still continuing.

This experience represented to the author the possibility of nurturing healthy
and productive philosophical discussions. Using the framework of that conversa-
tion, an approach to the spirit of inviting reflection was developed that intends to
do the following:

– Demonstrate sincere respect for an other’s perspective;
– Show that you have seriously considered his or her ideas;
– Allow you to state your concerns through honest questions;
– Call forth the possibility for a deeper conversation and a richer understanding.

With these intentions and the experience of a rich and provocative conversation, the
SPURT-Q approach was developed. Each of the letters stands for an important part
of the five-step process:

Page 105

ARTFULLY MANAGING CONFLICT, REALLY

95

1. S: Silence. To respond immediately to a deep philosophical concern of another
person can imply that you have not really heard what they meant or that your
response is rehearsed and does not require much thought on your part. Either
of these responses serves to negate the value and depth of the other person’s
thoughts.

2. P: Perhaps. Used honestly, this might be the most important word in a
philosophical conversation. When used honestly, “perhaps” means that you have
a sense that there is something positive to what the person is saying but you also
have your doubts.

3. UR: Upon Reflection. This phrase indicates that you wish to go below the
surface and take the conversation beyond ideological certainties, both yours and
the other person’s.

4. T: Tentative agreement. You articulate what part of the other person’s statement
you agree with or, upon restatement, could agree with. This provides a common
ground.

5. Q: Question. You put the ball back on the other person’s side of the court by
asking a question regarding what you have concerns about and what needs further
conversation. You are not merely playing the devil’s advocate but, because you
have used an honest “perhaps,” have a pressing question you would like addressed.

Let’s now put this to work. Imagine a colleague continually says to you, “These kids
today really have it a lot easier than we did, back in the day.” You feel that this state-
ment is often a code for criticizing an empathic approach to working with people
and can be used to justify a more punitive disciplinary style. Realizing that reacting
in a knee-jerk style will probably just entangle you in an endless battle, you decide
to try the SPURT-Q approach rather than ignoring or seething about the remark. The
conversation might go like this:

1. You remain silent for a few seconds to overcome your first unreflective tendency
and see if you can find any other ways to look at what is being said.

2. Finding some other ways to make sense of what has been said, you sincerely say
“Perhaps.”

3. Showing that you have given the statement some deeper thought, you add, “Upon
reflection.”

4. You now back up your reflective phase with the thought, “I can agree that students
have more conveniences to work with and more freedom to explore ways of being
in the world. In many ways I am upset too by what they may take for granted.”

5. You then raise your question and state, “Do you think, however, that they are
living at a time that is filled with dangers and obstacles we never had to consider?”

Done this way, there is the possibility that a more extended conversation about the
issues today’s students face and what is needed to know to be able to approach them
in an educationally meaningful way. Will this happen every time? Probably not. In
discussing heated issues with real people, many complexities may come forward

Page 208

INDEX

208

Snygg, D, 71
social interaction, 118, 119
social responsibility, 13, 187
society

leadership and, 4, 51, 66, 83, 88,
179, 207

management and, 54, 62, 101
vital connections to, 131, 132

spiral diagram, 46
SPURT-Q, 94–96, 162, 163, 186
stance, inviting, 69, 73–76, 82, 83, 86,

91, 92, 94, 114, 150, 184, 185, 189
Stanley, P.H., 60, 61
Starfi sh analogy

managing, 141
strategies, 71, 77, 85, 104, 116–118,

146, 149, 153, 162, 172, 178, 187
Sternberg, R, 119, 120
Strategies, 71, 77, 85, 104, 116–118,

146, 149, 153, 162, 172, 178, 187
stress

management, 65
structural leadership, 5
structure and freedom, 125–128, 137
sustainability

doing with, 19, 21, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74,
75, 77, 82, 90, 114, 187

following through, 75, 80, 87
symbolic leadership, 5
systemic application, 147

technology, 12, 13, 25, 129
thinking

all or none thinking, 60
as a virtue, 105, 115

tribalship/tribalism, 12, 13
Truett Anderson, W, 8
Trust, 18, 28, 40, 53, 63, 66, 69, 73, 77,

79, 82, 92, 100, 114, 135, 137,
144, 172, 178, 185

understanding, 11–13, 20, 21, 24,
34–36, 39, 42–44, 46–50, 53, 55,
66, 72, 80, 86, 87, 89, 90, 93, 94,
97–99, 102, 105–108, 110, 111,
114, 116–118, 127, 128, 136,
137, 141, 146–150, 156, 160,
164–166, 179, 187–189

underwhelming, 10, 57, 118
unintentionally disinviting, 26, 28, 185
unintentionally inviting, 26, 29, 185
uniqueness, 5, 13, 19, 42, 74, 79, 81,

117, 130, 131, 135, 137, 144
Ury, W., 156, 162, 163
values

core, 160, 175, 178
valued knowledge, 99–111, 114, 116,

144, 185
values and knowledge

leading for, 39, 69, 99, 125
managing, 53, 85, 113, 139, 169

vision, 3–6, 8, 11–15, 82, 125, 164,
178, 184

virtues, 105, 108, 109, 164

Wasicsko, M.M., 72
Whelming, 11, 118
Wong, P, 151, 171

Zhang, D, 143

Page 209

209

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

John M. Novak is Professor of Graduate Studies in the Faculty of Education at Brock
University, Ontario Canada. An invited speaker around the world, he has given
keynote addresses from north of the Arctic Circle to the bottom of New Zealand. A
former public school teacher and three-time chair of his department, he is also a past
president of the Society of Professors of Education and has written a dozen books
and monographs on invitational education, John Dewey, and educational leadership.

Denise E. Armstrong is an Associate Professor in Administration and Leadership
in the Faculty of Education at Brock University and has also worked in a variety
of K-12 institutions in Canada and the Caribbean as a professor, administrator, and
teacher. Her research and writing focus on ethical leadership and social justice. She
is the author of Administrative Passages: Navigating the Transition From Teacher to
Assistant Principal and co-author of Inclusion in Urban Educational Environments:
Addressing Issues of Diversity, Equity and Social Justice.

Brendan Browne is a Superintendent of Education with the Halton Catholic District
School Board. He has been a classroom, special education, and itinerant teacher
in both elementary and secondary schools, and a vice-principal and principal in
several diverse and distinct school communities. In addition, he has a Ph.D. in
Educational Leadership and has written and presented on Invitational Leadership
and Theory around the world. He is interested in the intersection of ideas and ideals
in contemporary schools.

Similer Documents