Download Irving Chernev – Capablancas Best Chess Ending PDF

TitleIrving Chernev – Capablancas Best Chess Ending
LanguageEnglish
File Size7.6 MB
Total Pages302
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Game 01 : Capablanca-Corzo, 09th Match, 1901
Game 02 : Capablanca-Corzo, 11th Match, 1901
Game 03 : Marshall-Capablanca, 05th Match, 1909
Game 04 : Marshall-Capablanca, 23rd Match, 1909
Game 05 : Capablanca-Kreymbourg, New York, 1910
Game 06 : Capablanca-Corzo/Blanco/Portela, Havana, 1910
Game 07 : Capablanca-Janowsky, San Sebastian, 1911
Game 08 : Leonhardt-Capablanca, San Sebastian, 1911
Game 09 : Carranza-Capablanca, Buenos Aires, 1911
Game 10 : Capablanca-Janowsky, New York, 1913
Game 11 : Kline-Capablanca, New York, 1913
Game 12 : Stapfer-Capablanca, New York, 1913
Game 13 : Capablanca-Kupchik, Havana, 1913
Game 14 : Capablanca-Beynon, New York, 1913
Game 15 : Duras-Capablanca, New York, 1913
Game 16: Capablanca-Teichmann, Berlin, 1913
Game 17: Capablanca-Salwe, Lodz, 1913
Game 18 : Nimzowitsch-Capablanca, Riga, 1913
Game 19 : Fahndrich/Kaufmann-Capablanca/Reti, Vienna, 1914
Game 20 : Capablanca-Villegas, Buenos Aires, 1914
Game 21 : Ed. Lasker-Capablanca, New York, 1915
Game 22 : Capablanca-White, New York, 1915
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 151

Ending 34

Ending 34
Position after 35 . . . Ob2-b3
Bogolyubov

Capablanca to move

A t first glance. Black seems to have
a bit of advantage for the endgame.
His Queen, Rook, and Knight are
placed aggressively, and enjoy more
mobility than do White's pieces,
which stand in defensive positions.
Black has a trump too in his passed
Pawn, which becomes more danger-
ous with every step forward i t takes.

In White's favour though, i s the
fact that the enemy Bishop is shut
out of the game, which is the
equivalent of putting White a piece
ahead.

Ergo, if White is a piece ahead,
he must seize the initiative in order
to reap the benefit of this extra
force.

White's Pawn formation may
not be a thing of beauty, but des-
pite this handicap, Capablanca, dis-
playing his own brand of endgame
magic, manages to come up with
two connected passed Pawns in the

Page 138

center.
Remarkable!

36 Nf3-d4!
A brilliant offer of a Pawn, which
Bogolyubov does not dare accept!

After 36 . . . Qb3xc4, the strong-
est line for White is not Capablanca's
recommendation 37 Re2-c2, as that
alfows Black to put up a fight by
37 . . . Qc4xd5 38 Nd4-e6
ReBxe6! 39 f5xe6 QdSxe6, wi th
three Pawns for the exchange, but
37 Nd4-e6 at once, after which
37 . . . Re8-b8 38 Ne6xc5 d6xc5
39 Re2-d2 Rb8-b3 40 Qe3-f2 prab-
ably wins for White.

Black's Queen-side look menacing! 7 In view of this, Capab anca must
set about the task of transforming
his Queen Pawn at all cost into a
passed Pawn.

38 Re319 Kg8-f7

39 Kg2-f3 Rb8-b2

Offers Black some unattractive
choices. If :

(a) 4 1 . . . Nc5xe6 42 d5xe6+,
with an easy win for White, as
Black's Bishop will be buried
alive,

(b} 4 1 . . . Nc5xe4 42 Kf3xe4
R b2xe2+ 43 Ke4-d4 Re2-d2+
44 Rc3-d3 Rd2-a2 45 c4-c5, and
White wins.

42 c4-~5!

White's Pawns begin t o burst their

Page 152

chains. What follows is a race be-
tween the passed Pawns.

42 ... d6xc5
43 Ne6xc5 Nb3-d2+

44 Kf3-f2

This is less complicated than
44 Kf3-e3, when this might occur:
44. . . a4-a3 45 d5-d6 (of course
not 45 Rc3xa3 Nd2-c4+, and the
Rook goes) 45 . . . a3-a2 (on
45 . . . Kf7-e8 46 Ne2-d4 follows
with the threat of 47 d6-d7+ and
48 Nd4-c6+) 46 Nc5-e6 (threatens
mate in two) 46 . . . Rb2-b7
47 Ne6-d8+ Kf7-f8 48 Nd8xb7
a2-a1 (Q) 49 Rc3-c8+ Kf8-f7
50 Rc8-c7+ Kf7-f8 51 d6-d7, and
White wins.

So Capablanca pursues the
course he envisioned earlier.

Meanwhile, this is how things
look after his actual move:

Position after 44 Kf3-f2

Ending 34

'With this move, White assures his
victory in the finish of a game
which has been extremely difficult'
(Capablanca).

Now the threat of 49 Nd4-c6+
followed by 50 d6-d7+ forces
Black's next move.

'At last the Bishop comes out,' says
Capablanca, 'but only as a stepping-
stone for White's Pawns.'

50 f5xs6
The ugly duckling of a Pawn forma-
tion, pictured earlier, has been trans-
formed into a beautiful swan.

50 ... R b6- b8
51 eSe7+ Kd8-e8

52 NcSxaG! Black Resigns

Bogoly ubov does not wait for the
denouement: 52 . . . a3-a2
53 Na6x b8 a2-a 1 (Q) 54 d6-d7+
Ke8xe7 55 d7-d8(QI+ Ke7-f7
56 Qd8-d5+ Kf7-f8 57 Qd5-c5+
Kf8-e8 58 Qc5-h5+ Keg-e7
59 Nb8-c6+ Ke7-f8 60 Rd3-d8
mate.

An ending marked by superb
position and combination play.

44 . . . Kf7-e7
Capablanca says that Black might
have tried 44 . . . Nd2-bl
45 Nc5xa4 Nblxc3 46 Na4xb2
Nc3xe4+ 47 Kf2-e3 Ne4-d6, with
good chances to draw.

Page 139

Page 301

I
i l

Bibliography

I: Endgame Manuals
'I Averbach, Yuri-Lehrbuch der

Endspiele (4 Vols. 1

Barden, Leonard-How to Play the
Endgame in Chess

1 ' Cheron, Andr4-Lehr-und Handbuch
1 1 der Endwiele (3 Vols.)

Euwe, Max and Hooper, David-A
Guide to Chess Endings

i F ine, Reu ben-Basic Chess Endings
Gawlikowski, Stanislaw-Koncowa
Gra fachowa

!

Hooper, David-How to Play Chess
Endgames

Levenfisch, Grigori and Smyslov,
Vasil y -Rook Endings

Rabinovich, I. t.-Toren Eindspelen
-Pard en Loper Eindspelen
Radulescu, Mihai-Finulari Corn
piexe in Sah

Znosko-Borovsky, Eugene-How to
Play Chess Endings

Magazines

American Chess Bulletin 1 909-
1942
Chess Review 1933- 1942
Ld&chiquier 1925-1937
Les Cahiea de L'kchiqujer Fran~ais
1925- 1936
Wiener Schachzeitung 1 909- 1 9 1 5,
1924- 1933

Page 288

Page 302

Irving Chernev 1 I

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