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TitleIntroduction to Swedish
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Table of Contents
                            Introduction to SwedishÓ
	By Urban Sikeborg, Stockholm 1997–98
SWEDISH
	EVERY
	NOTE
		A guide to pronunciation
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 33

(like y in yes)

dj djur [animal; related to English ‘dear’ and German ‘Tier’]

g (before the soft vowels e, i, y, ä, ö) gäst [guest; German ‘Gast’]

gj gjórde [did, made]

hj hjä´lpa [(to) help; German ‘helfen’]

j ja [yes]

lj ljus [light, candle; German ‘licht’]

The tj sound
(like ch in check but without the initial t sound)

ch check

k (before the soft vowels e, i, y, ä, ö) kílo [kilo]

kj kjol [skirt]

tj tjúgo [twenty]

The sj sound
As sh in shoe but formed further back in the mouth. It is often also pronounced like a softer version
of German ch in ach, or in the Scottish name Loch Lomond. It can be spelled:

ch chock [shock]

-ge garáge (mostly French loan-words)
Note: Can only be pronounced like sh in shoe.

rs mars [March]
Note: Can only be pronounced like sh in shoe.

sch schámpo [shampoo]

sh sherry (only in loan-words)

sj sju [seven]

sk (before the soft vowels e, i, y, ä, ö): skinn! [skin]. Before a consonant or a hard vowel (a, o, u, å) ‘sk’ is
pronounced as two separate letters. (One important exception is ‘mä´nniska’ [human being], where ‘sk’ is
pronounced as a sj sound, in spite of the following hard vowel; the word was originally spelled with an ‘i’
directly after ‘sk’.) Before a consonant ‘sk’ is pronounced as two separate letters.

skj skjórta [shirt]

stj stjä´rna [star]

The ng sound
(as ng in singer – not like in finger!)

ng må´nga [many]

g (before an n) regn [rain]

n bank

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