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TitleIntegrated Lifecycle Services for Persons with Disabilities: A Theoretical and Empirical Perspective
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size10.1 MB
Total Pages395
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Disorders of Human Learning,
Behavior, and Communication
Ronald L. Taylor and Les Sternberg
Series Editors

Page 2

Kathryn A. Haring David L. Lovett
Norris G. Haring
Editors

Integrated Lifecycle
Services for Persons
with Disabilities
A Theoretical and Empirical Perspective

Springer-Verlag
New York Berlin Heidelberg London Paris
Tokyo Hong Kong Barcelona Budapest

Page 197

6. Curricular Concerns in Educating Students With Disabilities 185

Lakeview School District Academic Progress Record

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Name Nichole Jackson Birthdate 25-12-72

FIGURE 6.1. Illustration of longitudinal record of academic progress based on
individualized education plan (IEP) of a student with profound intellectual
disabilities and dual sensory impairments (adapted from Haring & Liberty, 1990).

There are some patterns that can be recognized and used to revise the
program. First, if all students are passing almost all objectives, the pro-
gram should be evaluated to determine whether students are being suf-
ficiently challenged by the quality and quantity of the objectives set for or
with ,them, and to determine whether expectations should be raised. One
might also consider exporting the instructional and curricular strategies to
weaker programs serving similar types of students. If on the other hand,
almost all students are passing less than half of their objectives, the
program should be evaluated to determine if objectives are individ-
ualized, if they are appropriate, and whether the most powerful teaching
strategies are in use. Or if most students are passing less than 10% of

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Page 198

186 K. Liberty

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Hillcrest School District Program Evaluation

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77 78 79 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85

Program Severe Handicaps

FIGURE 6.2. Example of actual longitudinal record of program success in
instruction of learners with disabilities to meet individual goals and objectives
(adapted from Hilton & Liberty, 1986).

their objectives, serious problems in the program should be identified and
corrected as soon as possible.

Together, application of these strategies will improve the quality of
each child's education by ensuring that curricula are truly individualized.
In the short run, implementing such strategies may be time-consuming
and difficult; in the long run, such techniques are the only conceivable
route to graduating students with disabilities with the skills they need to
be employed and accepted in their communities.

Page 394

382 Index

Social interactions (cant.)
adult- and peer-mediated instruction

strategies in, 95-96
direct instruction, 90-96
improving, 94
methods to affect, 90-103
summary of methods to affect, 102-

103
Social Interaction Assessment and

Intervention program, 214
Social learning, 255
Social-learning techniques, 44
Social perception deficits, 33
Social perceptions and environment,

64-65
Social performance deficits, 41
Social problem-solving (SPS) skills,

45-46
in young children, 39

Social sensitivity, 33
Social skill deficits, 41

four types of, 41-42
Social skills

five subscales of, 43
instruction in, 95
social competence distinguished

from, 28-29
Social Skills Rating Systems, 43
Social skills training, 43
Social validity, measures of, 109-110
Sociometric approach, 29
Special education, 1-2

basic concept of, 1-2
curricula, 11-12
definition of, 1,2
development of, 361-362
drop outs, 7
effectiveness of, 8
expectations of, 8
friendships and social networks and,

63-64
history of, 80
measuring outcomes of, 7
personnel in, 10, 14
programs created according to

handicapping conditions, 3-4
research and evaluation, 6-8
role of special educators, 9-10
separate locations for, 3-4

Special educators
regular educators and, 13
role of, 9-10
at secondary level, 14

Special services
assumptions and premises

underlying, 3
major purpose of, 4
as term, 2

Stereotypes, 37
Stereotypic behavior, 76
Stimulus-response-consequence

(S-R-C), 111
Strategies

of children, 39-40
teaching, 37

Student-initiation strategies, 93-94
Students with disabilities

attending school with nondisabled
peers, 4

with behavior disorders, 3
individualized education for, 4
in segregated schools, 4-5
segregated services for, 6
variables affecting placement of, 5

Student/teacher ratings, 110
Systems change, 15-17, 304-305

including community in, 17
questions to address in plan for, 16

17
strategy for, 16
technical assistance in, 16

System paradigm, 14-17
analysis of service delivery, 14-15
new emerging paradigm, 15-16
systems change, 15-17

Supported education
administrative issues and goals of,

113-114
behavior analysis in, 88-115
definition of, 89

Supported employment model, 294-
295

T
Task analysis, 74-75

contextualistic approach to, 75
limited scope of, 62

Page 395

modification to, 62-63
problems with, 62
purpose of, 64

Teacher-mediated instruction, 105-106
Teachers, role of, 13
Test of Social Inference, 34
Top-down, as term, 162
Top-down approach, 181-182
Transactional Family Systems Model

(TFSM),213
Transactional Model of Early Home

Intervention, 214
Transdisciplinary model, 230
Truth criterion, in mechanism, 79-80
Turtle Technique, 45

U
"Ultimate environments," 163
Uniform Performance Assessment

System (UPAS), 72
U.S. Department of Education, Office

of Special Education and
Rehabilitative Services, 21

U.S. Public Law 94-142 (Education
for All Handicapped Children Act
of 1975), 10,20-21, 162, 163, 179,

Index 383

222,228
U.S. Public Law 98-199, Section 626,

270
U.S. Public Law 99-457,71,81,222,

228,229
Part B of, 222
Part H of, 225

U.S. Supreme Court, 20

V
Vermont Best Practices Guidelines,

232
Vocational adjustment, 261
Vocational assessment, 261-262
Vocational education programs, 262-

263
Vocational evaluation, 261-262
Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1918,

269
Vocational training, 265, 266

W
War on Poverty program, 139
World views, 59-60

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