Download Improving lives: the work, health and disability green paper PDF

TitleImproving lives: the work, health and disability green paper
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.1 MB
Total Pages95
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Ministerial foreword
Executive summary
1: Tackling a significant inequality – the case for action
2: Supporting people into work
3: Assessments for benefits for people with health conditions
4: Supporting employers to recruit with confidence and create healthy workplaces
5: Supporting employment through health and high quality care for all
6: Building a movement for change: taking action together
Appendix: Summary of consultation questions
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Improving Lives
The Work, Health and Disability
Green Paper

Presented to Parliament
by the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and the Secretary of State
for Health
by Command of Her Majesty
October 2016

Cm 9342

Page 2

Improving Lives
The Work, Health and Disability
Green Paper






















Presented to Parliament
by the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and the Secretary of State for Health
by Command of Her Majesty

October 2016

Cm 9342

Page 47

44 Improving Lives The Work, Health and Disability Green Paper



Your views

138. We recognise that stakeholders have repeatedly highlighted concerns about the effectiveness of the
Work Capability Assessment. We want to hear your views on alternative ways that we could
improve the process by which people are assessed for entitlement to financial support.

 Should the assessment for the financial support an individual receives from the system be
separate from the discussion a claimant has about employment or health support?

 How can we ensure that each claimant is matched to a personalised and tailored employment-
related support offer?

 What other alternatives could we explore to improve the system for assessing financial support?

Improving the data we use to assess financial support

139. People rightly expect public services to work together with each other, and to use the information
they have provided to ensure the best possible service. This is even more important for services
that provide essential financial support when someone is in need, such as when they have
developed a health condition, or lost their job and their source of income.

140. For example, the Armed Forces Covenant helps ensure that service personnel, veterans and their
families are supported and treated fairly, and recognises that special consideration is appropriate in
some cases, especially for those who have given the most, such as those who have been injured.
The Department for Work and Pensions uses Service Medical Board evidence where it can so a
severely disabled person doesn’t have to undergo additional examinations for Employment and
Support Allowance purposes.

141. However, there may be opportunities to use this evidence more widely in Employment and Support
Allowance and Universal Credit assessments for all members of the armed forces which would
result in speedier benefit awards and a less burdensome claiming process for the individuals.

142. If a person falls out of work as a result of a health condition or disability, they might already be
accessing NHS services and potentially support from their local authority such as adult social care.
They might also apply for financial assistance from a range of NHS schemes, such as the
Healthcare Travel Costs Scheme. In addition, they might also claim a number of benefits, including
Employment and Support Allowance or Universal Credit, and Disability Living Allowance or Personal
Independence Payment.

143. In order to receive both Employment and Support Allowance or Universal Credit, and Personal
Independence Payment, people will take part in 2 separate assessment processes. Around half of
those who claim Employment and Support Allowance also receive Personal Independence Payment
(or Disability Living Allowance), and 64% of those in the Employment and Support Allowance
Support Group claim Personal Independence Payment or Disability Living Allowance.86 This means
that these individuals have to make 2 separate benefit applications where they often have to provide
much of the same information, which might be in addition to applying to the NHS, local services or
other bodies to receive specific support. For those who claim both Employment and Support
Allowance and Personal Independence Payment, as at April 2016, around 70% applied for
Employment and Support Allowance first.87


86 Department for Work and Pensions and Department of Health. Work, Health and Disability Green Paper Data Pack; 2016.
87 Department for Work and Pensions and Department of Health. Work, Health and Disability Green Paper Data Pack; 2016.

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Improving Lives The Work, Health and Disability Green Paper 45



144. Different schemes provide financial support to meet different needs. For instance, Employment and
Support Allowance and Universal Credit are paid to replace and supplement someone s income
while they are out of work or in low-paid work with a health condition. However Personal
Independence Payment is designed to contribute to additional costs arising from a disability. It is
sometimes appropriate that individuals might receive one and not the other, so to some extent it
may be unavoidable that more than one application and assessment is required to determine
eligibility for these different schemes.

145. However, where there are opportunities to share common information across processes and where
information is up to date and relevant, we should reduce the burden on the individual of providing
the same details over and over again should they claim both. This could also improve the accuracy
of assessments to ensure individuals get the financial support they are entitled to, by making more
effective use of data already held within the welfare system.

146. For example, subject to establishing that any data to be shared is up to date and relevant, we can
consider sharing of data between the two assessments for Employment Support
Allowance/Universal Credit and Personal Independence Payment. This could mean sending
relevant sections of the Work Capability Assessment report to Personal Independence Payment
assessors should an individual in receipt of Employment Support Allowance/Universal Credit,
subsequently claim Personal Independence Payment. This could simplify the process so that once
someone has provided information about their health condition to one part of the system, that
information is used if they make a claim to a different benefit. This would ensure a person receives
what they are entitled to without having to submit the same information again.

147. We will also explore how the assessment process could use data already gathered by the NHS or
local authorities where appropriate, to ensure people do not have to repeatedly provide the same
information. There are inevitably important sensitivities around how an individual s data is used,
and Dame Fiona Caldicott Review of data security and consent / opt-outs has explored how we
achieve the right balance between protecting an individual s data, and using it to improve services.88
However, if we can strike the right balance, there is a valuable opportunity to create a more
seamless journey for people with the most needs, using data in a way that improves their access
to services, and promotes more integrated services.

Those with the most severe lifelong conditions

148. Some people have been diagnosed with the most severe health conditions and disabilities from
which they will never recover, and which require high levels of day-to-day care. People in these
circumstances are likely to already have significant engagement with the NHS or social care
services and in many cases they will already have had detailed and up-to-date NHS or local
authority health or care assessments.

149. As these people s conditions are extremely unlikely to improve, we have recently announced that
they will no longer be required to take part in reassessments and are engaging with experts to
design the criteria for deciding to whom this should apply. They are still currently expected to take
part in an initial Work Capability Assessment to determine if they should have access to increased
financial support and to decide their access to employment support.

150. We are therefore consulting on whether we should introduce a more appropriate process for
people who have severe health conditions and disabilities, who represent a small proportion of
those in the Employment and Support Allowance caseload. For instance, we could consider whether
a simpler assessment process could be developed, that means that people do not need to provide
as much information as required under the current system. It may be possible to achieve this, with
an individual s consent, by using data already held in the NHS to determine severity of condition and
functional impact where this is appropriate.


88 National Data Guardian. Review of Data Security, Consent and Opt-Outs; 2016.

Page 94

Improving Lives The Work, Health and Disability Green Paper 91



Transforming the landscape of work and health support

 How can occupational health and related provision be organised so that it is accessible and tailored
for all? Is this best delivered at work, through private provision, through the health system, or a
combination?

 What has been your experience of the Fit for Work service, and how should this inform integrated
provision for the future?

 What kind of service design would deliver a position in which everyone who needs occupational
health assessment and advice is referred as matter of course?

Creating the right environment to join up work and health

 How can we best encourage innovation through local networks, including promoting models of joint
working such as co-location, to improve health and work outcomes?

 How can we encourage the recording of occupational status in all clinical settings and good use of
these data?

 What should we include in a basket of health and work indicators covering both labour market and
health outcomes at local level?

 How can government and local partners best encourage improved sharing of health and employment
data?

 What is the best way to bring together and share existing evidence in one place for commissioners
and delivery partners?

 What is the best way to encourage clinicians, allied health professionals and commissioners of
health and other services to promote work as a health outcome?

Chapter 6: Building a movement for change: taking action
together

 How can we bring about a shift in society’s wider attitudes to make progress and achieve long-lasting
change?

 What is the role of government in bringing about positive change to our attitudes to disabled people
and people with health conditions?

 Could any of the proposals within the green paper potentially have an adverse effect on people with
a protected characteristic? If so, which proposal, and which protected group/s are affected? And how
might the group/s be affected?

Page 95

This publication can be accessed online at:
https://consultations.dh.gov.uk/workandhealth/consult/

For more information about this publication, contact:
[email protected] or write to us at The
Work, Health and Disability consultation, Ground Floor,
Caxton House, 6–12 Tothill Street, London, SW1H 9NA

Copies of this publication can be made available in
alternative formats if required.



Department for Work and Pensions and
Department of Health

October 2016

www.gov.uk

https://consultations.dh.gov.uk/workandhealth/consult/
mailto:[email protected]
http://www.gov.uk/

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