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Page 1

HVS Global Hospitality Services |
Indonesia Stock Exchange Building, Tower II, 17

th
Floor

Jl. Jenderal Sudirman Kav 52-53, Jakarta 12190, Indonesia



www.hvs.com



INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH

INDONESIA OVERVIEW

JULY 2013

David Ling
Chairman
HVS China & Southeast Asia

Andree Susilo
Investment Associate
HVS Singapore/Jakarta

Zhihui Yeo
Consulting & Valuation Associate
HVS Singapore

Page 2

INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH – INDONESIA OVERVIEW | PAGE 2


FIGURE 1: GDP DISTRIBUTION BY PROVINCE, INDONESIA

Province 2010 2011

Jakarta 16.28 % 16.32 %

East Java 14.71 14.68

West Java 14.58 14.30

Central Java 8.40 8.28

Riau 6.53 6.87

East Kalimantan 6.08 6.49

North Sumatra 5.21 5.22

Banten 3.24 3.19

South Sumatra 2.98 3.02

South Sulawesi 2.23 2.28

Remaining Provinces 19.76 19.35

Total 100.00 100.00

Source: Badan Pusat Statistik Indonesia



Unprecedented Growth in Asia’s Rising Powerhouse

Rich in natural resources and experiencing an era of dynamic economic progress, Indonesia is a market not to be

missed. Tourism arrival is expected to increase from the current 250 million in 2012 to an estimated 400 million by

2023 based on a 5% compound annual growth rate. An additional 100,000 guestrooms will be required,

translating to an estimated 700 to 800 hotels to be built in the next decade, creating tremendous opportunities for

developers, investors, financiers, hotel management groups, airlines companies, travel agencies, consultancies and

other stakeholders.

The concentration of Indonesia's international tourist arrivals still revolves between the nation's capital city

Jakarta and the world-renowned destination of Bali. However, there is growing interest in Indonesia's second and

third tier markets, with many market players taking note of their massive potential. Stakeholders such as hotel

operators, investors, developers and the government sectors are closely following the new investments 'hot spots'

of Indonesia.

Economy to mid-scale hotel properties are the key target segments for many stakeholders' growth expansion

plans in the coming years. Hotel chains such as Accor, InterContinental Hotels Group, as well as Indonesia's

domestic hotel groups such as Archipelago International and Tauzia have indicated their intentions of

strengthening the presence of their economy to mid-scale brands in such emerging markets.

Overall, Indonesia’s tourism industry, can expect strong long-term potential, bolstered by rising demand for

domestic and regional travel, resulting in a diversification of destinations and hotel product offerings.

Economic Updates

In January 2013, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), forecasted global economic growth at 3.2%, with some major

economies of Asia registering a drop in GDP growth. A combination of five ASEAN countries- Indonesia, Malaysia,

Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam registered 5.7% growth in 2012. Despite the global uncertainty, Indonesia was able

to register a strong growth of 6.3% in 2012, brought

about by robust domestic and regional demand and

investments. Economic activity and foreign direct

investments have increased tremendously throughout

Indonesia, due to the tremendous economic potential

that the vast country holds- on the back of strong GDP

compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.9% from

2008 to 2012.

Indonesia’s GDP is predominantly generated in Java

which accounts for more than 50% of the country’s GDP.

The capital city, Jakarta accounted for the largest

distribution of the country’s GDP at 16.32% in 2011,

followed by East Java at 14.68%

.

Page 3

INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH – INDONESIA OVERVIEW | PAGE 3


Indonesia at a Glance

International Arrivals (2005 – 2012)

-10%

-5%

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

G
ro

w
th

A
rr

iv
a

ls
(

M
il

li
o

n
s)

International
Arrivals

% Change International Arrivals

Source: Badan Pusat Statistik Indonesia









Top 5 Feeder Markets - Country of Origin, 2011

Singapore
20%

Malaysia
17%

Australia
12%

China
8%

Japan
5%

Others
38%

Source: Badan Pusat Statistik Indonesia



Tourism Receipts – (2006 – 2012)

-20%

-10%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

0

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

6,000

7,000

8,000

9,000

10,000

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

P
e

rc
e

n
ta

g
e

C
h

a
n

g
e

(
%

)

T
o

u
ri

sm
R

e
ce

ip
ts

(
B

il
li

o
n

U
S

D
)

Tourism Receipts (Billion USD) % Growth

Source: Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy









Seasonality of Arrivals (2008 – 2012)

300,000

350,000

400,000

450,000

500,000

550,000

600,000

650,000

700,000

750,000

800,000

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Source: Badan Pusat Statistik Indonesia

 International arrivals have grown on average by
7.0% between 2005 and 2012.

 Consistent growth from 2005 to 2012 due to strong
branding of Indonesia as a tourist destination.

 Tourism receipts reached USD9,121 billion in 2012, a
7% growth over 2011.

 Tourism receipts grew by a compound average rate of
13% between 2006 and 2012, and strong growth is
expected to continue.

 International arrivals are relatively stable
throughout the different months of the year.

 High season demand occurs during the Christmas
period and the summer months.

 The Ramadan month tends to be the low season
period.

 The main driver behind overall demand growth was
constituted by the Asia market (80% of total arrivals
in 2011).

 Singapore is the largest arrival source market to
Indonesia (20%).

Page 4

INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH – INDONESIA OVERVIEW | PAGE 4

FIGURE 2: INTERNATIONAL VISITOR ARRIVALS- TOP 10 PORT OF ENTRIES WITH HIGHEST VOLUME IN 2012

Port of Entry 2011 2012 YOY % Change

Ngurah Rai 2,788,706 2,902,125 4.1%

Soekarno-Hatta 1,933,022 2,053,850 6.3%

Batam 1,161,581 1,219,608 5.0%

Tanjung Uban 337,353 336,547 -0.2%

Polonia 192,650 205,845 6.8%

Juanda 185,815 197,776 6.4%

Husein Sastranegara 115,285 146,736 27.3%

Tanjung Balai Karimun 104,397 107,499 3.0%

Tanjung Pinang 106,180 103,785 -2.3%

Tanjung Priok 65,171 66,168 1.5%

Indonesia Total 7,649,731 8,044,462 5.2%

Source: Badan Pusat Statistik Indonesia



Tourism Market Performance and Trends

Tourism concluded strongly for Indonesia in 2012 as international visitor arrivals surpassed the target

set for the year of eight million, achieving a record breaking 8.04 million international arrivals last year;

this translates to a 5.16% increase over from 2011. Of this, Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport saw

2.9 million international tourist arrivals and Jakarta’s Soekarno-Hatta International Airport registered

2.0 million international tourist arrivals.

Thus, the concentration of Indonesia’s international tourist arrivals still revolve between the nation’s

capital city Jakarta and the world-renowned beach destination Bali. Port of entry Bandung Husein

Sastranegara registered the highest year-on-year growth in 2012, followed by Yogyakarta Adisucipto and

Balikpapan Sepinggan, achieving 27.3%, 22.4%, 7.8% growth respectively.

Domestic tourist arrivals saw 245 million trips made in 2012, an increase of 3.48% from 2011.

















The year 2013 is set to be an even better year for Indonesia’s tourism with the Ministry of Tourism and

Creative Economy targeting nine million international visitors; a 12% increase from 2012. Furthermore,

255 million of domestic trips are expected in 2013, an increase of 4.08% from 2012. Indonesia will be

under the spotlight this year with the hosting of a string of prolific international events such as the APEC

summit, WTO Ministerial Meeting and the Miss World Pageant.

Since 2005, Indonesia’s international arrivals have seen consistent year-on-year growth of at least 5%

except for 2009. From five million international arrivals in 2005, to now 8.04 million in 2012, this

translates to a CAGR of 7.0%. In 2009, the tourist arrival figures of most cities were affected negatively by

the global economic downturn. However, the Indonesia tourism market remained resilient and registered

an increase of 1% from 2008. The global economic crisis in 2008 and 2009 saw less people travelling long

distance, resulting in the country focusing its tourism efforts on short and medium-haul markets.

Indonesia will continue to focus its expansion of tourists from these source markets until the year 2015.

The top source markets for Indonesia have remained consistent over the years, with ASEAN accounting

for the majority of visitor arrivals. In 2011, visitor arrivals from the Middle East grew by the largest

percentage at 19% from 144,661 arrivals in 2010 to 175,885 in 2011. This large increment can be

attributed to the growing popularity of Indonesia, especially in areas such as West Java, to Middle Eastern

visitors.

Page 5

INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH – INDONESIA OVERVIEW | PAGE 5

FIGURE 3: ANNUAL GROWTH- ESTABLISHMENTS AND ROOMS, INDONESIA, 2008-12

CAGR Establishments 2008-2012 8.6%

CAGR Rooms 2008-2012 8.6%

Source: Badan Pusat Statistik Indonesia

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Establishment Room





FIGURE 4: TOP FIVE PROVINCES WITH HIGHEST NUMBER OF CLASSIFIED ESTABLISHMENTS AND ROOMS IN 2012





Arrivals from ASEAN countries grew by 8% from 2010, accounting for approximately 43% of arrivals in

2011, while arrivals from the rest of Asia grew by 13%, to account for approximately 37% of total arrivals

in 2011. China has quickly become one of the largest feeder markets for Indonesia, growing at a

compound annual growth rate of 36% between 2002 and 2011, and accounted for approximately 8% of

total international arrivals into Indonesia making it the fourth largest source market, followed by Japan at

5%.

Indonesia Hotel Market Supply

From 2008 to 2012, Indonesia’s classified establishments and subsequent rooms’ supply have been

consistently growing between 5% to 14%, which translates to a CAGR of 8.6% for both the number of

establishments and the number of rooms. The opening of new hotel developments surged in 2011, when

both establishments and rooms grew at approximately 14% each, compared to the year before.



















DKI Jakarta, West Java, Central Java, East Java and Bali are the top five provinces with the highest number

of classified establishments and rooms in Indonesia in 2012. Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia presents

with the highest at 172 rooms per establishment, while Indonesia registers 96 rooms per establishment.

Page 6

INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH – INDONESIA OVERVIEW | PAGE 6

FIGURE 5: TRAVEL AND TOURISM CONTRIBUTION, INDONESIA, 2002-2013F

Year

Travel & Tourism Contribution

(in Billion Rupiah) % of GDP

2002 208,881 11.4

2003 213,582 10.6

2004 240,217 10.4

2005 287,572 10.3

2006 322,953 9.6

2007 385,990 9.7

2008 491,608 9.9

2009 561,240 10

2010 588,845 9.1

2011 659,246 8.8

2012 736,259 8.9

2013F 835,268 9.0

CAGR

2002-12 13.4%

Source: World Travel & Tourism Council



FIGURE 6: TOURISM INVESTMENTS, INDONESIA, 2006-2012





Indonesia’s Tourism Economy

According to the World Travel and

Tourism Council, the total

contribution of travel and tourism to

Indonesia’s GDP was IDR736,259

billion or 8.9% of GDP in 2012. The

total contribution of travel and

tourism encompasses revenue

generated from hotels, airlines,

airports, travel agents and various

services that deal directly with

tourists, investments made in the

tourism industry such as the

construction of new hotels,

government initiatives such as

tourism marketing and supply chain

of the travel and tourism industry.

Between 2002 and 2012, the total contribution of travel and tourism grew at a compound average annual

growth rate of 13.4%. This strong growth can be attributed to increased marketing promotion by the

Ministry of Tourism, higher discretionary spending by a strongly growing middle-class in the region and

in the county, as well as a rapidly growing route network by international and domestic flight carriers. By

2013, this contribution is forecasted to rise by 8.3% to IDR835,268 billion and tourism employment will

be anticipated to comprise 8.0% of total employment in Indonesia.

Tourism Investment

Tourism investment in Indonesia grew by more than 210% from 2011 to 2012. The growth in tourism

investment in aligned with the country’s positive economic growth. Additionally, the Indonesian

government has been instrumental in streamlining investment procedures and promoting investment

opportunities and potential of Indonesia within the region, resulting in a favourable investment

environment.

Page 7

INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH – INDONESIA OVERVIEW | PAGE 7





Foreign direct tourism investments grew by 225% between 2011 and 2012, or at an annual compound

average growth rate of 38% between 2006 and 2012. Indonesia’s tourism investments are mainly focused

on the development of fully-integrated resort sites, as such properties help to boost the construction of

tourist facilities such as hotels and the development of the surrounding environment through social and

cultural aspects. Mid-tier resort and city hotel investments are at the moment still predominantly

domestically driven, however, that is changing rapidly in the short term.

Transportation Infrastructure

In line with Indonesia’s IDR4,000 trillion Accelerated and Expansion of Indonesia’s Economic

Development Plan (MP3EI), the country’s transport infrastructure will undergo several improvements

and additions to boost the country’s infrastructure and connectivity. Part of these improvements include

improving inter-island connectivity and to upgrade the country’s railways, roads, airports and seaports.

This new round of developments will be focused on less-densely populated areas, particularly eastern

Indonesia, as opposed to more densely populated areas such as Jakarta and Bali.

Air Transportation

Indonesia boasts good international accessibility, with the major ports of entry being the Soekarno-Hatta

International Airport in Jakarta and the Ngurah Rai International Airport in Bali. The country has more

than 300 airports, most of which are operated the state-owned PT Angkasa Pura I and PT Angkasa Pura II.

As part of the government’s MP3EI initiative, a total of 24 new airports will be opened by 2015. In 2013,

12 new airports spread across the archipelago will begin operations, with the majority of the new

projects to be located in eastern Indonesia. North Sumatra will see the opening of the Kuala Namu

International Airport, which will replace the Polonia International Airport in Medan, while Indonesia’s

prime diving destination Raja Ampat in Papua will benefit from the opening of the Waisai Airport. Other

new but smaller airports slated to open in 2013 include Muara Bungo Airport in Jambi, Saumlaki Baru in

Maluku, the Pekon Serai Krui Airport in Lampung, Bawean Airport on Bawean island near East Java

amongst others.

Several existing airports will be upgraded later this year, including the expansion of the Soekarno-Hatta

International Airport in Jakarta and the construction of a new terminal at Ngurah Rai International

Airport in Bali which will be able to handle 25 million passengers per annum upon completion in June.

Other airport upgrades will include the expansion of the Juanda International Airport in Surabaya and the

Komodo Airport in Flores on East Nusa Tenggara.

Cruise Tourism

Cruise sector in Indonesia is becoming one of the major contributions to the development of tourism

economy and infrastructure in Indonesia. As the world’s largest archipelago, this attributes to the many

wonders of gateways that Indonesia is able to leverage through its cruise industry. With over 17,000

islands forming the nation, cruises are able to access the many remote exotic islands throughout the

archipelago when it is currently still restricted by land or air transport.

Cruise calls and passengers figures have significantly firmed up over the past years in Indonesia, and are

still targeted to soar even higher in the coming years. A total of 306 cruise calls have been confirmed for

Page 8

INDONESIA HOTEL WATCH – INDONESIA OVERVIEW | PAGE 8

FIGURE 7: CRUISE CALLS, INDONESIA, 2009-2013F

Year Cruise Calls Passengers

2009 135 68,566

2010 189 94,166

2011 176 112,412

2012 214 113,781

2013 Forecast 306 145,936

CAGR 2009-2013(F) Calls Forecast 23%

CAGR 2009-2013(F) Passengers Forecast 21%

Source: Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy



FIGURE 8: 16 TOURISM DESTINATIONS, INDONESIA





2013, an astonishing 43% increase

from 2012; bringing about the highest

record of 146,000 passengers, a 28%

increase from 2012. The Ministry of

Tourism and Creative Economy has

committed to 320 calls in 2014, and

thus targeting 500,000 passengers by

2015.

Cruise ships will be covering some 115

locations this year in Indonesia

including new destinations like Sabang

in Aceh, Belawan in North Sumatra;

compared to covering only 70 locations

in 2012. West and East Nusa Tenggara

are the most popular destinations, followed by Bali and Java; with 75, 45 and 38 cruise calls respectively.

The nation is currently developing 15 harbours as cruise ports in locations such as in Aceh (Sabang);

Ambon; Bali (Benoa, Celukan); Belawan; Jakarta; Karimunjawa; Komodo Island; Kumai; Lombok

(Lembar); Makassar; Semarang and Surabaya. The cruise port in Benoa Bali is undergoing development

to be a turn-around port which can accommodate international cruise to the Island.

Government Initiatives

Indonesia’s Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy has spearheaded a new initiative to focus on 16

key tourism markets and seven segments of special interest within the country until 2014.

These destinations will be developed to help maximize the growth of tourism and to improve the quantity

and quality of international tourists coming to Indonesia. These destinations will be highlighted at

various travel tradeshows and sales missions, while familiarisation trips for travel consultants and media

will be organised. Additionally, the Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy will increase marketing

efforts pertaining to these areas through traditional and social media channels.







.

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