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TitleHealthy weight, healthy lives - UK Faculty of Public Health
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.7 MB
Total Pages257
Table of Contents
                            A Overweight and obesity: the public health problem
B Tackling overweight and obesity
C Developing a local overweight and obesity strategy
D Resources for commissioners
E Resources for healthcare professionals
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

HEALTHY WEIGHT, HEALTHY LIVES:
A TOOLKIT FOR DEVELOPING
LOCAL STRATEGIES

Page 2

DH
InformatIon
reaDer
BoX


Policy

HR/Workforce
Management
Planning
Clinical

Estates
Commissioning
IM & T
Finance
Social Care/Partnership Working

Document
purpose
Best Practice Guidance

Gateway
reference
10224

title
Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives:
A toolkit for developing local
strategies

author
Dr Kerry Swanton for the
National Heart Forum/Cross-
Government Obesity Unit/Faculty
of Public Health

Publication
date
October 2008

target
audience
PCT CEs, Directors of PH, Directors
of Nursing, Local Authority CEs,
Directors of Children’s SSs

Circulation
list
SHA CEs

Description
This toolkit is intended as a
resource to help those working
at a local level to plan and
coordinate comprehensive
strategies to prevent and manage
overweight and obesity.

Cross
reference
Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives:
A cross government strategy for
England; Healthy Weight, Healthy
Lives: Guidance for local areas

Superseded
documents
Lightening the Load: Tackling
overweight and obesity

action
required
N/A

timing
N/A

Contact
details
National Heart Forum
Tavistock House South
Tavistock Square
London WC1H 9LG
www.heartforum.org.uk

Cross-Government Obesity Unit
Wellington House
133-155 Waterloo Road
London SE1 8UG
www.dh.gov.uk

Faculty of Public Health
4 St Andrews Place
London NW1 4LB
www.fph.org.uk

for
recipient
use


http://www.heartforum.org.uk
http://www.dh.gov.uk
http://www.fph.org.uk

Page 128

Evidence tables
Children: healthy growth and healthy weight

Desired
behaviour

Interventions Evidence base Intervention
already in
place

Select
intervention

Effectiveness Evidence Cost-
effectiveness

EARLY YEARS

More
healthy
options and
healthy
eating

Improvement in
food service to
pre-school children

Reductions in dietary
intakes of fat and
improved weight
outcomes (1+)

A US-based study reported that a parent education programme
focusing on nutrition-related behaviour resulted in the intervention
group consuming significantly more fruits, vitamin-C-rich fruits, green
vegetables, breads, rice/pasta and orange vegetables than the control
group.157 Another study reported that attending educational sessions
significantly improved the frequency of parents offering their child
water.158 Furthermore, a systematic review reported beneficial effects
on the nutritional content of day-care menus.66



Education through
videos and
interactive
demonstrations

Changing food
provision at nursery

Small but important
beneficial effect as long
as interventions not
solely focused on
nutrition education (2+)



Provision of regular
meals in supportive
environment free
from distractions

Opinion of Guideline
Development Group
(GDG) (4)



More
physical
activity

Encourage parents
to engage in a
significant way in
active play, and
reduce sedentary
behaviour

Particularly effective (2+) One study reported that attending educational sessions significantly
improved the frequency of parents engaging in active play with their
child.158

A UK-based study was successful in significantly reducing television-
viewing (the primary aim of the study) but did not show significant
improvements in snacking or watching television during dinner.159

The UK-based MAGIC (Movement and Activity Glasgow Intervention in
Children) pilot study reported that a nursery-based structured physical
activity programme resulted in a significant improvement in children’s
physical activity levels.6



Structured physical
activity programmes
within nurseries

Limited evidence of
effectiveness (grade
pending)



Key points

Interventions should be tailored as appropriate for lower-income groups. • (1+)
2-5 years is a key age at which to establish good nutritional habits, especially when parents are involved. • (1+)
Interventions require some involvement of parents or carers. • (1+)

1
2

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Page 129

T
O

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L D

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1
2

1


Desired Interventions Evidence base Intervention Select
behaviour already in

place
intervention

Effectiveness Evidence Cost-
effectiveness

SCHOOLS

More Reduce Limited evidence that Three large-scale interventions aimed to modify school lunch provision: There is some
healthy consumption of interventions were one significantly reduced children’s total energy and fat intake;160 one evidence that
eating carbonated drinks effective in reducing reduced children’s fat intake but not total energy intake in school lunch school-based

overweight and obesity observations;161 and the last showed no difference in fat intake.162 One interventions can
(1++) additional study within the fruit and vegetable intervention review

showed that reducing relative prices of low-fat snacks was effective in
promoting lower-fat snack purchases from vending machines in
adolescents over one year.163

Analysis of the UK National School Fruit Scheme (now known as the
School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme or SFVS) showed that 4-6 year old
children receiving school fruit had a significantly higher daily intake
than controls (117g/day compared to 67g/day, respectively) but this
difference was not maintained two years after the intervention when
free fruit was no longer available.164

result in
cost-effective
health gains.
Both
interventions
identified
resulted in
weight loss at
acceptable costs.
(Wang et al,
2003165 (1+);
Wang et al,
2004166 (2+))

Increase fruit and (to
a lesser extent)
vegetable intake

Improve school
meals

Promote water
consumption

Effective in improving
dietary intake (1+)

Key point

Schoolchildren with the
lowest fruit and
vegetable intakes at
baseline may benefit
more from the
school-based
interventions than their
peers (2+)

More Promotion of less May help children lose Active play: A 12-week, US-based intervention promoting active play
physical sedentary behaviour weight (no grade) supplementary to usual PE among 9 year olds showed significant
activity (television watching) improvements in the intervention children compared with the controls,

Multi-component
interventions

Effective while
intervention in play (1+)

particularly among girls.167 Another study reported that a small
intervention over 14 months resulted in 5-7 year old children in the
intervention group being more active in the playground than the
control group children.168

PE classes: One study reported significant increases in moderate
physical activity among female adolescents, particularly ‘lifestyle’
activity, at four-month follow-up, following the promotion of
60-minute PE classes five days a week and associated education
classes.169

There is good corroborative evidence from the UK that ‘safer routes to
school’ schemes can be effective.170 A series of studies found that,
when both school travel plans and safer routes to school programmes
were in place, there was a 3% increase in walking, a 4% reduction in
single-occupancy car use and a 1.5% increase in car sharing. Bus and
cycle use remained largely static.171 Conversely, a series of selected case
studies found an overall increase in cycle use and a decrease in car
travel whereas the effects on walking and bus travel were variable.172

Another scheme also found a considerable increase in walking and
cycling to and from school three years after the intervention.173

Page 256

248
Healthy
Weight,
Healthy
Lives:
A
toolkit
for
developing
local
strategies


Acknowledgements

Financial
assistance


The National Heart Forum and the Faculty of Public Health would like to thank the Department of
Health for providing financial assistance for the production of this toolkit.

Project
Management
Group


Mr Paul Lincoln, National Heart Forum

Professor Alan Maryon­Davis, Faculty of Public Health

Ms Bronwyn Petrie, Department of Health

Mr Oliver Smith, Department of Health

Dr Kerry Swanton, KVS Consultancy

Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives: A toolkit for developing local strategies contains information which has been
adapted and reproduced from the NICE guideline on obesity with the intention of reflecting the content of
the guideline and facilitating its implementation. NICE fully supports this. NICE has not however carried out
a full check of the information contained in the toolkit to confirm that it does accurately reflect the NICE
guideline. Nothing should be regarded as constituting NICE guidance except for the wording actually
published by NICE.

Page 257

© Crown copyright 2008
283780 260p 5k Oct 08 (tbc)

Produced by COI for the Department of Health and the National Heart Forum.

If you require further copies of this title visit:
www.orderline.dh.gov.uk and quote:

283780/Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives: A toolkit for developing local strategies
or write to:

DH Publications Orderline
PO Box 777
London SE1 6XH
Email: [email protected]

Tel: 0300 123 1002
Fax: 01623 724 524
Minicom: 0300 123 1003 (8am to 6pm, Monday to Friday)

www.dh.gov.uk/publications

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http://www.dh.gov.uk/publications

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