Download Health and Physical Education PDF

TitleHealth and Physical Education
Tags
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.6 MB
Total Pages244
Table of Contents
                            PREFACE
	ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
	SUPPORTING STUDENTS’ WELL-BEING AND ABILITY TO LEARN
INTRODUCTION
	VISION AND GOALS OF THE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
	THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
	Fundamental Principles in Health and Physical Education
	FOUNDATIONS FOR A HEALTHY SCHOOL
	ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
THE PROGRAMIN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS
	THE STRANDS AND THE LIVING SKILLS EXPECTATIONS IN THE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
ASSESSMENTAND EVALUATIONOF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
	BASIC CONSIDERATIONS
	THE ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOR HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	THE ACHIEVEMENT CHART: Health and Physical Education, Grades 1–8
SOME CONSIDERATIONS FOR PROGRAM PLANNING IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES AND TEACHING STRATEGIES
	HEALTH AND SAFETY IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	CROSS-CURRICULAR AND INTEGRATED LEARNING
	PLANNING HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION NEEDS
	PROGRAM CONSIDERATIONS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
	ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS AND HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	EQUITY AND INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	FINANCIAL LITERACY IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	LITERACY, INQUIRY SKILLS, AND NUMERACY IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL LIBRARY IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS
	THE ROLE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
	EDUCATION AND CAREER/LIFE PLANNING THROUGH THE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
	ETHICS IN THE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
OVERVIEW OF GRADES 1 TO 3
	GRADE 1
	GRADE 2
	GRADE 3
OVERVIEW OF GRADES 4 TO 6
	GRADE 4
	GRADE 5
	GRADE 6
OVERVIEW OF GRADES 7 AND 8
	GRADE 7
	GRADE 8
APPENDIX Learning Summaries by Strand
GLOSSARY
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Health and
Physical Education

R E V I S E D

The Ontario Curriculum
Grades 1-8

2 0 1 5

Page 2

The Ontario Public Service endeavours to demonstrate leadership with respect to accessibility
in Ontario. Our goal is to ensure that Ontario government services, products, and facilities are
accessible to all our employees and to all members of the public we serve. This document, or
the information that it contains, is available, on request, in alternative formats. Please forward
all requests for alternative formats to ServiceOntario at 1-800-668-9938 (TTY: 1-800-268-7095).

Page 122

120

T
H

E
O

N
TA

R
IO

C
U

R
R

IC
U

L
U

M
, G

R
A

D
E

S
1


8

|
H

e
a

lt
h

a
n

d
P

h
ys

ic
a

l E
d

u
ca

ti
o

n

C. HEALTHY LIVING

G
R

A
D

E
3

Healthy Living Learning Summary for Grade 3: Key Topics*

Topic
C1. Understanding

Health Concepts
C2. Making

Healthy Choices
C3. Making Connections

for Healthy Living

Healthy Eating C1.1 Food origins, nutritional C2.1 Oral health, food C3.1 Local and cultural foods,
value, and environmental impact choices [PS] eating choices [CT]
[CT]

Personal Safety C2.2 Safety guidelines C3.2 Real and fictional
and Injury outside of class [CT] violence [IS]
Prevention

Substance Use, C1.2 Impact of use of legal/illegal C2.3 Decision making –
Addictions, substances substance use / behaviours
and Related [CT]
Behaviours

Human
Development
and Sexual
Health

C1.3 Healthy relationships [IS]

C1.4 Physical and emotional
development [PS]

C3.3 Visible, invisible
differences, respect [PS, IS]

* This chart is extracted from the complete Grade 1–8 Healthy Living Learning Summary chart on pages 224–225. The topics
are listed on the left, and the focus of each expectation is summarized briefly, to give teachers a quick overview of the strand.

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS
By the end of Grade 3, students will:

C1. demonstrate an understanding of factors that contribute to healthy development;

C2. demonstrate the ability to apply health knowledge and living skills to make reasoned decisions
and take appropriate actions relating to their personal health and well-being;

C3. demonstrate the ability to make connections that relate to health and well-being – how their
choices and behaviours affect both themselves and others, and how factors in the world around
them affect their own and others’ health and well-being.

SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS

C1. Understanding Health Concepts

By the end of Grade 3, students will:

Healthy Eating

C1.1 demonstrate an understanding of how the origins of food (e.g., where the food is grown, how it is
made) affect its nutritional value and environmental impact [CT]

Page 123

121

G
R

A
D

E
3

H
E

A
LT

H
Y

L
IV

IN
G

Teacher prompt: “What is the difference between processed and unprocessed foods –
for example, processed cheese and a wedge of cheese, toasted oat cereal and large-flake
oatmeal, a fruit roll-up and an apple?”

Student: “Unprocessed foods are foods that are raw or the way they were before they
were processed. Processed foods have been changed in some way to help preserve them
or make them more convenient to use or easier to sell.”

Teacher: “Processed foods lose some of their nutrients when they are manufactured.
How else are processed foods different from fresh foods in terms of nutrients? What is
the environmental impact of processed foods?”

Student: “Fresh foods can be healthier to eat. Processed foods have more sugar, salt, trans
fats, and other things added to improve the flavour or colour or to help preserve them.
The way processed foods are made and the way they have to be shipped can make air
pollution and other environmental problems worse. Manufacturing them can also make
water pollution worse, and the packaging they come in creates extra garbage.”

Substance Use, Addictions, and Related Behaviours

C1.2 demonstrate an understanding of different types of legal and illegal substance abuse (e.g.,
dependency on nicotine in cigarettes or caffeine in coffee, energy drinks, and colas, or sugar and salt in
sports drinks, or alcohol in beer, wine, and spirits) and the impacts of abusing these substances on
themselves and others (e.g., dependencies or addictions, financial stresses, legal issues, health issues,
environmental issues)

Teacher prompt: “When a family member is abusing alcohol, there is an impact on him
or her, but there is also an impact on others. What impact does it have on others in
the family?”

Student: “People who abuse alcohol may not be able to take good care of their families.
They may miss important events, spend money on alcohol that is needed for other things,
or get involved in arguments. Sometimes emotional or physical abuse happens in fam-
ilies if someone is abusing alcohol.”

Teacher: “Pop and sports drinks are not illegal substances, but consuming too much of
them can still lead to problems. What problems might be associated with drinking too
much of these kinds of drinks?”

Student: “Drinking too much of these drinks can give you more caffeine, sugar, or
salt than is good for your body. Too much caffeine can make you jittery or too excited
and may even make you addicted to caffeine. When you are addicted to caffeine, you
sometimes get a headache when you do not have the caffeine. Too much sugar can
lead to tooth decay. Too much salt makes your blood pressure go up and is not good
for the heart. Also, you can get too full drinking these drinks and then not eat enough
healthy foods.”

Human Development and Sexual Health

C1.3 identify the characteristics of healthy relationships (e.g., accepting differences, being inclusive,
communicating openly, listening, showing mutual respect and caring, being honest) and describe ways
of overcoming challenges (e.g., bullying, exclusion, peer pressure, abuse) in a relationship [IS]

Teacher prompt: “Consider different types of relationships – with friends, siblings, par-
ents, other adults – and think about the kinds of behaviour that help to make those
relationships healthier. What can you do if you are having problems with a relationship?”

Page 244

Printed on recycled paper
14-058

ISBN 978-1-4606-0390-1 (Print)
ISBN 978-1-4606-0391-8 (PDF)

© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2015

Similer Documents