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Table of Contents
                            HANDBOOK of PSYCHOLOGY
	Handbook of Psychology Preface
	Volume Preface
	Contents
	Contributors
	PART ONE CONTEXTS
		1 EVOLUTION: A GENERATIVE SOURCE FOR CONCEPTUALIZING THE ATTRIBUTES OF PERSONALITY
		2 CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
	PART TWO PERSONALITY
		3 GENETIC BASIS OF PERSONALITY STRUCTURE
		4 BIOLOGICAL BASES OF PERSONALITY
		5 PSYCHODYNAMIC MODELS OF PERSONALITY
		6 A PSYCHOLOGICAL BEHAVIORISM THEORY OF PERSONALITY
		7 COGNITIVE-EXPERIENTIAL SELF-THEORY OF PERSONALITY
		8 SELF-REGULATORY PERSPECTIVES ON PERSONALITY
		9 INTERPERSONAL THEORY OF PERSONALITY
		10 STRUCTURES OF PERSONALITY TRAITS
	PART THREE SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
		11 SOCIAL COGNITION
		12 EMOTION, AFFECT, AND MOOD IN SOCIAL JUDGMENTS
		13 ATTITUDES IN SOCIAL BEHAVIOR
		14 THE SOCIAL SELF
		15 PERSUASION AND ATTITUDE CHANGE
		16 SOCIAL INFLUENCE AND GROUP DYNAMICS
		17 ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
		18 CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS
		19 ALTRUISM AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
		20 SOCIAL CONFLICT, HARMONY, AND INTEGRATION
		21 PREJUDICE, RACISM, AND DISCRIMINATION
		22 JUSTICE, EQUITY, AND FAIRNESS IN HUMAN RELATIONS
		23 AGGRESSION, VIOLENCE, EVIL, AND PEACE
		24 PERSONALITY IN POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY
	Author Index
	Subject Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

HANDBOOK
of

PSYCHOLOGY

VOLUME 5

PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Theodore Millon

Melvin J. Lerner

Volume Editors

Irving B. Weiner

Editor-in-Chief

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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Subject Index 667

Schedule of Sexist Events (SSE), 528–529
Schindler, Oskar, 473
Schizophrenia, 13, 16, 127

behavior therapy and, 137
CEST and, 160, 163

Scree test, 239
Scripts, 125
Sears, David, 602
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), 104
Self:

collective, 343, 344
emotions and the interpersonal, 341–343
interpersonal, 328
possible, 186
private, 343
public, 343

Self-affirmation theory, 368
Self-categorization theory, 486–487
Self-confidence, 610, 619
Self-control, 327

self-defeating behavior and, 330
Self-deception, 335–336
Self-determination theory, 188
Self-disclosure, 343
Self-esteem, 327, 333

aggression and, 334, 335
attitude change and, 368
attitude function and, 306
CEST and, 162–163
collective identity and, 331, 489
communal norms and, 456
comparison and, 339–340
early-acquired motives and, 168
individualistic/collectivist cultures and, 40
interdependence and, 344
interpersonal relationships and, 332
movement, 346
prejudice and, 525–526
reflection and, 339
relationships and, 451
sociometer theory and, 328
violence and, 575, 577

Self-evaluation maintenance theory, 339–340
Self-fulfilling prophecy, 336, 478
Self-guide, 186
Self-handicapping, 341
Selfhood:

cultural variations, 343–344
historical evolution of, 344–346

Self-image bias. See Bias, self-image
Self-monitoring, 316–317, 340
Selfobjects, 123, 125
Self-organization, 202
Self-perception theory, 363, 369
Self-presentation, 336

cognition and, 337–338
favorability of, 336–337
harmful aspects of, 338

Self psychology, 9, 123–124
Self-regulation, personality and, 186–205
Self-report scales:

attitude and, 304–305
personality and definitions of, 233–234

Self-validation hypothesis, 366
Self-verification theory, 340–341

Sensation seeking, 97–102
Sensitivities, 168–169
Sequences, 189
Settings, behavior, 432–434
Sexuality:

libido, 125
mating, 18
self-presentation and, 338
See Psychosexual stage model

Sherif, Muzafer, 397–398, 487–488
Similarity, affinity and, 391–392
Simonton, Dean Keith, 601, 616
Six Culture project, 36, 41
Skinner, B. F., 135, 136, 138, 139, 141, 145
Smith, M. Brewster, 616
Smoking, morality and, 583
Sniderman, Paul, 618
Sociability, biological bases of personality and, 88–94
Social cognition:

automatic, 265–268
controlled, 265–266, 268–271
influences, 271–277
mental representations and, 259–260

associative network models, 258–262
distributed memory models, 263
exemplars, 264–265
schemas, 262–264

overview, 257–259, 277
Social comparison theory, 335
Social contract theories, 538. See also Personal contract
Social dominance orientation (SDO), 521–523
Social Dominance Orientation Scale, 514
Social dominance theory (SDT), 486, 520–522
Social exclusion:

aggressive behavior and, 328–329, 330
cognitive impairment and, 330–331
prosocial behavior and, 329, 330

Social facilitation effect, 402
Social identity theory (SIT), 333–334, 435, 486–487, 489, 492, 522
Social judgments:

core affect, 291–292, 294–295
cultural differences and, 284–285
emotion, scientific framework for, 292–294
emotion research programs, 285–290, 294–295
integration, 290–291
overview, 283–284
universal vs. cultural processes, 294

Social Justice Research, 549
Social learning theories, 135–137, 465–466, 469, 470, 471

aggression and, 570–571
Social psychology, 31–35, 153
Societal complexity, 343–344
Society for Interpersonal Theory and Research (SITAR), 209
Sociobiology, explanation of, 5–6
Sociometer theory, 328, 332–334
Space:

phase, 199–200
private, 423, 424
social, 406–408

Spence, Kenneth, 136, 140
Spencer, Herbert, 11, 13
Staffing theory, 433–434
Stanford-Binet: personality theory and, 149
Stephan, Cookie, 522
Stephan, Walter, 522

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668 Subject Index

Stereotyping. See also Social cognition
Steroid users, 105
Stigmatized identity, 331
Stone, William F., 600, 602
Strength, attitude, 310–311, 354
Stress, environmental psychology and, 429–430

stress-adaptation model, 430
Strivings, personal, 186
Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB), 213–215

reciprocity and, 215, 216–217, 221
Structural equation modeling (SEM), 522–523, 529
Studies on Hysteria, 119
Studies in Machiavellianism, 600
Sublimation, 125
Submission, authoritarian, 509
Suicide, 330
Superego, 121, 125
Suppression, thought, 269, 270
Sylvan Learning Centers, 138, 156
System concepts, 189

Taft, William, 619, 620
Temperament, 86–88, 611
Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), 63, 87, 92, 97
Terror management theory, 126, 274, 511
Terrorism, 582
Thematic apperception test (TAT), 180, 356, 357, 524
Thomas, Clarence, 171
Threat theory (ITT), integrated, 522–523
Tickle Me Elmo, 392
Tightness, 343
Toilet training, 120
Token economy, 138, 156
Tolman, Edward, 135–136, 137
Tomkins, Silvan, 286, 618
Topographic model of the mind, 119
Torture, 579
Toward a New Personology: An Evolutionary Model, 621–622
Transference, 177

CEST and, 167, 168
Tripartite theory, 353
Truman, Harry, 619, 620
Tupperware Corporation, 391
Twelve Angry Men, 400

UCLA, 138, 143
Unconditioned stimulus (UCS), 166
Unconscious:

explanation of, 119–120

primacy of, 118
See also Cognitive-experiential self-theory (CEST)

UNESCO, 591
United National Development Programme (UNDP), 582
United Nations:

Convention Against Torture, 579
General Assembly of, 591

University of California at Los Angeles, 138, 143
University of Chicago, 600
Utku, 283–284, 285, 294

Variables, personality, 316–317
Verbal-association repertoire, 144
Verbal-emotional repertoire, 145
Verbal-labeling repertoire, 144
Verbal-motor repertoire, 144
Verbal therapy, 156
Vibes, 161, 166–169, 176
Victim, blaming, 473, 541–542
Vietnam War, 399, 464, 540
Violence:

community, 577–579
hormones and, 105
personal, 574–577
societal, 579–582
structural, 582–583

Visuospatial scratch pad, 120
social cognition and, 269

Wallas, Graham, 600
Wal-Mart Canada, 301
Warfare:

civil, 581–582
gang, 578
interstate, 580–581

Washington, George, 620
Watersheds, 195
Watson, John, 135, 136, 137, 143, 150
Weather conditions, environmental psychology and, 427–428
Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI), 149, 154
Well-being, 448–449
Williams, Arland, 473
Wilson, Woodrow, 600, 603, 619, 620
Winter, David, 600, 602
Withdrawal, 188
Wolpe, Joseph, 137
Woodrow Wilson and Colonel House, 600

Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ), 87

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