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TitleGrowth is Dead, Long Live Growth The Quality of Economic Growth and Why it Matters
LanguageEnglish
File Size5.3 MB
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Table of Contents
                            Growth is Dead, Long Live Growth
The Quality of Economic Growth and Why it Matters
Contents
Foreword
Preface
List of Contributors
Introduction Growth is Dead, Long Live GrowthThe Quality of Economic Growth and Why It Matters
Part I Growth: A Path towards Abundance or Depletion?
	Chapter 1 What is the Quality of Growth?Sustainability and Inclusiveness
Part II The 20th Century Concept of Growth and Its Deliverables
	Chapter 2 Poor Trends: The Pace of Poverty Reductionafter the Millennium Development Agenda
		Chapter 3 Chronic Poverty in Rural Cambodia:Quality of Growth for Whom? ..
		Chapter 4 Does the Quality of Income Growth AffectChild Nutrition Status?
		Chapter 5 Disability and Growth Elasticity of Povertyin a Developing Country
Part III Different Growth, Different Outcomes    in Sustainability, Inclusiveness, and Resilience
	Chapter 6 Reflections on the Prospects for Pro-Poor Low-CarbonGrowth
	Chapter 7 Structural Transformation, the Quality of Growthand Employment Outcomes
	Chapter 8 The Elusive Quest for Inclusive Growth in Sub-SaharanAfrica: Regional Challenges and Policy Options
	Chapter 9 What are the Macroeconomic Impacts of NaturalDisasters? - The Impacts of Natural Disasters on theGrowth Rate of Gross Prefectural Domestic Product inJapan
Part IV Multiple Paths towards Quality Growth
	Chapter 10 Industrial Transformation and Quality of Growth
	Chapter 11 The Governance of Natural Resource Wealth: SomePolitical Economy Considerations on Enhancing SocialInvestment
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

JICA Research Institute

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J I C A R e s e a r c h I n s t i t u t e J a n u a r y 2 0 1 5

Growth is Dead,
Long Live Growth
The Quality of Economic Growth
and Why it Matters

Edited by

Lawrence Haddad
Hiroshi Kato
Nicolas Meisel

Page 2

Growth is Dead, Long Live Growth
The Quality of Economic Growth

and Why it Matters

Edited by

Lawrence Haddad
Hiroshi Kato

Nicolas Meisel

January 2015

Agence Française de Développement (AFD)

Institute of Development Studies (IDS)

Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

Page 175

166

Chapter 6

record far higher global shares for the former than the World Resources
Institute estimates reported here. The future evolution of these shares
depends obviously on the qualitative features of the growth paths taken
over the coming decades.

Figure 1� Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Source 2010
(Percentage shares in total GHG emissions)

Source: Author’s calculations based on World Resources Institute CAIT 2.0 Data Base
(accessed January 2014).

3� The Case for Low-Carbon Growth in Low-Income Countries

A key message of the previous section is the necessity to reconsider the
dominant notion that poorer countries in general and LDCs in
particular should focus on achieving growth and poverty reduction
along conventional lines first and start worrying about cuts in carbon
emissions at a later stage. This notion rests primarily on the argument
that the adoption of low-carbon technologies raises costs and consumer

Page 176

167

Reflections on the Prospects for Pro-Poor Low-Carbon Growth

prices in relation to conventional alternatives, entailing adverse impacts
on growth and hence poverty alleviation. A slow down in growth-
driven poverty reduction implies in turn a higher vulnerability to
climate change impacts. Moreover, early mitigation action would divert
attention, funding and scarce planning capacity away from more
pressingly needed adaptation investments. Further arguments in
support of the “grow first – decarbonise later” view are that low-carbon
technologies can be expected to be available at lower costs in the future,
and that on intertemporal equity grounds, the current poor should not
be obliged to incur consumption sacrifices in favor of future, supposedly
wealthier, generations.

However, this view requires qualification for a number of reasons. Most
importantly, it violates basic economic efficiency principles – and in
doing so ignores a potentially large source of gains from international
exchange for low-income countries: to achieve a given global GHG
emission target at minimum cost, the marginal GHG abatement costs
would have to be equalized across all regions of the world. In plain
language, it makes no sense to install low-carbon technologies in rich
region A at a cost of $50 per ton of CO2e avoided as long as the same
amount of emission reduction can be achieved at a cost of $10 per ton in
poor region B. Such mitigation cost differences imply the presence of
potentially large mutual gains from carbon credit transactions between
developed and developing countries. Quantitative estimates show a
huge potential for these mutual gains. A recent model-based global
study by Akimoto et al. (2010) indicates a far larger near-term low-cost
emission reduction potential up to 2020 in the developing non-Annex I
countries than in the in the developed Annex-I countries (Table 2). This
finding is consistent with the meta analysis of results from similar
model-based studies with a time horizon towards 2030 by van Vuuren et
al. (2009), which finds unanimous agreement among existing estimates
that the largest mitigation potentials are in non-OECD countries.

Page 349

340

genuine saving concept, of World
Bank, 27, 31–32
strong condition of, by High-Level
Panel of UN Secretariat, 27–31

Sustainability of growth, 284–290
Sustainable livelihood approach

(SLA), 92. See also Cambodia,
study on chronic poverty in

T
Tanzania, 223
Thailand, 270

automobile industry in, 275–276,
282–283

Tipping points, crossing of, 31
Togo, 218
Total Factor Productivity (TFP), 246
Total national wealth, 28
Typhoon Haiyan, 243

U
Uganda, 218, 223, 234
Undernutrition, 121, 126, 175, 176, 268.

See also Income growth and
nutrition status, relationship
between, study on

Unemployment, 7, 188, 193–197, 203,
206, 207, 212–214. See also
Economic growth, impact of, on
employment outcomes

United Nations Development
Programme (UNDP), 1

United Nations Environment
Program (UNEP), 285

Upfront investment cost, 45, 46
Urban framework, Africa, 233
Urbanization, 218, 220, 231–233, 236

V
Values, and beliefs, 23–24
Vietnam, 270
Vulnerable employment, 193

W
Within-sector productivity growth,

189, 191
World Bank, 1

on forms of capital, 32
genuine saving concept, 27, 31–32
on growth elasticity of poverty,
141–142
on inclusive growth, 7
on job challenges categories, 269
poverty reduction, 2013 declaration
on, 57

World Development Report (WDR) 2013,
230, 267

World Economic Forum’s Summer
Davos, on “Mastering Quality
Growth,” 267–268, 270, 294

World War II, 25

Z
Zambia, 202
Zero poverty, 85, 131
Zero stunting targets, 131
Zimbabwe, 218

Page 350

JICA Research Institute

J
IC

A
R

e
s
e

a
rc

h
In

s
titu

te
G

row
th

is D
e

ad
, L

o
n

g
L

ive
G

row
th

T
h

e
Q

u
ality o

f E
co

n
o

m
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row
th

an
d

W
h

y it M
atte

rs

L
aw

ren
ce H

ad
d

ad
H

irosh
i K

ato
N

icolas M
eisel

J I C A R e s e a r c h I n s t i t u t e J a n u a r y 2 0 1 5

Growth is Dead,
Long Live Growth
The Quality of Economic Growth
and Why it Matters

Edited by

Lawrence Haddad
Hiroshi Kato
Nicolas Meisel

ISBN:978-4-86357-066-5

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