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TitleGreen Growth, Green Profit: How Green Transformation Boosts Business
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.8 MB
Total Pages282
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Green Growth,
Green Profit
Contents
List of figures, tables, and boxes
Notes on the contributors
Acknowledgments
Executive summary
Part I The world goes green
	CHAPTER 1 The genesis and promise of the green business revolution
	Chapter 2 Electric mobility comes of age
	CHAPTER 3 Renewable energy advancing fast
	CHAPTER 4 How a green product lifecycle augments brand value
	CHAPTER 5 Germany — The greenest of all
Part II Regional spotlight
	CHAPTER 6 Germany — The greenest of all
	CHAPTER 7 Iberia — Giants and windmills
	Chapter 8 Iberia — Giants and windmills
	CHAPTER 9 Central and Eastern Europe – Business opportunities abound
	CHAPTER 10 The United States – A chance to reinvent itself
	CHAPTER 11 Brazil – World champion in renewable energy
	CHAPTER 12 China — Green on an unimaginable scale
	CHAPTER 13 Japan — A pioneer trying to set global standards
	CHAPTER 14 India — Cannot afford not to go green
	CHAPTER 15 MENA – A blueprint for sustainable living?
Part III Making Green Sustainable
	CHAPTER 16 Green finance and the new green gold
	CHAPTER 17 R&D innovation — Developing system solutions
	CHAPTER 18 Qualifications — Investing in education
	Outlook
Notes
Bibliography
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Green Growth, Green Pro�t

Page 141

126 Albernhe, Confais, Depoux, and Bernardin

some companies and within some sectors is a serious issue. A Roland
Berger Strategy Consultancy study showed that the level of maturity among
French companies is very limited: 76 percent of them make less than 10
percent of their revenues from green business activities. As a result, only
5 percent consider mainly focusing on green business, and only 22 percent
have created a dedicated business unit.

Page 142

127

ChAPTeR 8

Iberia – Giants and windmills
Ricardo Wehrhahn, João Saint-Aubyn, and
Javier Casas

Iberian companies are major players in the wind and solar energy sectors.
By investing in renewable energy, Spain and Portugal are seeking ways
to find cheaper energy alternatives for themselves and to create a niche as
exporters of green technology. As sunny and windy as Spain and Portugal
are, the sharp economic downturn could dampen growth and raise
questions about the efficacy of the subsidy regime to date. The threat of
a public backlash against renewable incentives is real, especially if power
prices increase. Regulatory instability and excessive bureaucratic red tape
create barriers. Spain is overhauling renewable energy regulation and the
stakes are high. While energy-efficiency measures and electric mobility
are overshadowed by renewable energies, these segments are growing in
importance.

Introduction
As member states of the European Union, both Spain and Portugal are
obliged to meet EU 2020 renewable energy targets. Nationally set legis-
lation in this field is in line with those targets. In Spain, the Directive
2006/32/CE was transposed in 2008 into a governmental 2008–12 energy-
saving and energy-efficiency plan. This was followed up with a set of
laws establishing energy-efficiency certificates for all types of buildings
and public lighting regulations. Despite its bold plans, Spain effectively
implemented less than 10 percent of its 25 efficiency measures between
2005 and 2008, according to a 2009 IEA study.
The installed generation capacity in Spain almost doubled from 48 GW in
1995 to 98 GW in 2009. The share of renewable energies in the country’s
generation mix went from being symbolic to accounting for more than 20
percent. Spain expects to exceed its 2020 targets, claiming that renewable

R. Berger, Green Growth, Green Profit
© Roland Berger Strategy Consultants GmbH 2011

Page 281

268 Index

value chain (cont.)
for photovoltaics, 61–2
policy instruments along, 20
for solar energy, 189
for wind energy, 52

Vattenfall, 109
vehicles

car sharing, 93, 95–6
efficiency in manufacture, 15
efficient engine technology, 113
electric see electric vehicles
emissions regulations, 25–6
flex-fuel, 169
fuel economy requirements, 154
hybrid, 84, 225
manufacturing industry, 30, 43–5,

75, 96–7, 107, 114, 154–6, 225,
227

market in China, 181
research and development, 31,

234–5
seat production, 78–9
volume of purchases, 27, 29–30,

38–9
see also e-mobility

Venezuela, 72
Vensys, 179
venture capital, 100, 210–11, 214–15

government, 213
Veolia, 112, 125, 147
Verbund, 145
Vestas, 51, 55, 129
Vierhout, Robert, 68–9
virtual power plants, 228–30
VOeC, 150
Voith Hydro, 73
Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS),

222
voluntary vs. mandatory agreements,

19–21
Voralberg, 36–7, 150
VW, 31

W
Walkers, 86

Walmart, 75–6
waste

avoidance, 15–16
as biomass, 180
as energy source, 16
management, 7, 111–12, 139,

147–9, 172, 234
municipal, 11
pollution from, 177
recycling of see recycling
size of market, 13
volumes and population growth, 9

water
agricultural demand for, 10
and climate change, 10
distribution technology, 11
efficient usage, 162, 204–5
heating, 190
heating and shampoo/detergent

footprint, 76–7, 80–1
infrastructure, 139–42, 172
need for clean(er), 7, 16
pollution, 176
purification plants, 113
quality, 141, 162
shortages and population growth,

8–9
sustainable management, 13,

112–13, 117, 125, 162, 234
treatment technologies, 16, 113
used by washing machines, 15
see also desalination

wave power, 73
White, Peter, 83
white certificate, 122
white goods, 15, 110, 182–3
wind energy, 22–3, 50–7, 108–9, 118,

120, 128–33, 152–3, 159–60, 170,
178–9, 187, 197
cost issues, 49, 53, 57, 74
finance for projects, 53
installation and maintenance, 242
manufacturers, 51–3, 55–6, 129,

133, 160, 179
offshore, 52–3, 109, 120, 160, 179

Page 282

269Index

repowering, 136
research, 160, 226–7
in Romania, 146
service providers, 89, 94–5, 97–8
in Spain and Portugal, 128–33
statistics, 50
supply chain, 56–7
technology, 47, 52–3, 55, 56–7,

160
wind towers, 205
window frames, eco-efficiency, 81–2
Windtec, 179
wood as fuel, 119
World Bank, 183, 204, 222

World Wind Energy Association, 50

Y
Yamada Denki, 189
Yes Bank, 199–200
Yingli Solar/Green Energy, 23, 61,

177
Yokohama, 192

Z
ZAP, 174
Zetsche, Dieter, 31
Zhengrong, Shi, 180

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