Download Going to Live on the French Riviera: The Cote D'azur (How to) PDF

TitleGoing to Live on the French Riviera: The Cote D'azur (How to)
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size9.5 MB
Total Pages233
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Preface
1 Welcome to the French Riviera
	The Côte d'Azur: the place and the people
	Practical help
	Particular locations
2 Finding somewhere to live
	Finding a property to rent
	Buying a property on the Riviera
3 Finding a job
	Working at home and long-distance commuting
	Working in France for a UK employer
	Finding a job on the Riviera
	Tax and Social Security contributions
	Useful websites
	ANPE offices
	Working from home
	Contracts of employment
	Pay and hours
	Dismissal
	Le chèque emploi service
	Setting up a business
	UK unemployment benefit
4 Finding a summer job
	A step towards permanent employment
	Job fairs
	Leisure industry opportunities
	Where to look for jobs
	Other opportunities
	ANPE
	Improving your chances
	Useful guides
	Temporary work agencies
	Seasonal contracts of employment
	Receiving UK unemployment benefit whilst in France
5 Studying on the Côte d'Azur
	University education
	Qualifications equivalence
	Studying French on the Riviera
	Studying French in the UK
6 Retiring to the Côte d'Azur
	Points to bear in mind
	Receiving your pension in France
	Approaching retirement
	Other UK benefits
7 Settling on the Côte d'Azur
	Your right to stay in France
	Importing your belongings
	Taking and looking after your pets
	Cars and driving
	Opening and running a bank account
	Home insurance
	UK state benefits
	French state benefits
	Your régime matrimonial
	Pacte civil de solidarité (PACS)
	La protection juridique
	Help with the authorities
	Energy audit
	Solar energy
	Air conditioning
	Electricity
	Emergencies
	Water
	The telephone
	Utility bills for the handicapped or those in receipt of RMI
	Mobile telephones
	The postal service
	Television and satellite receivers
	Internet
	Meeting French people
	French – acquiring the language
	Good and bad neighbours
	Cutting back trees and vegetation
	Consumer protection
	Trade estimates
	The black market
	Employing people in your home
	Moving house
	Voting
	Managing disabilities
	Insect stings
	Home security
	Lost property
	Taking French nationality
8 Schools
	Pre-school education
	Private French schools
	State schools
	Primary school (École primaire) 6 to 11 years
	Secondary school (Collège) 11 to 16 years
	Equivalent educational year groups in France and the UK
	Educating your child on the Côte d'Azur
	Learning French
	Private international schools
	Alternatives
	The private international and bilingual schools on the Côte d'Azur
	French state and private schools with Anglophone sections
	Applications to French state schools
	School children with special needs
	Useful addresses and websites
9 Health Services
	Quality of care
	Pressures on the French health system
	Médecin traitant
	Reimbursement of medical costs
	Care for the old and the infirm
	Child care
	Care for the physically and mentally handicapped
	Maternity services
	Hospital care
	Preventative health care
	Chemists (pharmacies}
	English-speaking doctors
	Your rights to medical cover and treatment
	La Carte Vitale
	Rates of reimbursement
	La mutuelle and private insurance
	Emergency telephone numbers
10 Shops, services, social groups and activities for English speakers
	Shops
	English language bookshops
	Banking
	Takeaway Indian food
	Doctors and dentists
	The Sunnybank Retirement Home
	Churches
	Sources of information in English
	Associations
	Films in English
	Private lessons
	English-speaking electrician
	English libraries
	English language magazines, newspapers and radio stations
	Marseille British Consulate's emailing list
11 Leisure time on the Côte d'Azur
	Beaches
	The region's lakes
	Horse racing
	Skiing
	Day trips
	Culture in France
	Restaurants
	Evening entertainment
	Holidays from Nice
12 Activities for children
	Theme parks
	Beach clubs (Clubs de plage)
	Museums more suited to children
	Trips at sea
	Ice skating
	Tennis
	Go-karting
	First flying lessons
	Zoos
	Caves
	Parks and open places
	Toy shops
	Children's clothes shops
	Sick and handicapped children
	Les centres de loisirs
	Les centres d'information jeunesse
	Children travelling alone
Appendix 1: Useful addresses
	British embassy
	Other embassies
	The French embassy, UK
	L'institut français
	Centre français de Londres
	General information
	Banks
	Business
	Churches
	Employment
	English bookshops
	English language newspapers
	Expat websites
	Financial advisers
	French government websites
	Learning French
	Lawyers
	Removal firms
	Satellite installers
	Transport
	Yellow Pages
	Local information
	Les caisses d 'allocations familiales
Appendix 2: Transport to and on the Côte d'Azur
	Nice Côte d'Azur airport
	Toulon airport
	Cannes-Mandelieu airport
	Genoa and Turin airports
	Flights from Nice Côte d'Azur airport to local airports
	Buses on the Côte d'Azur – a new deal!
	Family discounts on public transport
	Ferry services
	Bus and coach companies' contact details
	Transport for the handicapped
	Contacting those at sea
	L'automobile club Nice Côte d'Azur
Appendix 3: Clothes sizes
	Women
	Men
	Children
Appendix 4: Further reading
	Books about France
	Books about the Riviera
Index
	A
	B
	C
	D
	E
	F
	G
	H
	I
	J
	L
	M
	N
	O
	P
	R
	S
	T
	U
	V
	W
	Z
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

G O I N G T O L I V E O N T H E

FRENCH
RIVIERA

Page 116

7 - SETTLING ON THE COTE o'Azun

make friends and acquaintances. Parents with children at school
often have opportunities through the school and through their
children of meeting French people. The French are generally
slower than Anglo-Saxons at 'breaking the ice' and you may need
to discretely take the initiative. You should try not to call on your
French friends and neighbours without an invitation or at least a
warning.

FRENCH -ACQUIRINGTHE LANGUAGE

French is a difficult language, even for the French. School children
in France certainly spend considerable time mastering their
language. However, if you are serious about integrating into France
or wish to confidently handle day-to-day relations with French
people and deal with emergency situations, you need to be able to
speak and to understand French with ease.

In the UK

It is a good idea to begin studying the language before moving to
France. There are, of course, many night classes in French up and
down the UK. Those living in London or Manchester should take
advantage of the courses run by the French Institute. The Alliance
Francaise runs courses in Bath, Belfast, Bristol, Cambridge,
Exeter, Glasgow, Jersey, Milton Keynes and York as well as
London and Manchester.

In France

Once on the Cote d'Azur you will find that many local councils and
branches of the AVF arrange French classes, all of which are

97

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GOING TO LIVE ON THE FRENCH RlVIERA

inexpensive. The ANPE holds free classes in French for the
unemployed. In addition there are several private organisations that
run courses (see for example in The French Directory: Learn in
France at www.europa-pages.com). You can study for GCSE and A
level through the National Extension College. It is also possible to
study with the Open University which has a diploma in French and
a degree in Modern Language Studies. (For further information on
the OU, see Chapter 5.) Another option is an External Degree in
French Studies at London University. Alternatively you could study
for one of the examinations to determine your level of French held
by the French authorities, such as the Diplome d'Etude de la
Langue Frangaise.

The expression 'use it or lose it' applies as much to the acquisition
of French as it does to retaining your knowledge. Converse in French
as much as you can. The most effective way is also the most
economic: make French friends. The second most effective means,
also inexpensive, is to watch French television, especially those
programmes that are the easiest to follow such as children's cartoons.
News presenters are amongst the clearest speakers. Translations of
American and British films are usually far easier to follow than
French films which tend to contain more colloquial terms.

GOOD AND BAD NEIGHBOURS

The French are much more formal than Anglo-Saxons or Celts. The
Australian soap Neighbours lasted only a very short time on French
television before it was withdrawn: the content was just too foreign
and unfamiliar to French viewers. It is nevertheless a good idea to
introduce yourself to your neighbours, and try to establish a good
rapport at an early stage. If you live in a flat you could take

98

www.europa-pages.com

Page 232

INDEX

flying lessons, 168
France, sources of help and information,

7-9, 88, 149, 175
French Embassy, UK, 174
French language, 97-8, 174-5

go-karting, 169
Grasse, 183

healthcare, 132-42
care for the aged, 135
care for the disabled, 136
carte vitale, 140
childcare, 135
dentists, 146
doctors, 132-3, 146-7
emergency numbers, 141-2
English-speaking doctors, 138
flu vaccine, 137
French health system, 132-3
hospital care, 137
language difficulties, 138
maternity care, 136
medecin traitant, 134
mutuelle, 141
opticians, 147
pressures on French health system,

133
private insurance, 141
quality of care, 132
reimbursement of medical expenses,

134-5, 140-1
retirement home (English), 147
rights to medical care, 138-9
vaccinations, 107

heating, 88-91
home insurance, 85
home security, 103-4
horse racing, 161

ice-skating, 167
importing your belongings, 75
information, sources of, 7-9, 88, 149, 175
insect stings, 103
insurance

car, 81
household, 85

legal, 87
institutfrangais, 174
internet, 96

jobs, see employment
Job Seeker's Allowance, 54

lakes, 160
language, learning French, 97-8, 174-5
lawyers, 178
leisure time, 157-64
libraries, English, 154-5
local information, 181-5
lost and found, 78, 104

Mandelieu-La-Napoule, 11, 191
Monaco, 13
money, transferring to France, 84
Mouans-Sartoux, 184
Mougins, 11-12, 184
moving house, 102
museums, 162, 166

nationality, taking French, 90, 105
naturist beaches, 159
neighbours, 98-100
Nice, 2, 9-10, 181-2
Nice airport, 186-90

off-shore banking, 84-5

Pacte Civil de Solidarite, 43, 87
pensions, 72-3
pets, 75-9
postal services, 94-5
practical help, 7-9, 88, 149, 175
protection juridique, 87
Provence, 1
purchase of your home, 26-31

radio, English, 155
regime matrimonial, 87
removal firms, 178-9
renting, 14-26

before moving in, 22-4
deposit, 18-19
disputes, 25

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GOING TO LIVE ON THE FRENCH RlVIERA

Etat des Lieux, 23
eviction by landlord, 19-21
finding a home to rent, 14-16
furnished tenancies, 25
insurance, 22
inventory, 23
leaving, 24
length of tenancy, 19-21
maintenance of property, 21-2
married couples, 17
notice to leave, by tenant, 24
precautions to take, 22-4
protection of tenants, 17
renewal of tenancy, 20
rent, 19
rental agreement, 17-18
right of first refusal, 26
sale by landlord, 26
short tenancies, 21
subletting, 18
visiting the property, 16
working from home, 22
written contract, request for, 17

restaurants, 162-3
retiring to the Cote d'Azur, 71-4
right to stay in France, 75
Riviera, meaning, 1
road accidents, 81

SARL, 52
satellites, 95-6, 179
schools, 106-31
separation des biens, 87
settling in, 75-105
skiing, 161-2
social charges/social security

contributions, 43
solar energy, 89
Sophia Antipolis, 51

state benefits, British, 54, 74, 85-6
state benefits, French, 86
studying on the Cote d'Azur, 67-70

Open University, 69
studying French, 70
University, 67-8

tax, income, 43-4
telephone, 92-4
television, 95-6
tennis, 167-8
theme parks, 165
Toulon airport, 191
toyshops, 169-70
transferring money to France, 84
transport information, 179-81, 186-95

airlines, 179-80
buses, 190, 193-4
ferries, 180, 193-4
rail, 180
road, 181

unemployment benefit, 54
unmarried couples, 87
utilities and utility bills

electricity, 90-1
energy audit, 88
water, 92

vegetation, cutting back, 99
Villefranche-sur-mer, 12-13
Villeneuve-Loubet, 184
voting, 102

water supply, 92
working in France see employment

zoos, 169

206

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