Download Freakshow: First Person Media and Factual Television PDF

TitleFreakshow: First Person Media and Factual Television
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.0 MB
Total Pages205
Document Text Contents
Page 1

��������

����
���������
�������������������

��

Jon Dovey


����� �
����

Prelims.p65 12.06.00, 14:123

Page 2

�����������������������������������
�������� ������� �!������"#����
������$$��%�����������
���� �&������’ �(����)##*��)� �+&�
,����������,��-

.�����’���/�
���
���������

0�����’����1�
���
�����������������1�������������������1������ ���������������������
�����-��������������� ��������.�����’�� �
���’�������������������)2$$,

3�������!�������.�����’���’����������������
���
��������’����������1��������������������������1��-�����3�������!������

4&3"���5����)���������
4&3"���5����)���������

!��������1�.��’�����.�����’��’����������������
���


���� �
��,
�������� �6�1������������-���������1������������������7�
���
����,

�, �-,
4&3"��85���8)���8��9���:
),�����������������������’��-�,��,�0������� �,��,�
���-�����������������

���’��-�,�4,�0����,

�")22�,$,����
#$�����
52),��;#<���) ��8��#���


���’�����������������1�����������������
.����������������&�������
0�������1��-���������=����� �=���� �3������
���������������>��������+��������0
�4������������ �������

Prelims.p65 12.06.00, 14:124

Page 102

25

������’��1��������1���������0(������������������������������� ��������’��1���
������������-����-�����������������-������’����������’������������� ��
���������������������-�����1��������������� ��-������� ������������������*
1�������������1����G��������,

F����������������������������������������������-�������������-����’�
���������� ����������� ����������������������1�������������������1��-���1
��������������’��--���������,�
����!��’����������1�������� ���� ����*
�����0(������������1��-���������������������1������D�����������������������1
��������������0���� ����������������������’������1�����C’����������D,���I���
��������������������������-��’�������������� �������-���������D��������*
���� ���������� ������-����-�’������� ���������������������-������1����
������������-����1��������������-��1���������������������1��-�����,�0��
��������1�����1������� ������� ��� ���������������� �������� ����������������
������������1�����11������1������� ������������������-�����1�����F����������
�����1������������,

3�����G��’��-��������������������1��-��������������1�����-��0(��������
���-������-� �������������������������������������’����������-���������*
-�������������6�C0�������������1���� ��������-���������6�1�������1���������-��
��������������������� ������������������������’��������’�� � ��1���� ����
����� ������������������� �����1�������������������������� ��1���� ����
���1������������������� �����1������� �������������������������������1���*
����’���,D��

0����������������-������-��������������1����������� ���������������1����*
���������B������1��-������� �1���1�’��������������-��������������’�������-�
�11������ ���1�����-�� ��������� ����-����������� ����������� ��1������� ����*
������1����������,�0�������������������-��������’���������������������’�����
�’������1��������������������������������������-��’����� �������8�����*
�������������1����������,���-������� �’�������������’�������������1����������
������’������������� ��������������������������� ����1�� ����������-�� ���
�����1������������� ����������,�4��������������0(�’����� ���������C’��������� D
�����-��’����� ������,�0��������G����C����’�������G��D ������-���������*
������������1������������,�0����1���’�������’��1��������-��’���������������
�������B���������1�����������1�����[email protected]�����-�����������������8�1��-�����������
������������������,�0����’���������������)22����������������1��������������
1��-*-����’�1����������1���������’�-��������-������������������������-��*
’������������������������������������������������-����������������������
��������0(������-����,�4�����������������1�����������������������������
���������������� ������������������--��������������������--���������*
���� ����������-�����������������1�������1������ ������������ ��,�+�����
�������1�����1�����C����������������D ����-����� ������ ��������� ������������
���������8�������������������1�-��������������1��������������������������

�������������8���*��� ��’���������0(

Dovey.p65 12.06.00, 14:1497

Page 103

98

from peaceful sleep after we have switched off the TV. Of course all kinds
of potentially disruptive conflicts do arise but are smartly closed down
within the comforting integrity, the honest working unity of the protec-
tors. Each ‘community’ of emergency service workers are like a microcosm
of the state in which, despite all the conflicts, drama and tension, the job
gets done. Britain can (still) take it, through the integrity and honesty of its
dedicated men and women of action.

����,���! ����4��
��

The aspect of narrative structure that I wish to emphasise most is the cru-
cial importance of closure. In the case of the Trauma TV story we know as
we sit down to watch that the victims are going to pull through – otherwise
they wouldn’t be there. Neither the victims nor the emergency services
would serve their own interests by telling us stories about dead victims. In
the case of the crime story the drive to closure is represented by the impera-
tive to solve the crimes: either we are being recruited to help solve the crime
by providing information, as in the case of Crimewatch-type programmes
or we are shown a disproportionately high ‘clear up’ rate in the case of
programmes like Blues and Twos or Cops. In a rigorous piece of textual analy-
sis research conducted in 1992, Mary Beth Oliver coded 57.5 hours of US
Reality crime programmes (Cops, Top Cops, FBI, The Untold Story, American
Detective).46 She concluded that the clear-up rates in her sample were 61.5
per cent of all crimes shown. This compared with FBI statistics for actual
clear-up rates of only 18 per cent for the same period. The implications of
this finding for a form proposing itself as ‘Reality TV’ are startling. In these
terms we might rather begin to see the term ‘Reality TV’ itself as a classic
example of media doublespeak, meaning the absolute opposite, ‘Fantasy
TV’; a genre which has less to do with traditional documentary or public
service factual programming, which address a consensually recognised
shared material world, but in fact inhabits the liminal space of panic and
anxiety. Reality TV speaks precisely about our fantasies and fears, which
of course are structured not around wildly impossible realms of the imagi-
nation but around the very day-to-day anxieties and horrors which are
the matter of its stories.

The pervasive backbeat of autonomous threat is perhaps one of the most
characteristic features of the genre. The primacy of individual survival in
the face of this threat is constantly emphasised. Awareness of this impera-
tive of individual responsibility is seen as a component of good citizenship.
Deviant behaviours or criminal activity are simply ‘out there’, pathologised
but never explained. The emergency service personnel here become the

Freakshow

Dovey.p65 12.06.00, 14:1498

Similer Documents