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TitleFlip your classroom.pdf
TagsClassroom Teachers Teaching Schools
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Total Pages124
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Title Page
Copyright
About the Publishers
About the Authors
Contents
Foreword
Chapter 1: Our Story: Creating the Flipped Classroom
Chapter 2: The Flipped Classroom
Chapter 3: Why You Should Flip Your Classroom
Chapter 4: How to Implement the Flipped Classroom
Chapter 5: The Flipped-Mastery Classroom
Chapter 6: The Case for the Flipped-Mastery Model
Chapter 7: How to Implement the Flipped-Mastery Model
Chapter 8: Answering Your Questions (FAQs)
Chapter 9: Conclusion
Back Cover
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Education/Technology

Audience
Educators (5–12),
teacher educators,
administrators, policy
makers, curriculum
specialists, technology
coordinators

FeAtures
An argument for
and overview of the
flipped and flipped
mastery classrooms

The logistics of
conducting a flipped
classroom, from the
equipment needed to
create videos to what
to do during class to
student assessment

A FAQ section that
addresses important
topics, including
computer access,
administrator buy in,
and making sure your
students are reliably
accessing content on
their own time

Keywords
Flipped classroom,
differentiated
instruction, vodcasts

It started with a simple observation: Students
need their teachers present to answer questions or
to provide help if they get stuck on an assignment;
they don’t need their teachers present to listen to
a lecture or review content. From there, Jonathan
Bergmann and Aaron Sams began the flipped
classroom: Students watched recorded lectures
for homework and completed their assignments,
labs, and tests in class with their teacher available.
Bergmann and Sams found that their students
demonstrated a deeper understanding of the
material than ever before. Learn what a flipped
classroom is and why it works, and get the
information you need to flip your own classroom.
You’ll also learn the flipped mastery model, where
students learn at their own pace.

Once you flip, you won’t want to go back!

Jonathan Bergmann received the Presidential
Award for Excellence in Math and Science
Teaching in 2002 and was named a semifinalist
for the Colorado Teacher of the Year in 2010.
He is the lead technology facilitator for the
Joseph Sears School in Kenilworth, Illinois.

Aaron Sams received the Presidential Award
for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching
in 2009 and co-chaired the committee to
revise the Colorado Science Academic Standards.
Sams holds an MAEd from Biola University
and is a classroom science teacher in Woodland
Park, Colorado.

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Jonathan Bergmann
Aaron Sams

EUGENE, OREGON • WASHINGTON, DC AlExANDRIA, VIRGINIA

Page 62

Flip Your Classroom 51

5Chapter

Mastery learning has been around for quite some
time. It was first introduced in the 1920s, but it got
little attention until the 1960s, when it was popu-
larized by Benjamin Bloom. He likened our present
educational institutions to a race where only the
fastest learners were rewarded. He argued that
almost all students can master any content, given
enough time and support. When mastery learning
was implemented well, studies showed that nearly
80% of all students could learn all of the important
content compared to 20% taught with the tradi-
tional model.

The basic idea of mastery learning is for students
to learn a series of objectives at their own pace.
Instead of all students working on the same topics

Flipped-Mastery
the

Classroom

Page 63

Flip Your Classroom

CHAPTER 5 The Flipped-Mastery Classroom

52

at the same time, all of them work toward predetermined objec-
tives. Mastery learning is usually done in a course with a discrete
body of knowledge in which mastery of one objective is necessary
for success in all subsequent objectives.

The key components of mastery learning are:

• Students work either in small groups or individually at
an appropriate pace.

• The teacher formatively assesses students and gauges
student understanding.

• Students demonstrate mastery of objectives on summative
assessments. For students who do not master a given objec-
tive, remediation is provided.

Most of the research on mastery learning shows improvement
in student achievement. Other outcomes cited are increased
cooperation among students, increased student self-assurance,
and students receiving a second chance at demonstrating mastery
of a given objective. During the 1970s, mastery learning received
a lot of attention, but it has now been largely abandoned in favor
of the model seen in most brick-and-mortar schools. Most schools
found it too difficult to implement the mastery system. Reasons
cited for the difficulty included how often teachers must repeat
themselves, how many different assessments must be written, and
the difficulty of assessing so many objectives at the same time.

But we’ve moved on from the 1960s and 1970s. The technology
explosion has made many of the difficulties of mastery learning
easier to overcome. Essentially what we have done is leverage
technology to make mastery possible. Our prerecorded videos
have created an environment in which the burden of repetition is
placed on the student. No longer is the teacher physically needed
to reteach most topics. Students can simply rewatch or more fully
engage with the instructional video. The teacher can then spend
more quality time physically reteaching the students who most
need the additional instruction.

Page 123

Flip Your Classroom

CHAPTER 9 Conclusion

112

We both believe that good teaching happens in the context of
healthy student–teacher relationships. Students need to see adults
as mentors and guides instead of experts from on high. Teachers
need to see students not as helpless kids who need to be spoon-
fed their education, but rather as unique individuals who require
a unique education. The flipped and flipped-mastery models have
allowed us to empower students to want to learn more content
more deeply in an interactive, relationship-rich environment that
helps them succeed.

Now we charge you, our reader, with the challenge to go out and
do whatever it takes to think differently about education. Though
you may not adopt our models fully, we encourage you to ask one
question: “What is best for kids?” Then go and do it.

Page 124

Education/Technology

Audience
Educators (5–12),
teacher educators,
administrators, policy
makers, curriculum
specialists, technology
coordinators

FeAtures
An argument for
and overview of the
flipped and flipped
mastery classrooms

The logistics of
conducting a flipped
classroom, from the
equipment needed to
create videos to what
to do during class to
student assessment

A FAQ section that
addresses important
topics, including
computer access,
administrator buy in,
and making sure your
students are reliably
accessing content on
their own time

Keywords
Flipped classroom,
differentiated
instruction, vodcasts

It started with a simple observation: Students
need their teachers present to answer questions or
to provide help if they get stuck on an assignment;
they don’t need their teachers present to listen to
a lecture or review content. From there, Jonathan
Bergmann and Aaron Sams began the flipped
classroom: Students watched recorded lectures
for homework and completed their assignments,
labs, and tests in class with their teacher available.
Bergmann and Sams found that their students
demonstrated a deeper understanding of the
material than ever before. Learn what a flipped
classroom is and why it works, and get the
information you need to flip your own classroom.
You’ll also learn the flipped mastery model, where
students learn at their own pace.

Once you flip, you won’t want to go back!

Jonathan Bergmann received the Presidential
Award for Excellence in Math and Science
Teaching in 2002 and was named a semifinalist
for the Colorado Teacher of the Year in 2010.
He is the lead technology facilitator for the
Joseph Sears School in Kenilworth, Illinois.

Aaron Sams received the Presidential Award
for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching
in 2009 and co-chaired the committee to
revise the Colorado Science Academic Standards.
Sams holds an MAEd from Biola University
and is a classroom science teacher in Woodland
Park, Colorado.

Flip
Y

o
u

r C
lassro

o
m



Flip Your Classroom

B
erg

m
an

n
• Sam

s

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