Download Firs aid in armed conflicts and other situations of violence - ICRC PDF

TitleFirs aid in armed conflicts and other situations of violence - ICRC
LanguageEnglish
File Size5.4 MB
Total Pages295
Table of Contents
                            FIRST AID in armed conflicts and other situations of violence
	FOREWORD
	Table of contents
	1 Introduction
	2 Armed conflicts and other situations of violence
		2.1 Types of situations
		2.2 Special characteristics
	3 First Aider preparedness
		3.1 The humanitarian role of First Aiders
			3.1.1 Know and respect the distinctive emblems and the basic rules protecting individuals
			3.1.2 Strengthen your moral standing and the image of the Red Cross and the Red Crescent
		3.2 The duties and rights ofFirst Aiders
			3.2.1 Duties of First Aiders
			3.2.2 Rights of First Aiders
		3.3 Specific training programmes
			3.3.1 Technical skills
			3.3.2 Personal capabilities
		3.4 Equipment of First Aiders
		3.5 Preparatory plans
			3.5.1 As a rule
			3.5.2 During the mobilization phase
			3.5.3 On site
		3.6 Coping with stress
	4 Caring for casualties
		4.1 Goals and responsibilities
		4.2 Context
			4.2.1 Threats
			4.2.2 Specific health problems
		4.3 Main operational principles for providing care
			4.3.1 The chain of casualty care
			4.3.2 Communication, reporting and documentation
		4.4 Your approach on the spot
	5 Situation management
		5.1 Safety and security
			5.1.1 Your personal safety
			5.1.2 Security assessment of the scene
		5.2 Casualty protection
			5.2.1 Emergency removal of a casualty
		5.3 One casualty or many?
		5.4 Seeking help
		5.5 Alert
	6 Casualty management
		6.1 Initial examination and immediate life-saving measures
		6.2 Complete examination and stabilization measures
		6.3 Special cases
			6.3.1 Anti-personnel mines and other explosive remnants
			6.3.2 Tear gas
			6.3.3 The dying and the dead
			6.3.4 Cardiac arrest
	7 Situation of mass casualties: triage
	8 After providing care on the spot
		8.1 At the collection point and in the next links in the casualty-care chain
		8.2 Transportation
			8.2.1 Prerequisites
			8.2.2 Means and techniques of transport
	9 Other tasks of First Aiders
	10 After the intervention
		10.1 Management of yourself
			10.1.1 Debriefing
			10.1.2 Relaxation
		10.2 Management of equipment and supplies
		10.3 Awareness of explosive remnants of war
		10.4 Contributions to the recovery of the population
			10.4.1 Red Cross/Red Crescent presence
			10.4.2 Promotion of humanitarian work
			10.4.3 First Aid training
	Life-saving techniques
		6.1.1 Airway: assessment and management
		6.1.2 Breathing: assessment and management
		6.1.3 Circulation: assessment and management of visible haemorrhage
		6.1.4 Disability: assessment and management
		6.1.5 Exposure: assessment and management
	Stabilization techniques
		6.2.1 Head and neck injuries: assessment and management
		6.2.2 Chest injuries: assessment and management
		6.2.3 Abdominal injuries: assessment and management
		6.2.4 Back of the chest and abdomen injuries: assessment and management
		6.2.5 Limb injuries: assessment and management
		6.2.6 Wounds: assessment and management
	Annexes
		1 Glossary
		2 Mechanisms of injury
		3 First Aid kit/bag
		4 Leading a First Aid team
		5 The chain of casualty care
		6 First Aid post
		7 New technologies
		8 Safe behaviour in dangerous situations
		9 Collecting and burying the dead
	ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
	COMMUNICATION MESSAGE AND INTERNATIONAL ALPHABET
	ESSENTIALS OF INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW (IHL)
	THE DISTINCTIVE EMBLEMS
	NORMAL VALUES OF PEOPLE AT REST
	CASUALTY REGISTRATION LIST
	HYGIENE AND OTHER PREVENTIVE MEASURES
	THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE INTERNATIONAL RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT MOVEMENT
	STRESS SELF-EVALUATION TEST
	HOW TO PRODUCE DRINKABLE WATER
	HOW TO PREVENT WATERBORNE DISEASES
	IN CASE OF DIARRHOEA
	MEDICAL CARD
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

FIRST AID
in armed conflicts and other situations
of violence

FIR
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0 International Committee of the Red Cross
19, avenue de la Paix
1202 Geneva, Switzerland
T + 41 22 734 60 01 F + 41 22 733 20 57
E-mail: [email protected] icrc.org
© ICRC, April 2006

Page 2

FIRST AID
in armed conflicts and other situations
of violence

FIR
ST A

ID
in

a
r

m
ed

c
o

n
flic

ts a
n

d
oth

er
situ

atio
n

s
o

f vio
len

c
e

08
70

/0
02

0
6.

20
10

2
50

0 International Committee of the Red Cross
19, avenue de la Paix
1202 Geneva, Switzerland
T + 41 22 734 60 01 F + 41 22 733 20 57
E-mail: [email protected] icrc.org
© ICRC, April 2006

Page 147

10.2 Management
of equipment
and supplies

You should help take care of equipment and supplies,
even if there is someone else in charge of that.

MANAGEMENT OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES

1. Evaluate their use: think about quantity and
quality.

2. Decide: to maintain operational capacity.
3. Act: check and if necessary replace or replenish

equipment and supplies.

CHECKLIST

AFTER
AN

INTERVENTION

Evaluate Decide Act
Availability of personal
and team equipment and
supplies?

Carry out equipment
maintenance
Repack supplies

Clean and replace supplies
where needed
Prepare equipment for the
next mission
Return your shirt or vest
displaying a distinctive
emblem at the end of your
duties if required

10 After the intervention

139

Page 148

10.3 Awareness of explosive
remnants of war

You may be confronted in peacetime with casualties
of military-related explosions in areas affected by an
armed conflict in the recent or remote past.

Explosive remnants of war include:
• unexploded ordnance (cluster bomblets, bombs,

and shells that did not explode on landing);
• landmines or improvised explosive devices, which

remain active after hostilities have ended.

All have the capacity to kill and injure. Even a small
movement might be enough to set one off.

You must follow the guidelines just as you would
during a period of armed conflict.

You must help to build the capacity of communities
threatened by explosive remnants of war:
• to prevent incidents by raising awareness of the

dangers;
• to react to any new casualties by taking measures

to save lives and limbs.

This should be done by involving the community
fully in the development and implementation of an
action plan in close cooperation with health and
other public authorities, the military, as well as with
non-governmental organizations (e.g. those involved
in mine-clearance operations) if present.

[see Annex on CD-ROM– Major
weapon-related threats; Annex 2
– Mechanisms of injury]

[see Section 6.3.1 – Anti-personnel
mines and other explosive remnants
of war]

FIRST AID

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Page 294

FIRST AID

Place First Aider Casualty no.
Date __ /__ / __ Time (24 hours)

Family name

First name

Other name (father)

Sex Age Home address

Coming from

Time of injury (24 hours)

o Gunshot wound

o Fragment

o Mine/ERW

o Blast

o Burn

o Blow

o Road crash

o Fall

o Other

o Allergy

Other medical problems

Home treatment

FRONT BACK

RIGHT LEFTLEFT RIGHT

Penetrating wound Bleeding

Other wound or burn Bone trauma

Disability
Motor Sensitive

MEDICAL CARD

sheet 2010.indd 19 28.05.10 07:33

Page 295

Triage o I (Urgent) o II (Serious) o III (Wait) o IV (None)

Evacuation to
Date__ / __ / __ Time: (24 hours) By (on foot, taxi, etc.):

Medical exam by
Place

Date__ / __ / __ Time: (24 hours)

Pulse BP

Resp APVU

o Compressive bandage (24 hours)

o Recovery position (24 hours)

o Artificial ventilation (24 hours)

o Tetanus

o Antibiotics

- mg (24 hours)

- mg (24 hours)

o Painkiller

- mg (24 hours)

- mg (24 hours)

o Other drugs

- mg (24 hours)

- mg (24 hours)

o IV access since (24 hours)

o IV fluids

- Litres

- Litres

o Intubation (24 hours)

Death Location oduring evacuation
Date__ / __ / __ Time: (24 hours)

sheet 2010.indd 20 28.05.10 07:33

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