Download Finding lost childhoods : supporting care-leavers to access personal records PDF

TitleFinding lost childhoods : supporting care-leavers to access personal records
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.9 MB
Total Pages219
Table of Contents
                            Acknowledgements
Contents
About the Author
List of Abbreviations
List of Boxes
1: Introduction
	The Nature of the Records
	Significance of the Records
	Access to Records Policy and Practice
	Life History and the Person-Centred Approach of the Book
	Outline of the Book
	Participants’ Biographical Summaries
		Amelia
		Andrew
		Brian
		Debbie
		Dianne
		Elaine
		Glenn
		Graeme
		Irene
		Jack
		Lyn
		Meg
		Nicole
		Ray
		Roseanne
	References
Part I: The Significance of Care Records
	2: Making Sense of a Childhood in Care
		Memory and Personal History
		Records and Personal History
			Filling in the Gaps
			Finding Family
			Making Sense of a Childhood
		Supporting Records Release: Respect and Belief
		Conclusion
		References
	3: Making Sense of Care Records
		Vindicating Memories
		Constructing Life Stories from Records
		Missing Records
		Supporting Records Release: Counselling and Contextualisation
		Conclusion
		References
	4: The Impact on Care-Leavers of Information in Their Records
		Family Relationships
			Finding Family
			Changing and Affirming Family Relationships
		Identity
			Challenging Feelings of Shame, Blame and Abandonment
			Enriching Aboriginality
		Supporting Records Release: Responding to the Aftermath
		Conclusion
		References
Part II: Accessing Records
	5: Helping Care-Leavers to Find Their Records
		Knowing that There Are Records
		Knowing How to Find the Records
		Time to Access Records
		Fees to Access Records
		Staff Attitude to Care-Leavers Making a Request for Their Records
		Supporting Records Release: Engagement and Communication
		Conclusion
		References
	6: Supporting Care-Leavers to Receive Their Records
		Presentation of the Records
		Receiving the Records
		Impact of Third-Party Deletions
		Supporting Records Release: Compassion and Care
		Conclusion
		References
	7: Facilitating Care-Leavers’ Access to Other Sources of Information and to Family
		Other Sources, Other Information
		Finding Family Without Records
		Facilitating Family Reunion
		Supporting Records Release: Finding Family
		Conclusion
		References
Part III: Supported Release
	8: Good Practice in Care-Leavers’ Records Release
		Key Elements of Good Practice in Accessing Records
			Manage and Promote Records Collections
			Respect and Believe
			Offer Support
			Prepare the Records Carefully
			Provide Maximum Information
			Provide Sources of Contextual Information
			Make Photos Available
			Support Access to Other Information
			Facilitate Family Reunion
		Education, Training and Professional Development
		Supervision and Peer Support
		Advocacy
		Conclusion
		References
	9: Conclusion
Appendix 1: Sources of Support and/or Information
	Australia
		Alliance for Forgotten Australians
		Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
		Care Leavers Australasia Network
		Child Migrants Trust
		Find and Connect
		Link-Up Victoria (and similar in other Australian States and Territories)
		National Archives of Australia (and similar in each Australian State and Territory, sometimes known as a Public Record Office)
	Canada
		Library and Archives Canada
	Ireland
		Barnardos Ireland Origins Tracing Service
		National Archives of Ireland
	New Zealand
		Archives New Zealand
		Care Leavers Australasia Network
	United Kingdom
		Care Leavers Association
		Child Migrants Trust
		National Archives
		National Records of Scotland
		Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
	International
		Salvation Army Family Tracing Service
References
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

SUELLEN MURRAY

finding
lost

chi ldhoods
Supporting Care-Leavers to Access

Personal Records

Page 2

Finding Lost Childhoods

Page 109

101

Flinders Island when Roseanne was very young and that the woman was
her mother. Roseanne said that her aunt explained that:

‘you kids used to play in the grass and your mum or I used to watch’. She said
‘that would have been your mum with the black hair’ … ‘that was your mum.
Standing in a distance just watching over every single one of you’ … ‘she was
so petri�ed that one of you’d get bitten by a snake. And she said ‘yous’d giggle
and play roly-poly, peekaboo’ … ‘you just loved that, you know?’

Roseanne’s memories were revealed to be part of her childhood in a lov-
ing family in a close-knit Aboriginal community. �e revelation that she
had an Aboriginal mother and siblings who had continued to live with
their Aboriginal extended family had a huge impact on her, and this was
to ‘turn her life upside down’.

Supporting Records Release: Responding
to the Aftermath

As these accounts testify, records can provide information that is life
changing. When working with care-leavers it is important to be aware of
the impact their records can have and also o�er support. As we discussed
in Chap. 3, counselling support should be routinely o�ered to care- leavers
when they are accessing their records. Specialist skills and knowledge are
necessary to ensure that this support work is conducted with cultural
sensitivity. For example, in Australia, the organisation Link-Up provides
specialist services to Indigenous people. Link-Up provides support to
Indigenous Australians to access their records as well as to reunite with
their families.

Information about additional sources of support can also be provided.
Care-leaver advocacy organisations provide assistance in accessing records
and often sponsor self-help groups where their members can gain support
from each other through the knowledge of shared experiences. As well,
as noted by Moore et al. (2015: n.p.), these ‘peer support networks …
not only provide informal support, but also encourage participants to
take up other services such as psychotherapy and counselling.’ In e�ect,

Supporting Records Release: Responding to the Aftermath

Page 110

102

peer support ‘can help inform decisions about navigating and negotiat-
ing therapeutic services’. In the UK, the Care Leavers’ Association has
worked to produce positive change in records release in that country.
�rough their Careleavers Reunited social networking website they pro-
mote connections between care-leavers and provide opportunities to
create and join groups of care-leavers (Care Leavers’ Association 2016).
In Australia, the Care Leavers Australasia Network (2016) can support
care-leavers to access their records, and the Child Migrants Trust (2016)
provides specialist social  work services to support family reunions for
former child migrants. As well, the Find and Connect support services
provide assistance to access records and some sponsor support groups.

Many record-holding organisations do not currently o�er family trac-
ing and reunion services, and yet �nding family is of great importance
to many who grew up in care. �ose organisations that do o�er this
support tend to be support services whose speci�c intention is to facili-
tate family reunion and accessing records is undertaken as a stepping
stone to achieve family reuni�cation. Examples of such organisations are
the Australian Indigenous specialist service Link-Up, Barnardos Ireland
Origins Tracing Service and the Child Migrants Trust. Some record-
holding organisations have invested in their workforce and also specialise
in care-leaver’s family tracing and reunion, such as MacKillop Family
Services (Murray et al. 2008; Murray 2015). Just over half of the local
authorities (38 out of 70) which participated in research concerned with
access to records in the UK provided assistance in searching for birth
relatives (Goddard et al. 2005: 83). As we shall see in Chap. 7, special-
ist skills are needed to undertake such work. However, that there is a
demand for this work suggests that record holders need to reconsider the
resourcing of their activities to ensure this support is available to those
care-leavers who request it. In the meantime, where such assistance is not
available, record holders have a responsibility to ensure care-leavers are
provided with information about how they might �nd and make contact
with their families. Tracing and mediation services can assist care-leavers
but usually at some �nancial cost to them.

As noted by Murray et  al. (2008: 248), ‘�nding and reading their
records may be part of a much longer process of making sense of the
information obtained.’ Records access and its aftermath can take place

4 The Impact on Care-Leavers of Information in Their Records

Page 218

215 Index

I
identity, 1–3, 5, 6, 10–13, 18, 29,

56, 57, 83, 90–101, 103, 140,
142, 145, 158, 159, 161, 164,
166, 170, 184, 189, 193,
194, 196

inaccuracies in records, 22, 72, 73
institutional reunions, 108, 171
intermediary, 167–9, 172, 182, 185
international reunions, 171

K
Koorie Heritage Trust, 115, 120,

167

L
life history, 1, 5, 19–23, 57, 103
Link-Up, 101, 102, 116, 120,

166–8, 184, 186, 198

M
MacKillop Family Services, 102,

121, 122, 138, 171
maximum release of information,

177, 180
memory, 2, 6, 9, 13, 18, 39–41, 46,

75, 89, 90, 96, 107
military records, 10, 26, 46, 110, 152
missing records, 74–7
moral ownership, 18

N
newspapers, 84, 111, 113, 153, 156,

162, 168, 181

O
Open Place, 18, 116, 117, 120, 187
organisational records, 79, 139

P
parents, 1, 7, 8, 10, 13, 16, 24–6,

28, 29, 39, 42, 44, 46–8, 51,
53, 54, 56, 69–71, 74, 76, 77,
92, 93, 95, 99, 113, 116, 122,
140, 143, 150, 152, 158, 163,
178, 196

peer support, 24, 101, 102, 177,
185–7, 189, 190, 196

personal records, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9,
14–16, 20, 21, 24, 39, 54, 56,
57, 71, 81, 90, 103, 108, 111,
117, 119, 125, 130–1, 136,
139, 149, 178, 180, 187, 189,
193

person centred approach, 19–23, 54,
127, 145, 177, 195

photos, 7, 15, 42, 51, 57, 80, 86, 92,
109, 133, 153, 154, 156,
161–3, 178, 181

Post Care Forum, 186, 188
practical support, 81, 109, 177
preparation of records, 177
presentation of records, 127–30,

145, 195
privacy, 16, 18, 56, 71, 73, 77, 78,

108, 135, 137, 140, 180, 183,
189, 194

privacy legislation, 73, 137, 189
professional development, 6, 177,

182–5, 189, 196
professional networks, 109
public inquiries, 2, 11, 194

Page 219

216 Index

R
records collections, 110, 178–9
records management, 8, 15, 61, 74,

76, 181–3, 195
records release sta�, 183
redaction, 14, 16–17, 55, 71, 78,

130–1, 135–7, 140–5, 180
respect, 6, 19, 21, 53–7, 71, 78,

108, 118, 119, 142, 179,
180, 195

return to community reunions,
171

return to country reunions, 171

S
siblings, 1, 16, 24–9, 39, 40, 42, 44,

48–50, 66, 70, 72, 84–7, 89,
91, 100, 101, 109, 114, 116,
133, 137, 140, 141, 149–51,
159, 163–5, 181

social history, 9, 80, 138, 139, 180
social media, 168, 181
stigma, 51, 90, 92, 95, 96, 119

Stolen Generations, 3, 15, 96, 99,
164, 167, 169, 170, 184

supported release, 5, 13, 17, 22–4,
54–7, 77–81, 101–3, 120–5,
138–45, 165–72, 177–90,
195-6

T
third party deletions, 14, 16–17,

140–5, 180
time limits, 56, 123, 125
trauma, 124
trauma informed practice, 124

U
United Nations Convention on the

Rights of the Child, 3, 18

W

West Sussex County Council, 122–3
Who Am I? project, 15

Similer Documents