Download Faculty of Engineering Handbook 2003 PDF

TitleFaculty of Engineering Handbook 2003
LanguageEnglish
File Size12.5 MB
Total Pages164
Table of Contents
                            Faculty of Engineering Handbook 2004
	University dates
	Contents
	Message from the Dean
	Letter from the SUEUA President
	1 Guide to the Faculty
		The branches of Engineering
	2 Undergraduate degree regulations
		University of Sydney (Coursework) Rule 2000 (as amended)
		University of Sydney (Coursework) Rule 2000 (as amended)
			Rules relating to Coursework Award Courses
		Bachelor of Engineering
	3 Bachelor of Engineering specialisation requirements
		Faculty of Engineering : Flexible First Year
		School of Aeronautical, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering
			Aeronautical Engineering
			Aeronautical Engineering (Space Engineering)
			Mechanical Engineering
			Mechanical Engineering (Space Engineering)
			Mechatronic Engineering
			Mechatronic Engineering (Space Engineering)
			Mechanical Engineering (Biomedical)
		Department of Chemical Engineering
			Chemical Engineering
		Department of Civil Engineering (including Project Management)
			Specialisation Requirements : Civil Engineering (except Project Engineering and Management)
			Project Engineering and Management
		School of Electrical and Information Engineering
			Computer Engineering
			Electronic Commerce
			Electrical Engineering
			Software Engineering
			Telecommunications Engineering
		Faculty-wide electives and Advanced Engineering
			Faculty-wide elective subjects and Advanced Engineering
	4 Undergraduate units of study
		Aeronautical Engineering
		Chemical Engineering
		Civil Engineering
		Electrical Engineering
		Mechanical Engineering
		Interdisciplinary
		Other Faculties
	5 Postgraduate units of study
		Aeronautical Engineering units of study
		Chemical Engineering
		Civil Engineering
		Electrical Engineering
		Mechanical Engineering
		Project Engineering
		Interdisciplinary
	6 Other Faculty information
		The Faculty
		List of staff by departments
			Aerospace,Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering
			Chemical Engineering
			Civil Engineering
			Electrical and Information Engineering
		Scholarships and prizes
		The major industrial project placement scheme for undergraduates (MIPPS)
		Student facilities and societies
		A short history of the Faculty
		Foundations
	7 General University information
		Accommodation Service
		Admissions Office
		Applying for a course
		Assessment
		Careers Information
		Casual Employment Service
		Centre for Continuing Education
		Centre for English Teaching
		Child care
		The Co-op Bookshop
		Counselling Service
		Disability Services
		Enrolment and pre-enrolment
		Examinations
		Fees
		Financial Assistance Office
		Freedom of information
		Graduations Office
		(Grievances) appeals
		HECS and PELS
		Information Technology Services (ITS)
		International Student Centre
		Koori Centre and Yooroang Garang
		Language Centre
		Learning Centre
		Library
		Mathematics Learning Centre
		Part-time, full-time
		Privacy
		Scholarships for undergraduates
		Student Centre
		Student identity cards
		The Student Intranet
		Student Services
		The Sydney Summer School
		Timetabling unit
		University Health Service
		Student organisations
			Students’ Representative Council
			Sydney University Postgraduate Representative Association (SUPRA)
			Sydney University Sport
			University of Sydney Union
	Abbreviations and Glossary
		Acronyms
		Glossary
	Index
	Main campus map
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Mechanical Eng (Biomedical).eps


The University of Sydney
Faculty of Engineering
Handbook 2004

Page 2

Mechanical Eng (Biomedical).eps


University dates

University semester and vacation dates 2004 Last dates for withdrawal or discontinuation 2004
Summer School
Lectures begin Monday 5 January
Lectures end Friday 20 February

Semester 1
Lectures begin Monday 8 March
AVCC Common Week/non-teaching Easter
Period

Friday 9 April to Friday
16 April

Last day of lectures Friday 11 June
Study vacation: 1 week beginning Monday 14 June to

Friday 18 June
Examination period Monday 21 June to

Saturday 3 July
Semester ends Saturday 3 July
AVCC Common week/non-teaching period Monday 5 July to

Friday 9 July

Semester 2
Lectures begin Monday 26 July
AVCC Common Week/non-teaching period Monday 27 September

to Friday 1 October
Last day of lectures Friday 29 October
Study vacation Monday 1 November to

Friday 5 November
Examination period Monday 8 November to

Saturday 20 November
Semester ends Saturday 20 November
University semester and vacation dates 2004–2006 are listed on
the University Web site at www.usyd.edu.au/fstudent/undergrad/
apply/scm/dates.shtml.

Semester 1 units of study.
Last day to add a unit Friday 19 March
Last day for withdrawal Wednesday 31 March
Last day to discontinue without failure (DNF) Friday 30 April
Last day to discontinue (Discontinued – Fail) Friday 11 June

Semester 2 units of study.
Last day to add a unit Friday 6 August
Last day for withdrawal Tuesday 31 August
Last day to discontinue without failure (DNF) Friday 17 September
Last day to discontinue (Discontinued – Fail) Friday 29 October
Withdrawal from intensive units of study
offered at any time.
Last day to withdraw from an intensive unit
with a duration of less than six weeks.

Close of business on
the first teaching day.

Last day to withdraw from an intensive unit
with a duration of six weeks or more but less
than that of a standard semester.

Close of business on
the fourteenth day after
teaching has
commenced.
The University of Sydney
NSW 2006
Phone: (02) 9351 2222
Web: www.usyd.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering
Phone: (02) 9351 2534
Fax: (02) 9351 4654
Web: www.eng.usyd.edu.au

The University of Sydney Faculty of Engineering Handbook 2004.
© 2003 The University of Sydney. ISSN 1034-2648.
CRICOS Provider Code 00026A.
The information in this handbook is subject to approval and/or change by
the appropriate faculty of the University. Students should always check
the accuracy of the information with faculty staff.
Produced by the Publications Office, The University of Sydney, with the
assistance of Tim Mansour from Neologica Print & Promotions,
Ph: 0500 846 000, Fax: (02) 9212 2491, email: [email protected]
Printed by National Capital Printing, Fyshwick, ACT.

http://www.eng.usyd.edu.au

Page 82

Mechanical Eng.eps


UNDERGRADUATE UNITS OF STUDY Chemical Engineering
Materials selection and design. High temperature corrosion and
oxidation.
Textbooks
Fontana Corrosion Engineering 3rd edn (McGraw-Hill, 1986)
Reference books
Uhlig and Revie Corrosion and Common Control 3rd edn (Wiley, 1985)
Pourbaix Atlas of Electrochemical Equilibria in Aqueous Solutions

(NACE, 1974)

CHNG 2701 Fundamentals of Bioprocess
Engineering 1

4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: one lecture per week and two
tutorial/project/lab sessions per week for one semester. Prerequisite:
Advisory prerequisite: CHEM 1101, CHEM 1102. Assessment: Tutorials
35% projects 35% and final examination 30%.
Second year elective unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives
To understand the major metabolic pathways of the cell.
• To understand the role of biochemistry in Biochemical

Engineering.
• To understand how chemical engineering fundamentals are

relevant to the study of biochemistry.
Syllabus
Major macromolecules of the cell: carbohydrates, proteins,
lipids, nucleic acids.
• Enzymes: structure and function, enzyme kinetics, enzyme

recovery and purification.
• Major metabolic pathways: carbohydrate metabolism, citric

acid cycle, lipid metabolism, oxidtive phosporylation,
nitrogen metabolism.

Textbooks
Biochemistry, L. Stryer 4th edition, WH Freeman and Co. NY

CHNG 2702 Fundamentals of Bioprocess
Engineering 2

4 credit points. Session: 2. Classes: one lecture and two tutorial/project/
labs per week for one semester. Prerequisite: advisory prerequisite:
CHEM 1101, CHEM 1102, CHNG 2701. Assessment: Laboratory 35%
projects 35% and final examination 30%.
Second year elective unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives
To study practical aspects of the application of biochemistry to
industrial processes.
Syllabus
Molecular biology basic concepts; Introduction to Immunology;
Biochemistry and medicine.
Laboratory projects
Enzyme reactions, Protein separation, Electrophoresis,
Chromatography.
Textbooks
Biochemistry L. Stryer 4th Ed- W.H. Freeman and Co, NY.

CHNG 3001 Chemical Engineering Laboratory
4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: Laboratory sessions as scheduled.
Prerequisite: Advisory prerequisite: CHNG 2101 Chemical Engineering
2A; CHNG 2102 Chemical Engineering 2B. Assessment: Written
laboratory reports (including skills assessment in planning and executing
experiments) and oral presentation of work.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
To develop skills in the following:
• the planning and conducting of laboratory-scale experiments.
• report writing and oral presentations.
Syllabus Summary
This laboratory course complements the various ‘Unit
Operations’ courses in 3rd Year.

As part of the preparation for any experiment, a student will
be expected to undertake the following:
• become familiar with the background theory
• understand the operation of the experimental apparatus
• define the experimental aim, the range of measurements to be

made and how these measurements will be processed.
Considerable importance is attached to the analysis and

interpretation of the experimental data and to the writing of a
clear, logical and concise technical report.

CHNG 3101 Unit Ops (Heat Transfer)
4 credit points. Session: 2. Classes: Three hours of lectures/tutorials per
week for one semester. Prerequisite: Advisory prerequisite: CHNG 2101
Chemical Engineering 2A; CHNG 2102 Chemical Engineering 2B.
Assessment: Tutorial assignments; final examination.
76
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
To develop an understanding of how basic heat-transfer theory is
applied to the performance analysis and design of heat-transfer
equipment.
Syllabus Summary
Revision of overall heat-transfer coefficient. Fouling factors.
Heat exchanger performance analysis and effectiveness – NTU
approach. Design and rating problems. Plate and frame heat
exchangers. Shell-and-tube heat exchangers: 1–2, 2–4 contacting
schemes. Thermal analysis. Estimation of heat-transfer rates and
pressure drop. Practical considerations in design and selection.
Condensation heat-transfer mechanisms. Nusselt analysis.
Correlations. Design and practical applications. Boiling heat-
transfer mechanisms. Nucleate and flow boiling. Evaporators and
reboilers. Radiation fundamentals. Black and non-black
radiation and absorption. Radiation interchange between black
and grey bodies. Electrical analogies. Reradiating surfaces. Gas
radiation. Furnace calculations.

CHNG 3102 Unit Ops (Mass Transfer)
4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: Three (3) hours of lectures and
tutorials per week for one semester. Prerequisite: advisory
prerequisites: CHNG 2101 Chemical Engineering 2A; CHNG 2102
Chemical Engineering 2B. Assessment: Tutorial assignments (both
individually and in small groups) and a final examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives
To develop an understanding of several industrially important
mass transfer operations (such as distillation, gas absorption and
extraction).

To be able to analyse and design equipment used for such
mass transfer operations.
Syllabus Summary
Diffusion and convection principles. Mass transfer as an
equilibrium stage process. Vapour-liquid equilibrium (ideal and
non-ideal). x-y and T-x-y diagrams. Flash distillation. Analysis
and design of binary distillation columns as continuous contact
and equilibrium stage processes. McCabe-Thiele diagrams.
Analysis and design of other mass transfer operations (such as
gas absorption) as continuous contact and equilibrium stage
processes. Computer-based physical property packages and mass
transfer calculations.

CHNG 3103 Unit Ops (Particle Mechanics)
4 credit points. Session: 2. Classes: Three (1 hr) lectures/tutorials per
week for one semester. Prerequisite: advisory prerequisites: CHNG
2101 Chemical Engineering 2A; CHNG 2102 Chemical Engineering 2B.
Assessment: Assignments, and a final examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
To develop an understanding of the following:
• The characteristics of particles.
• The processing of particulate systems.
Syllabus Summary
Introduction to particulate systems, particle size and shape
parameters, size distributions and statistical properties, test sieve
analysis. Screening, particle-screen mechanics, efficiency of
screening. Size reduction, energy requirements, classical laws,
product size distribution. Motion of a particle in a fluid, terminal
velocity, hindered settling. Phase separations, classification,
elutriation, thickening, cyclones, centrifuging. Motion of fluids
in particle beds, filtration, filters.

CHNG 3104 Unit Ops (Fluid Mechanics)
4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: Four hours of lectures and tutorials
per week for one semester. Prerequisite: advisory prerequisites: CHNG
2101 Chemical Engineering 2A; CHNG 2102 Chemical Engineering 2B.
Assessment: Tutorial assignments and final examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
To develop an understanding of:
• non-Newtonian flows
• compressible fluid flow
• other fluid flows.

Students will develop skills in:
• solving problems in non-Newtonian flow
• solving problems in compressible fluid flow

Page 83

Mechanical Eng.eps


Chemical Engineering UNDERGRADUATE UNITS OF STUDY
• understanding the unusual phenomena in some non-
Newtonian and compressible flow situations

• designing power inputs to agitated vessels.
Syllabus Summary
Non-Newtonian fluids. Models of non-Newtonian fluids; power
law fluids, Bingham plastics. Velocity distribution and pressure
drop in pipes. Compressible flow in nozzles and pipes.
Isothermal and adiabatic flow; critical pressure conditions.
Maximum flow through nozzles and pipes. Two-phase flow, flow
regimes, calculation of pressure drop in pipes. Mixing in agitated
vessels. Turbine power characteristics in tanks.

CHNG 3105 Thermodynamics 1
4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: Two (1hr) lectures plus one (1 hr)
tutorial per week for one semester. Prerequisite: advisory prerequisites:
CHNG 2101 Chemical Engineering 2A; CHNG 2102 Chemical
Engineering 2B. Assessment: Assignments; final examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
The major objectives are:
(i) To perform energy analyses of process flowsheets.
(ii)To estimate the thermodynamic properties of fluids.

Specifically, this involves solving the energy equation for
equipment items such as: valves, pumps, compressors, turbines,
heaters and coolers, reactors and burners; and for flowsheets and
cycles made up of those equipment items.
Syllabus
First and second laws of Thermodynamics; thermodynamic
properties: enthalpy, internal energy, entropy, exergy.
Applications in the analysis of typical energy intensive
processes: heat engines; refrigeration cycles; liquefaction
processes; compressible flow.

Estimation of thermodynamic properties of pure components,
using (i) first-order fluid models, (ii) charts and tables, and (iii)
equations of state. P-V-T relationships for real gases; methods
based on the principle of corresponding states; 2- and 3-
parameter equations of state; the fundamental property
relationships; calculation of residual enthalpies and entropies
using volume-explicit equations of state (eg, the virial equation
in volume-explicit form); application of pressure-explicit
equations of state in computer methods for property prediction.

CHNG 3106 Thermodynamics 2
4 credit points. Session: 2. Classes: Two (1hr) lectures plus one (1 hr)
tutorial per week for one semester. Prerequisite: Advisory prerequisite:
CHNG 3105 Thermodynamics 1. Assessment: Assignments; final
examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
The major objectives are:
(i) To understand the theoretical basis for equilibrium in

multiphase systems and reacting systems.
(ii)To introduce the thermodynamic concepts: chemical

potential, fugacity, activity, and excess properties.
(iii)To predict the behaviour and compositions of liquids and

vapours in equilibrium.
(iv)To predict the composition of systems in chemical

equilibrium.
Syllabus
Criteria for equilibrium. Extension of the fundamental property
relationship to multicomponent systems. Thermodynamic
properties: Gibbs Free Energy, chemical potential, fugacity;
calculation of fugacities of pure components from equations of
state. Clausius-Clapeyron equation.

Phase equilibrium: Equilibrium diagrams for low pressure
ideal and non-ideal solutions; equilibrium diagrams for high
pressure systems; calculation of dew points, bubble points;
isothermal and adiabatic flash. Estimation of K-values using:
ideal solution fugacities, activity coefficients, chart data. Basis of
computer methods for calculating K-values.

Solution properties: Liquid models; partial molal properties;
excess properties; activity coefficients. Stability of liquid
solutions.

Chemical equilibrium: Calculation of chemical equilibrium
constants from thermodynamic data (enthalpies and free energies
of formation). Calculation of equilibrium compositions and
conversion for homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.
CHNG 3107 Reaction Engineering 1
4 credit points. Session: 2. Classes: Three hours of lectures/tutorials per
week for one semester. Assessment: Tutorial assignments; final
examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
The technical objective in this course is to develop students’
understanding in basic design considerations for chemical
reactor design, and in carrying out the necessary design
calculations.

Students will develop generic skills in:
• tackling open-ended problems requiring a synthesis of

material learned previously with new learning;
• application of computational techniques to unfamiliar

problems.
Syllabus Summary
Homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics; development
of rate laws. Methods for analysis and interpretation of reaction
rate data. Volume change effects. Steady-state behaviour of
isothermal ideal reactors: batch; plug flow; continuous stirred
tank; packed-bed reactors for catalysed reactions.

CHNG 3301 Process Modelling
4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: Two (1 hr) lectures and one (1 hr)
tutorial per week for one semester. Prerequisite: Advisory prerequisite:
CHNG 2301 Chemical Engineering Computations. Assessment: Tutorial
assignments (individually and in small groups) and a final examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
To develop an appreciation for the following:
• The different techniques used to develop and solve process

models.
• The way process models are used in industry.
• The role of modern computer software in process modelling.
Syllabus Summary
Uses for process modelling (such as process optimisation).
Physical modelling and the role of dimensionless correlations.
Empirical modelling (line of best-fit; variable transformations;
multilinear regression). Linear programming. Steady-state and
dynamic mechanistic (heat and mass balance based) modelling.
Numerical methods relevant to model solution. Use of software
packages in process modelling.

CHNG 3302 Process Control 1
4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: 4 hrs/week of lectures and tutorials
for one semester. Assessment: Tutorial assignments and a final
examination.
Third year core unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
It is expected that students will understand the principles of
dynamic modelling and the basics of process control.
Syllabus Summary
The role of control in chemical processes. Development of
dynamic models. Analytical and numerical solution of dynamic
models. Laplace transforms. Transfer functions. Dynamic
analysis of first-order, second-order and higher order systems.
Introduction to feedback control. Types of controllers. Closed-
loop characteristic equation. Stability analysis. Controller
design. Process reaction curve method. Use of MATLAB.

CHNG 3303 Flowsheeting and Optimisation
4 credit points. Session: 1. Classes: 3 hours/week (consisting of a
mixture of lectures, tutorials and laboratory sessions) for one semester.
Assessment: Tutorial assignments and project work.
NB: Department permission required for enrolment. Students
enrolled in the Process and Computer Systems Engineering
stream must enrol in this unit of study.
Third year elective unit of study for the degree in Chemical
Engineering.
Objectives/Outcomes
It is expected that students will understand the principles and
usage of a range of process flowsheeting technologies, as well as
the means available for optimising flowsheet behaviour.
Syllabus Summary
Need and uses of process flowsheeting; alternative approaches to
flowsheeting; key unit operations; performance and design
calculations; consideration of process dynamics; aspects of
process optimisation; commercial flowsheeting and design
software.
77

Page 163

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ic

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C

ha
nc

el
lo

r

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