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TitleExperiment 2 Kinematics of Human Motion
TagsMotion (Physics) Velocity Acceleration Experiment Kinematics
File Size1.1 MB
Total Pages8
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Experiment 2: Kinematics of Human Motion
Laboratory Report

Praiseus Acao, Aime Rose Alberto, Aldrin Agawin, Samuelle John Aquino

Department of Math and Physics
College of Science, University of Santo Tomas

España, Manila, Philippines

Abstract

Kinematics is a branch of classical
mechanics describing the motion of bodies
and systems without considering the mass of
an object and the force behind an event.
There are four activities in this experiment,
first is graphical analysis of human motion
and it involves displacement vs. time and
velocity vs. time with a graph given. Second
graph matching where experimenters will
copy the pattern given by the file in the
computer. Third, graphical analysis of
motion where in a span of 10 seconds the
total displacement is 2.49 m, average
velocity is 2.49 m/s and the instantaneous
velocity is 4.98 m/s2. Last would be the
reaction time, members of the group
measured their normal reaction time from
0.0186-0.243

1. Introduction

Life is in constant motion. Mastery
of motion has been critical to our survival
and success as a species. Kinematics is a
topic under Dynamics that describes motion
without regard to its causes. In this
experiment, kinematics focuses in one
dimension: a motion along a straight line.
This kind of motion, actually any kind of
motion, involves velocity, displacement, and
acceleration with regards to time. The
objectives of the experiment are to draw the
displacement versus time graphs and
velocity versus time graphs for uniform

motion and uniformly accelerated motion,
and to determine one’s normal reaction time
and his reaction time while being distracted.

2. Theory

Kinematics is a branch of mechanics
which deals with the idea necessary to
define an event or motion regardless of the
cause. The moving object is the center of the
experiment noting the details of the action
using velocity and acceleration. There are
formulas relevant and essential in the
experiment of kinematics of human motion:
�= √2ℎ�

t = time h = distance in meter stick
g = 9.8m/s2

Average velocity = ∆�∆�

Instantaneous velocity = ∆�lim�→0∆�∆�

Where

∆x = change in distance

∆t = change in time

3. Methodology

The instrument that was used to
determine the graphs for uniform motion

Page 2

Experiment 2: Errors, Uncertainties, and Measurements
Laboratory Report

Praiseus Acao, Aime Rose Alberto, Aldrin Agawin, Samuelle John Aquino

Department of Math and Physics
College of Science, University of Santo Tomas

España, Manila Philippines

and the uniform accelerated motion in the first
activity (Graphical Analysis of Human motion.)
The outcomes were predicted through sketching
the displacement versus time graph and velocity
versus time graph in different conditions. With
the use of the Logger Pro (Figure.1) a graph of
motions was produced with variable conditions.

Figure.1 The logger pro sensor used in the first and
second activity

On the second activity titled Graph
matching we were presented with two graphs in
the computer screen we were to mimic the
graphs by accomplishing certain kinds of
motions. The devise used to sense the different
motions was also the Logger Pro.

The third activity, Graphical analysis of
motion, required one of our group mates to
walk in a straight line for 10 seconds starting
form rest. The distance travelled every second
was measured and used in computing the
instantaneous velocity and average velocity.
The results were then plotted.

Figure.2 A meter stick that was used to measure the
reaction time in the fourth activity

The fourth activity, was a test the
reaction time of each of the members, each
were supposed to catch a meter stick (Figure.2)
suspended by another person with their thumb
and index finger starting at the 50 cm mark,
while the other person drops the meter stick
without warning. The same procedure was
performed but this time, while being distracted,
by talking to the other person.

4. Results and discussion

For activity 1, graphical analysis of
human motion, the experimenters were first
asked to predict and sketch (Figure.3), and
produce, using the Vernier Logger Pro program,
(Figure.4) the appearance of the displacement
vs. time and the velocity vs. time graph for a
person moving away with constant velocity
from a chosen starting point for a period of 10
seconds.

Page 5

Experiment 2: Errors, Uncertainties, and Measurements
Laboratory Report

Praiseus Acao, Aime Rose Alberto, Aldrin Agawin, Samuelle John Aquino

Department of Math and Physics
College of Science, University of Santo Tomas

España, Manila Philippines

For the first graph, the following was
shown along with the experimenter’s attempt at
reproducing it.

Figure.9: Given Displacement vs. Time graph to be
reproduced (black line) with attempted reproduction
(red line)

To reproduce this, the person did not
move from his position for approximately 1
second. This, in turn, gave a consistent zero
displacement. Then, he had to move away from
the origin for approximately 2 seconds (3-
second mark) and had to stop, once again for
approximately 3 seconds (6-second mark). This
produced the positive movement in the
displacement as the person moved away from
the origin, then since he stopped moving again
a line with the same displacement was
produced. After, he had to move closer to the
origin for approximately 1.5 seconds (7.5-
second mark) and lastly, he had to stop for
approximately 5 seconds (10-second mark),
producing a line moving negatively as he was
walking towards the origin and another line
with the same displacement as he stopped
moving, respectively.

For the second graph, the following was
shown with the experimenter’s attempt.

Figure.10: Given Velocity vs. Time graph to be
reproduced (black line) with attempted reproduction
(red line)

To reproduce this, the experimenter had
to stay still for approximately two seconds. This
produces a line with zero velocity as there was
zero speed. Then, he had to move consistently
away from the origin for approximately 3
seconds (5-second mark). This produced an
elevation in the velocity which turns into a
plateau since the person consistently moves in
that speed. He had to stay still for
approximately 2 seconds (7-second mark),
producing the depression at the velocity since
there was, again, zero speed. Finally, he had to
move towards the origin at a constant speed for
the last 3 seconds (10-second mark) producing
the negative line as he was moving towards the
origin, and another plateau since he was
moving constantly at that speed and direction.

Total Ave. Inst.

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