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TitleExemplary K-12 Superintendents and the Behaviors They Use to Create Personal and
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                            Brandman University
Brandman Digital Repository
	Spring 3-30-2017
Exemplary K-12 Superintendents and the Behaviors They Use to Create Personal and Organizational Meaning
	Frances E. Hansell
		Recommended Citation
Microsoft Word - Fran Hansell 5-5-17
                        
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Brandman University
Brandman Digital Repository

Dissertations

Spring 3-30-2017

Exemplary K-12 Superintendents and the
Behaviors They Use to Create Personal and
Organizational Meaning
Frances E. Hansell
Brandman University, [email protected]

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Hansell, Frances E., "Exemplary K-12 Superintendents and the Behaviors They Use to Create Personal and Organizational Meaning"
(2017). Dissertations. 116.
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Exemplary K-12 Superintendents and the Behaviors They Use to Create Personal and

Organizational Meaning

A Dissertation by

Frances E. Hansell



Brandman University

Irvine, California

School of Education

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

Doctor of Education in Organizational Leadership

March 2017



Committee in charge:

Cindy Petersen, Ed.D., Chair

Keith Larick, Ed.D., Committee Member

Jim Cox, Ph.D., Committee Member

Page 116

100

Research Questions

1. What are the behaviors that exemplary K-12 superintendents use to create personal

and organizational meaning for themselves and their followers through character,

vision, relationships, wisdom, and inspiration?

2. To what degree do followers perceive the behaviors related to character, vision,

relationships, wisdom, and inspiration help to create personal and organizational

meaning?

Research Methods and Data Collection Procedures

The research method used in this thematic study was a mixed-methods case study

that utilized personal interviews via scripted questions with K-12 superintendents in

Northern California and online surveys with followers in the organizations. The primary

data collection was anecdotal data from scripted interview questions. Three separate

interviews with active sitting superintendents were conducted. The interviews were

recorded with a digital recording device and the recordings were transcribed and coded.

The secondary data collection method was online surveys from SurveyMonkey with

administrator-level followers in the organizations. Surveys were gathered via e-mail and

protected with a password-protected account.

Interview Data Collection

Interviews were conducted in a face-to-face setting, and the researcher asked a

series of scripted, open-ended questions. Before the interviews began, the informed

consent form (see Appendix D: Consent Form) was read and signed, and the research

participant’s bill of rights (see Appendix G: Bill of Rights) was read, discussed, and

provided to each participant. Participants were also provided the audio-recording release

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form to be signed (see Appendix H: Audio Release Form). The qualitative data consisted

of audio-recorded, transcribed, anecdotal interviews from scripted interview questions

with three exemplary K-12 superintendents based on the research questions in the study

(see Appendix F: Interview Questions). For this study, scripted questions were open

ended and follow-up probing questions were given to elicit further details pertinent to the

five domains being investigated. Interviews were recorded using digital devices and

notes taken by the researcher. Statements were transcribed and coded for emergent

themes. Patton (2015) stated that the purpose of each interview is to “record as fully and

fairly as possible that particular interviewee’s perspective” (p. 471). Interviews were

transcribed using the following steps: (a) interviews were transcribed, (b) data were

coded, and (c) codes were scanned for themes.

Survey Data Collection

Surveys were conducted using SurveyMonkey (http://www.surveymonkey.com),

an electronic survey with multiple questions, to gather responses from 36 followers about

their perceptions of how exemplary leaders used the five domains to create meaning in

their organizations. Thirty-four followers responded; survey results were collected from

followers and revealed how they perceived exemplary leaders used the five domains to

create meaning. An introduction was given to the followers to support their

understanding that the success of any organization may depend in large part on the

quality of interactions among the leader, team members, and associates. What

determines the quality of these interactions is tied closely to the perception that these

people have of the leader’s behaviors in five areas: character of the leader, vision for the

organization, relationships between the leader and team members, wisdom of the leader,

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LEADERSHIP BEHAVIORS 1 2 3 4 5 6
1. Continuously promotes our team’s moving together as one unit to serve

a common purpose. (relationships)


2. Creates an environment of trust among leaders and team members in
the organization. (relationships)



3. Behaves in a way that shows she/he cares about the team members.
(relationships)



4. Communicates in a clear, meaningful way. (relationships)
5. Encourages team members to share leadership when performing tasks.

(relationships)


6. Behaves in an ethical manner when dealing with others. (character)
7. Actively listens when communicating with others. (character)
8. Responds to challenging situations with optimism. (character)
9. Actions with others shows that he/she can be trusted. (character)

10. Actions show concern for the well-being of others. (character)
11. Works with team members in a way that generates enthusiasm within

teams. (inspiration)


12. Recognizes and honors achievements of teams and team members.
(inspiration)



13. Encourages team members to innovate in order to advance the
organization’s leading edge. (inspiration)



14. Engages in activities that build confidence among team members.
(inspiration)



15. Empowers team members to take reasonable risks when problem
solving. (inspiration)



16. Demonstrates thinking toward the future through conversations and
actions. (vision)



17. Communicates the organization’s vision in a way in team members
enthusiastically. (vision)



18. Engages team members in creating a vision for the future. (vision)
19. Behavior reflects organizational vision when making decisions.

(vision)


20. Promotes innovation that aligns with the organization’s vision. (vision)
21. Elevates the quality of decision making by discussing similarities of

past situations with team members. (wisdom)


22. Demonstrates compassion with team members. (wisdom)
23. Behavior reflects an understanding of life’s complexities. (wisdom)
24. Integrates personal values with organizational values in decision

making. (wisdom)


25. Brings personal knowledge to the table when responding to complex
situations within the organization. (wisdom)



26. Considers past experiences when responding to complex situations
within the organization. (wisdom)



27. Displays expertise when working in a variety of situations within the
organization. (wisdom)



28. Shows concern for others in a variety of organizational settings.
(wisdom)



29. When working with teams and team members, continuously keeps the
overall goals of the organization as part of conversations. (wisdom)



30. Takes action by doing the “right thing” in a variety of organizational
settings. (wisdom)

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217

Part 2 Directions: Please supply the following information. The information will be
used only to assist in understanding the results of this inquiry.
Enter the code provided to you by the person who asked you to complete this survey.

____________________________________________________________________

1. Your gender: ⃝ Female ⃝ Male


2. Your age category: ⃝ 20-30 ⃝ 31-40 ⃝ 41-50 ⃝ 51-60 ⃝ 61 or over


3. Your time with the organization: ⃝ 0- 5 yrs. ⃝ 6-10 yrs. ⃝ 11-20 yrs. ⃝ 21
years or over.



4. Your time with the current leader: ⃝ 0-2 yrs. ⃝ 3-5 yrs. ⃝ 6-10 yrs. ⃝ 11
yrs. or over.



Thank you for your time. It is very much appreciated

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