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Page 1

Evidence-Based
Practices for

Children, Youth,
and Young Adults

with
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Connie Wong, Samuel L. Odom,

Kara Hume, Ann W. Cox, Angel Fettig,

Suzanne Kucharczyk, Matthew E. Brock,

Joshua B. Plavnick, Veronica P. Fleury, and Tia R. Schultz

Autism Evidence-Based Practice Review Group
Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Page 2

B Wong, Odom, Hume, Cox, Fettig, Kucharczyk, Brock, Plavnick, Fleury & Schultz

Evidence-Based Practices for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with
Autism Spectrum Disorder
© 2014 by Samuel L. Odom

Graphic design: Gina Harrison, FPG Publications Office

Suggested citation: Wong, C., Odom, S. L., Hume, K. Cox, A. W., Fettig, A., Kucharczyk,
S., … Schultz, T. R. (2014). Evidence-based practices for children, youth, and young ddults
with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina, Frank
Porter Graham Child Development Institute, Autism Evidence-Based Practice Review
Group.

This report is available online at
http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/sites/autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/files/2014-EBP-Report.pdf

Project support was provided by the United States Department of Education, the
Office of Special Education Programs (Project No. H325G070004, National Professional
Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders) and the Institute of Education
Science (Project No. R324B090005, Post-doctoral Training Program on Special Educa-
tion Research). Findings and conclusions of this report are those of the authors and do
not necessarily reflect the policies of either of these funding sources.

FPG Child Development Institute at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is
one of the nation’s oldest multidisciplinary centers devoted to the study of children
and families. Our mission is to cultivate and share knowledge that enhances child
development and family well being.

Advancing knowledge. Enhancing lives.

http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/content/ebp-update

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Evidence-Based Practices for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder 51

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Rispoli, M., O’Reilly, M., Lang, R., Machalicek, W., Davis, T., Lancioni, G., & Sigafoos, J. (2011). Effects of
motivating operations on problem and academic behavior in classrooms. Journal of Applied Behavior
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Roane, H. S., Kelly, M. L., & Fisher, W. W. (2003). The effects of noncontingent access to food on the rate of
object mouthing across three settings. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36(4), 579-582.
doi: 10.1901/jaba.2003.36-579

Rosales, R., Worsdell, A., & Trahan, M. (2010). Comparison of methods for varying item presentation dur-
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Sigafoos, J., Green, V. A., Payne, D., O’Reilly, M. F., & Lancioni, G. E. (2009). A classroom-based antecedent
intervention reduces obsessive-repetitive behavior in an adolescent with autism. Clinical Case Studies,
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Anticedent BAsed intervention FAct sheet—suggested citAtion
Hume, K. (2013). Antecedent-based intervention (ABI) fact sheet. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina, Frank

Porter Graham Child Development Institute, The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum
Disorders.

Adapted from:
Neitzel, J. (2009). Overview of antecedent-based interventions. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina, Frank

Porter Graham Child Development Institute, The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum
Disorders.

10.1002/bin
10.1901/jaba
10.1901/jaba
10.2511/rpsd
10.1901/jaba
10.1901/jaba
10.1016/j.rasd
10.1016/j.ridd
10.1016/j.ridd
10.1901/jaba

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52 Wong, Odom, Hume, Cox, Fettig, Kucharczyk, Brock, Plavnick, Fleury & Schultz

Cognitive Behavioral Intervention
Fact Sheet

Brief Description

Cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI) is based on the belief that behavior is mediated by cogni-

tive processes. Learners are taught to examine their own thoughts and emotions, recognize when

negative thoughts and emotions are escalating in intensity, and then use strategies to change their

thinking and behavior. These interventions tend to be used with learners who display problem

behavior related to specific emotions or feelings, such as anger or anxiety. Cognitive behavioral

interventions are often used in conjunction with other evidence-based practices including social

narratives, reinforcement, and parent-implemented intervention.

Qualifying Evidence

CBI meets evidence-based criteria with 3 group design and 1 single case design studies.

Ages

According to the evidence-based studies, this intervention has been effective for elementary

school-age learners (6-11 years) to high school-age learners (15-18 years) with ASD.

Outcomes

CBI can be used effectively to address social, communication, behavior, cognitive, adaptive, and

mental health outcomes.

Research Studies Providing Evidence
Drahota, A., Wood, J. J., Sze, K. M., & Van Dyke, M. (2011). Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on daily

living skills in children with high-functioning autism and concurrent anxiety disorders. Journal of

Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41(3), 257-265. doi: 10.1007/s10803-010-1037-4

Singh, N. N., Lancioni, G. E., Manikam, R., Winton, A. S., Singh, A. N., Singh, J., & Singh, A. D. (2011). A

mindfulness-based strategy for self-management of aggressive behavior in adolescents with autism.

Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 5(3), 1153-1158. doi:10.1016/j.rasd.2010.12.012

Sofronoff, K., Attwood, T., & Hinton, S. (2005). A randomised controlled trial of a CBT intervention for

anxiety in children with Asperger syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46(11), 1152-

1160. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2005.00411.x

Sofronoff, K., Attwood, T., Hinton, S., & Levin, I. (2007). A randomized controlled trial of a cognitive behav-

ioural intervention for anger management in children diagnosed with Asperger syndrome. Journal of

Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(7), 1203-1214. doi: 10.1007/s10803-006-0262-3

cognitive BehAviorAl intervention FAct sheet—suggested citAtion
Brock, M. E. (2013). Cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI) fact sheet. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina,

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, The National Professional Development Center on Autism
Spectrum Disorders.

10.1016/j.rasd

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