Download Electrical Safety in Ontario - 2006 Report PDF

TitleElectrical Safety in Ontario - 2006 Report
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages55
Document Text Contents
Page 1

2006
Ontario Electrical
Safety Report

Page 2

This document was prepared by the Engineering and Regulatory

Division of The Electrical Safety Authority. For queries and

additional information, please contact Francis Hardy at

[email protected]

Page 27

2�

ESA Electrical Safety Report 2006

Figure 23
Occupational and Non-Occupational Injuries by Age Group – Ontario only 1998 to 2004

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

<1
ye

ar
1-4

ye
ars

5-9
ye

ars
10

-14
ye

ars

20
-24

ye
ars

25
-29

ye
ars

30
-34

ye
ars

35
-39

ye
ars

40
-44

ye
ars

45
-49

ye
ars

50
-54

ye
ars

55
-59

ye
ars

60
-64

ye
ars

65
-69

ye
ars

70
-74

ye
ars

75
-79

ye
ars

80
-84

ye
ars

90
ye

ars
an

d u
p

15
-19

ye
ars

Table 21
Electrical Injuries by Gender in

Ontario (CIHI data) 1998 to 2004

Figure 24
Electrical Injuries by Gender in Ontario (CIHI data) 1998 to 2004

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

120

100

80

60

40

20

0

n Female n Male

Nu
m

be
r o

f i
nj

ur
ie

s

Female Male
1998 11 96
1999 15 100
2000 7 82
2001 10 71
2002 9 55
2003 10 58
2004 9 48
Total 71 510

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2�

2006 ESA Electrical Safety Report

Summary of Non-Occupational Fatalities and CIHI Data

n The number of non-occupational electrocutions continues to decline.
n In Ontario the working age group (ages 20 to 54) have the greatest incident of electrical injuries.
n From the five non-occupational fatalities in 2006, four occurred in residential facilities, two were powerline-related, and other two were

related to wiring installation.
n Non-occupational electrocutions in residential facilities continue to outnumber the other facilities.
n Male outnumbered female injuries at least by a 5:1 ratio each year; this is true for both occupational and non-occupational.

Powerline-related electrocutions accounted for 54 of the 102 electrocutions in the period from 1998 to 2006 – 53% of all electrocutions. Of
these, 34 were occupational in nature and 30 non-occupational. The year-to-year numbers of powerline-related electrocutions are presented in
Figure 25. To compare, Figure 20 showed how non-occupational fatalities had steadily declined in the last nine years.

Figures 26 and 27 clearly show how electrocutions with overhead powerlines play a major part in the overall electrocution statistics. The decline
of electrocutions in the nine-year period was largely due to a decrease in powerline contact (Figure 26), especially in the non-occupational
sector. In the first four years of this period, powerline deaths accounted for roughly 60% of all electrocutions; in the last four years, they
accounted for less than 50% of the overall electrocution count. Figure 28 further demonstrates the reduction of powerline fatalities in the non-
occupational sector. Figure 28 shows that with the exception of 2005, powerline fatalities in the non-occupational sector in the last four years
did not exceed 10% of the total electrocution count in Ontario. However, since 2004, where prevalence of powerline electrocution was at an all
time low (25%); powerline incidents have crept up again in 2005 and 2006 to 42%.

3.0. Powerline Statistics

Figure 25
Powerline Electrocutions – Occupational versus Non-Occupational 1998 to 2006

n Non-Occupational n Occupational
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

Nu
m

be
r o

f d
ea

th
s

Ñ
In the first four years of this period, powerline deaths accounted for
roughly 60% of all electrocutions. In the last four years, they accounted
for less than 50% of the overall electrocution count.

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2006 ESA Electrical Safety Report

5.2. Future Initiatives

Preventing electrical fires caused by cooktop stoves
Through its participation in the Ontario Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council, The OFM, with the help of all fire departments in Ontario
conducted the “Stove Top Fire Survey” with successful results. The Stove Top Subcommittee, at the time of writing is currently mapping strategies
on how best to increase the profile of this problem with the stove top manufacturers and the insurance industry.

Preventing Accidents with Incorrect Use of Multimeters
ESA will continue to seek support from stakeholders on the use of fused leads with multimeters in the workplace in the Province of Ontario.
With the development of the CSA Z462, the Standard for Workplace Electrical Safety, the equivalent of National Fire Prevention Association
(NFPA) 70E, the Standard for Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplace, ESA will continue to attempt to influence the CSA
Committee to require the use of fused leads with multimeters in the workplace.

Engaging stakeholders to identify areas of highest risk
With the recommendation from the safety management workshop projects conducted in 2006 of the need to improve ESA data and
investigation to identify root cause of fatalities, injuries and fires, ESA is planning to a) improve its data collection capabilities by developing
improved criteria of required information and interaction with other agencies (TSSA, MOL, WSIB), and b) improving its investigation
capabilities to identify trending and root cause by developing a specialized team to investigate serious incidents and reporting.

Partnership with the OFM
The OFM had allowed ESA to examine OFM investigated fires in its office in Midhurst, Ontario to better understand electrical fires. ESA
and OFM are working towards a new memorandum of understanding that would allow better cooperation between the two organizations.

Partnership with the MOL
With greater cooperation between the MOL and ESA, the two organization are continuing to work on further improving relationship with
each other.

5.3. Recommendations and Future Strategies

At the time of writing, ESA is still crafting its long-term plan of reducing electrical injuries and electrical fires. Items under consideration are:

n Increase workplace safety with the electrical trade

n Create a strategy that would significantly reduce powerline incidents

n Seek initiative that would reduce fires in buildings older than 30 years.

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ESA Electrical Safety Report 2006

Accident – An undesired or unplanned event, resulting in property damage, injury or fatality.

Aerial Work Platform (AWP) – a self-propelled work platform device, capable of lowering and lifting its work platform by mechanical means.

AFI – Application for Inspection, an application for performing electrical installation that requires inspection, as defined by the Ontario
Electrical Safety Code.

CIHI – Canadian Institute of Health Information, a subsidiary of Health Canada, a not-for-profit organization responsible for collecting all
health information across Canada.

Cost of Injury – Cost of injury as calculated by the WSIB in compensation, medical aid and pension.

CSAO – Construction Safety Association of Ontario, an accident prevention advisory organization, funded by the WSIB, serving the
construction sector.

ECAO – The Electrical Contractors Association of Ontario – a contractor association for unionized electrical contractors.

Electrician – A worker whose occupation is identified as working primarily with electricity.

Electrocution – An accidental death, caused by contact with electricity.

Fatality – an injury resulting in a death.

Human error – An inappropriate or undesired human decision or behaviour that reduces or has the potential to reduce the safety or system
performance.

IAPA – Industrial Accident Prevention Association – one of the Safe Work Agencies, responsible for monitoring safety performances of
industrial companies in Ontario.

LDC – Local Distribution Company.

LTI – Lost Time Injury, a term defined by the WSIB for an occupational injury that resulted in a worker missing more than one shift of work.

MOL – Ministry of Labour of Ontario.

Non-Occupational injuries – Injuries occurring other than in the workplace.

NWISP – National Work Injury Statistics Program, an organization that serves as a repository of all occupational injuries in Canada.

Occupational Injury – an injury occurring in a workplace.

OEL – Ontario Electrical League – a contractor-based association of non-unionized electrical contractors.

OFM – The Office of Fire Marshal, a provincial organization responsible for the prevention of fires in Ontario.

Powerline – Outside/outdoor electrical cable or wire, used to distribute electrical energy.

RBD – Radial Boom Derrick

Traumatic Injury – Injury as a result of a sudden or violent act.

WSIB – Workplace Safety Insurance Board, an organization responsible for compensation of workplace injuries.

Glossary

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