Download Eating in Crisis: Culturally Appropriate Food and the Local Food Movement in the Lives of ... PDF

TitleEating in Crisis: Culturally Appropriate Food and the Local Food Movement in the Lives of ...
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size516.0 KB
Total Pages93
Table of Contents
                            University of Vermont
ScholarWorks @ UVM
Eating in Crisis: Culturally Appropriate Food and the Local Food Movement in the Lives of Domestic Violence Survivors
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

University of Vermont
ScholarWorks @ UVM

UVM Honors College Senior Theses Undergraduate Theses

2014

Eating in Crisis: Culturally Appropriate Food and
the Local Food Movement in the Lives of
Domestic Violence Survivors
Rachel A. Aronson
[email protected]

Follow this and additional works at: http://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses

This Honors College Thesis is brought to you for free and open access by the Undergraduate Theses at ScholarWorks @ UVM. It has been accepted for
inclusion in UVM Honors College Senior Theses by an authorized administrator of ScholarWorks @ UVM. For more information, please contact
[email protected]

Recommended Citation
Aronson, Rachel A., "Eating in Crisis: Culturally Appropriate Food and the Local Food Movement in the Lives of Domestic Violence
Survivors" (2014). ������
��������
��
����� � �� Paper 21.

Page 46

45



Margaret is the TLP coordinator. During summer 2013, she had worked with TLP for about six months.

She is not a counselor or social worker; her position entails managing clients’ physical needs, such as

providing them with transportation to doctor’s appointments and picking up clothing donations. She

also regularly works one- on- one with her clients to help them set and achieve goals. Foremost among

these goals are budgeting and financial independence. Her job also involves a lot of paperwork and

improvisation.

Carly is New Hope’s housing coordinator and community advocate. Her job involves working with clients

to navigate the federal and state benefits system, especially as it applies to housing assistance. As a

community advocate, she works one- on- one with clients to help them find safety and comfort. Before

working at New Hope, Carly spent several years working at a domestic violence shelter on a Native

American reservation in South Dakota. At the end of August 2013, Carly left New Hope to move back to

South Dakota.

Jane is the director of both New Hope shelters. She began working at New Hope in May 2013 so was

very new to the position. Before working at New Hope, she had worked at a food pantry in Connecticut.

She is very enthusiastic about food and focused on bringing healthier food into New Hope’s shelters.

New Hope Clients

Camila is a twenty-year-old woman living in a TLP apartment with her one-year-old daughter. She grew

up in Western Massachusetts with a large, extended family. After leaving her abusive boyfriend, her

father’s daughter, she had to move several hours away from her family. Camila moved into TLP in July

2013, halfway through my fieldwork. She spoke about returning to college and getting an advanced

degree.

Similer Documents