Download Eastern Michigan University Undergraduate Catalog, 1967 PDF

TitleEastern Michigan University Undergraduate Catalog, 1967
LanguageEnglish
File Size14.9 MB
Total Pages270
Document Text Contents
Page 1

112th Annual Edition

The Undergraduate Catalog

EASTERN MICHIGAN

UNIVERSITY

Ypsilanti, Michigan

Accredited by
The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education

Announcements for 1967 -68

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY BULLETIN

VOLUME LVII MAY, 1967 NUMBER 3

Published four times each year by Eastern Michigan Univer­
sity. Entered as second class matter at the U.S. Post Office at
Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Page 2

2

EASTER MICHIGAN

UNIVERSITY
Ypsilanti, Michigan

GOVERNMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY

The 1963 Constitution of the State of Michigan
places Eastern Michigan University under a separate
board consisting of eight members appointed by the
Governor. It is known as the Board of Regents of
Eastern Michigan Universiy. Financial support for the
University comes from tax monies paid by the people
of Michigan and receipt of student tuition and fees.

THE BOARD OF REGENTS

Edward J. McCormick,
Chairman and Presiding Officer

Virginia Allan
Charles Anspach
0. William Habel
Lawrence R. Husse
J. Don Lawrence
Dr. Martin P. O'Hara
Mildred Beatty Smith

Residence

Monroe

Wyandotte
Mt. Pleasant

Ann Arbor
Ypsilanti
Ypsilanti
Ypsilanti

Flint

Page 135

136 I Undergraduate Catalog

the hour from four to five o'clock for conferences at
least two days per week.

9. Students are expected to take work on campus prior to
student teaching. Students applying for student teach­
ing, who have had no work on campus, will be required
to submit a record showing satisfactory completion of
an approved program leading to student teaching. Rec­
ommendations from suitable officials at the applicant's
former institution and/ or from employers must be re­
ceived at Eastern Michigan University prior to Septem­
ber 1 for fall semester, and January 1 for spring se­
mester student teaching.

I 0. During the time that the student is doing his teaching,
he should so arrange his daily schedule that his teaching
will take precedence over other interests and duties.

11. Three types of conferences are designed for the as­
sistance of student teachers. The student is expected to
attend Student Teacher Assemblies as called. He is ex­
pected to have group conferences with his supervising
teacher once each week. These are held from four
to five o'clock on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons
unless otherwise scheduled by the supervising teacher.
Individual conferences are held with supervising teach­
ers and with the principals, or director, as needs or de­
sires of student teachers demand.

Application for student teaching may be obtained from
the Student Teaching Office, 113 Sherzer Hall. Applications
should be completed and returned to the Student Teaching
Office prior to the appropriate deadline date of February 15th
for placement in the following Fall semester and April 15th
for the Spring semester. Applications for student teaching in
the Summer session are to be completed and returned by the
previous March 15th. Assignments are made one week prior
to advance registration of students for the subsequent se­
mester.

Coordinating Council on Professional Education

Continuous integration of the teacher education program
is the objective of the Coordinating Council on Professional
Education, which is composed of representatives of the
College of Education, a representative of the Division of
Field Services, and a representative from the Division of
Student Affairs. The Council recommends requirements for
admission to professional course work, passes upon applica­
tions for student teaching, advises on relevant matters con­
cerned with the operation of the teacher education program,
and plans the further development of the program.

CURRICULA FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS

Early Elementary Curriculum

Bachelor of Science Degree

State Elementary Provisional Certificate
Kindergarten, Grades 1, 2, and 3

Adviser Chairman, Robert Fisher
Semester Hours

Group I Drama, Language, Literature, and
Speech

121, 122 English Composition and
121 Fund. of Speech

One of the following
I O I , 102 Reading of Literature or
A one-year sequence in a foreign language or
Three courses leading to a minor in Modern
Language for Elementary Grades (see page
141)

207 Literature for Elementary Grades
Group II Science

I O I Functional Mathematics
20 I Psychology
Any two of the following

I 08 Earth Science 4
l 05 Biological Science 4
111 Physical Science 5
119 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4

Group Ill Social Science
112 American Government
Either of the following

101, 102 History of Civilization or
I 05 Structure of American Society and
123 Evolution of American Democracy

Either of the following
200 Types of Philosophy or
291 Great Religions of the World

Group IV Education
310 The Teaching of Reading
320 Human Growth and Development
326 School and Society
344 Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching .
381 Teaching of Mathematics K-6
402 Science for Elementary Grades
418 Seminar in Education
492 Student Teaching

8
6-10

3

17-2!

14-15
3
3

8- 9

3
6

3

3
4
6
2
3
3
2
8

12

31

Page 136

(Curriculum Continued)

Semester Hours

Group V Fine Arts
!01, 300 Art
104, 320 Music

Group VI Practical Arts
253, 354 Industrial Arts for Elementary

Grades
Men: 100 Military Science (see page 29)

Group VII Physical Education and Health
320 Health Education in Elementary Grades
Physical Education Activity Courses

11
6
5

5- 6

5
I

6- 5
2

(12 act. hrs.) 3- 4
Men: May apply 2 semester hours of Military

Science toward this requirement
M25 or M26 or swim test required.

Women: Must include WOl, W07, and W09
Additional Required Work

241 Introduction to Speech Correction
Electives
Total

2
2

26-21
124

Students who have credit for 303 Principles of Teaching,
340 Evaluation of Pupils, or 315 Early Elementary Curricu­
lum should continue to satisfy those requirements. Prior to
student teaching, 303 Principles of Teaching and two methods
courses must be completed.

In addition to the above requirements, students must com­
plete one of the following options:

l . A major subject of at least 24 semester hours and two
minor subjects of 15 semester hours each;

2. A major subject of at least 30 semester hours and one
minor subject of 20 semester hours;

3. Four minor subjects of 15 semester hours each;
4. Three minor subjects of 20 semester hours each.
The equivalent of at least two minors must be in subjects

taught in the elementary school.
The group majors and minors listed on page 140 to 142

are acceptable on the Early Elementary Curriculum.
The courses listed in Groups V and VI on the above cur­

riculum, with the exception of military science, constitute an
automatic Arts Group Minor of 16 semester hours.

Specific curricular patterns by semester are provided
for each student by the College of Education upon enrollment.
Students are assigned to a faculty adviser who assists them
in planning all programs of classes. The normal academic
load per semester is 15 to 16 semester hours, until student

Elementary Curricula J 137

(Curriculum Continued)

teaching is undertaken in the senior year. Activity hours to
satisfy physical education requirements are taken in addition
to the normal academic load of 15 to 16 semester hours.

The following pattern of subjects by year is suggested in
meeting the requirements of the Early Elementary Curriculum:

First Year*

121, 122 English Composition and
121 Fundamentals of Speech

Foreign Language (page 141)
101, I 02 Reading of Literature

10 I , l 02 History of Civilization or
105 Structure of American Society and
123 Evolution of American Democracy

l 01 Functional Mathematics
101 Introduction to Art
104 Elements of Music
112 American Government
Non-Veteran Men: l 00 Military Science

and
Physical Education Activity

Semester Hours

8

10-6

6
3
3
2
3
2

Women: WO! and elective in Physical Education
Activity

(3)

(6)
Major, minor, or elective courses

201 Psychology
Two of the following

105 Biological Science
108 Earth Science
111 Physical Science

Second Year

119 Fundamentals of Chemistry
207 Literature for Elementary Grades

200 Types of Philosophy or
291 Great Religions of the World

253 Industrial Arts for Elementary Grades

Semester Hours

3
8-9

3

3
3

* Freshmen students should plan with their advisers a pro­
gram totaling 30-32 semester hours for the first year and defer
other required courses listed here until second and third years.

Page 269

270 I Undergraduate Catalog

ST A TISTICAL INFORMATION

DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES GRANTED 1964-1965

B.Art
A.M. M.S. A.B. B.S. Educ.

July 165 0 21 179

Oct. 70 0 2 52 0

Jan. 116 0 5 1 237 5

June 166 2 112 468 3

TOTAL 5 17 2 186 936 9

Deduct, counted twice

Total number persons graduated

Two-Year Business Technician Certificates (Non-Teaching)

Two-Year Technical Draftsman Certificates (Non-Teaching)

DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES GRANTED 1965-1966

M. Bus
Spec. A.M. M.S. Ad. A.B.

August 1965 228 5 21

October 1965 82 3 8

January 1966 41 147 3 3 5 1

June 1966 12 194 5 3 104

Total 53 651 16 7 184

Deduct, counted twice

Total number persons graduated

B.Bus.
Educ.

4

0

10

16

30

B.S.

189

40

236

420

885

Two-Year Business Technician Certificates (Non-Teaching) .

Two-Year Technical Draftsman Certificates (Non-Teaching)

B.Mus. B.Bus. B.S. in

Provisional
Certificates

Educ. Admin. Bus.Admin. Elem. Sec.

0 10 0 151 78

0 2 0 45 19

6 17 0 144 135

5 39 310 207

11 68 650 439

8

5

Provisional
Certificates

B. Art B. Bus. B. Mus. B. Bus
Educ. Educ. Educ. Admin. Elem. Sec.

6 6 4 16 155 92

51 14

7 I O 5 30 129 140

10 22 10 73 248 226

23 39 19 119 583 472

7

3

Total

609

190

721

1329

2849

945

1904

Total

790

226

839

1375

3220

1045

2175

Page 270

Statistical Information I

PERMANENT CERTIFICATES JULY 1 , 1964-JUNE 30, 1965 PERMANENT CERTIFICATES JULY 1, 1965-JUNE 30, 1966

Elementary Secondary Total Elementary Secondary Total

July 13, 1964 74 45 119 July 1965 43 27 70

September 22, 1964 . 83 48 131 August 1965 44 33 77

October 15, 1964 57 36 93
September 1965 46 29 75

17 29
October 1965 40 35 75

December 1 7, 1964 12 November 1965 16 15 31
January 13, 1965 16 8 24 December 1965 20 15 35

February l 0, 1965 24 14 3 8 January 1966 11 9 20

March 10, 1965 18 11 29 February 1966 20 11 31

April 7 , 1965 21 16 37
March 1966 23 20 43

May 5 , 1965 24 14 38
April 1966 19 15 34

May 1966 19 15 34
June 1, 1965 18 14 32 June 1966 37 33 70

Total 347 223 570 Total 338 257 595

ENROLLMENT

1965-66 1966-67

Residence Enrollment:

Summer Session 4,357 5,551

Regular year:

Fall 10,188 l 2,915

Spring 10,219

Extension Enrollment:

Fall . 2,429 2,179

Spring 2,137


271

i .
-

{-

i

'
I

I.

? '

,,
?•

,;;, iJ v
cJ: b

Similer Documents