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TitleDickens great expectations
TagsEstella (Great Expectations) Great Expectations Pip (South Park)
File Size204.5 KB
Total Pages40
Table of Contents
                            Chapter 1:
Analysis:
Chapter 2:
Analysis:
Chapter 3:
Analysis:
Chapter 4:
Analysis:
Chapter 5:
Analysis:
Chapter 6:
Analysis:
Chapter 7:
Analysis:
Chapter 8:
Analysis:
Chapter 9:
Analysis:
Chapter 10:
Analysis:
Summary and Analysis of Part I, Chapters 11-19 (11-19)
Chapter 11:
Analysis:
Chapter 12:
Analysis:
Chapter 13:
Analysis:
Chapter 14:
Analysis:
Chapter 15:
Analysis:
Chapter 16:
Analysis:
Chapter 17:
Analysis:
Chapter 18:
Analysis:
Chapter 19:
Analysis:
Summary and Analysis of Part II, Chapters 1-10 (20-29)
Part II: Chapter 1:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 2:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 3:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 4:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 5:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 6:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 7:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 8:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 9:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 10:
Analysis:
Summary and Analysis of Part II, Chapters 11-20 (30-39)
Part II: Chapter 11:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 12:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 13:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 14:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 15:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 16:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 17:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 18:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 19:
Analysis:
Part II: Chapter 20:
Analysis:
Summary and Analysis of Part III, Chapters 1-10 (40-49)
Part III: Chapter 1:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 2:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 3:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 4:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 5:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 6:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 7:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 8:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 9:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 10:
Analysis:
Summary and Analysis of Part III, Chapters 11-20 (50-59)
Part III: Chapter 11:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 12:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 13:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 14:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 15:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 16:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 17:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 18:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 19:
Analysis:
Part III: Chapter 20:
Analysis:
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

GREAT EXPECTATIONS

Pip goes home and Herbert takes care of his burns. Herbert has been spending some
time with Magwitch at Clara's and has been told the whole Magwitch story. Magwitch
was the husband of Jaggers' servant woman, the Tigress. The woman had come to
Magwitch on the day she murdered the other woman and told him she was going to
kill their child and that Magwitch would never see her. And Magwitch never did. Pip
puts is all together and tells Herbert that Magwitch is Estella's father.

It is time to escape with Magwitch. Herbert and Pip get up the next morning and
start rowing down the river, picking up Magwitch at the preappointed time. They are
within a few feet of a steamer that they hope to board when another boat pulls
alongside to stop them. In the confusion, Pip sees Compeyson leading the other
boat, but the steamer is on top of them. The steamer crushes Pip's boat, Compeyson
and Magwitch disappear under water, and Pip and Herbert find themselves in a police
boat of sorts. Magwitch finally comes up from the water. He and Compeyson
wrestled for a while, but Magwitch had let him go and he is presumably drowned.
Once again, Magwitch is shackled and arrested.

Magwitch is in jail and quite ill. Pip attends to the ailing Magwitch daily in prison. Pip
whispers to him one day that the daughter he thought was dead is quite alive. "She
is a lady and very beautiful," Pip says. "And I love her." Magwitch gives up the ghost.

Pip falls into a fever for nearly a month. Creditors and Joe fall in and out of his
dreams and his reality. Finally, he regains his senses and sees that, indeed, Joe has
been there the whole time, nursing him back to health. Joe tells him that Miss
Havisham died during his illness, that she left Estella nearly all, and Matthew Pocket
a great deal. Joe slips away one morning leaving only a note. Pip discovers that Joe
has paid off all his debtors.

Pip is committed to returning to Joe, asking for forgiveness for everything he has
done, and to ask Biddy to marry him. Pip goes to Joe and indeed finds happiness --
but the happiness is Joe and Biddy's. It is their wedding day. Pip wishes them well,
truly, and asks them for their forgiveness in all his actions. They happily give it.

Pip goes to work for Herbert's' firm and lives with the now married Clara and
Herbert. Within a year, he becomes a partner. He pays off his debts and works hard.

Eleven years later, Pip returns from his work overseas. He visits Joe and Biddy and
meets their son, a little Pip, sitting by the fire with Joe just like Pip himself did years
ago. Pip tells Biddy that he is quite the settled old bachelor, living with Clara and
Herbert and he thinks he will never marry. Nevertheless, he goes to the Satis House
that night to think once again of the girl who got away. And there he meets Estella.
Drummle treated her roughly and recently died. She tells Pip that she has learned
the feeling of heartbreak the hard way and now seeks his forgiveness for what she
did to him. The two walk out of the garden hand in hand, and Pip "saw the shadow of
no parting from her."

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theatrical productions himself, and there is no doubt he was probably targeting
certain actors that he knew personally in this parody.

Part II: Chapter 13:

Pip receives a note from Estella that she is coming to London. She asks if he will
meet her at the carriage stop.

While waiting for the carriage, Pip meets Wemmick who is on his way to Newgate
prison to conduct some business. The prisoners are friendly with Wemmick, even
offering to send him presents before their executions.

As Pip returns to wait for Estella, he wonders at the fact that things associated with
the criminal element have strangely intercepted his life at various times, starting
with the convict at the beginning of the story. He feels as if the stain of criminality is
still on him from his visit to Newgate prison and how that contrasts with the beautiful
Estella.

As the carriage pulls up, Pip once again sees a familiar expression in Estella's face,
but cannot place it.

Analysis:

Pip reflects on how criminals have intercepted his life at various points, starting with
the convict that he fed at the beginning and the one-eyed convict that gave him the
pound note from the first convict. Now he is involved in men, Wemmick and Jaggers,
who make convicts their livelihood. These thoughts are interrupted by the strangely
abrupt entrance of Estella's carriage. It is strangely abrupt since Pip spent the whole
chapter in anticipation, waiting for nearly six hours for it, but when it finally comes,
Pip is involved in other thoughts.

Narrator Pip is hinting with these thoughts that Young Pip's interaction with criminals
is not over. Their surprising involvement in his life will continue. Dicken's placing the
abrupt intervention of Estella's entrance in these thoughts foreshadows a little more
specifically: Estella, too, will have something to do with criminality.

Part II: Chapter 14:

Estella is to go on to Richmond, accompanied by Pip, and the two sit in a nearby cafe
as they wait for the outgoing coach. Estella is to educated by a wealthy woman in
Richmond with a single daughter.

Estella tells Pip that all of Miss Havisham's relatives hate him because they Miss
Havisham to be his benefactor. They are always gossiping jealously, but Estella
believes that Pip is still alright in Miss Havisham's eyes.

The carriage comes and they ride to Richmond talking of trivial things. Pip believes
that if he were to be with her forever that he would be blissfully happy -- but this
contradicts his knowledge that whenever he is with her he is "always miserable."

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