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TitleDance for Physically Disabled Persons
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.2 MB
Total Pages113
Document Text Contents
Page 1

ED 146 720

AUTHOR
TITLE

INSTITUTION

SPONS AGENCY

MORT NO
PUB DATE
GRANT
NOTE

AVAILABLE FROM

EDRS PRICE
DESCRIPTORS

DOCUMENT RESUME

EC 102 698

Hill, Kathleen
Dance for Physically Disabled Persons: A Manual for
Teaching Ballroom, Square, and Folk Dances to Users
of Wheelchairs and Crutches.
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and
Recreation, Washington, D.C.
Bureau of Education for: the Handicapped (DHEW/OE),
Washington, D.C. Div. cf Innovation and
Development.
447AH50022
Jun 76
G007500556
114p.; For related information, see EC 102 692 - EL
102 697
Physical Education and Recreation for the
Handicapped, Information and Research Utilization
Center (IRUC), 1201 Sixteenth Sreet, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20036 ($7.95)

ME-$0.83 Plus Postage. HC Not Available from EDRS.
Adapted Physical Education; *Dance; Physical
Acti-rities; *Physically Handicapped; Psychological
Needs; Recreation; Rehabilit_tion; *Teaching Methods;
Wheel Chairs

ABSTRACT .
The final booklet in a series on physical education

and sports for the handicapped presents ideas for teaching dance to
the physically disabled. Introductory sections consider the
rehabilitation role of dance, physiological and psychological
benefits, and facilities for dance instruction. Step-by-step
suggestions are given for teaching ballroom dance (waltz, foxtrot,
merengue, cha-cha, rhumta, and tango), square dance, and folk dance
to persons using wheelchairs and crutches. Also included are reprints
of seven articles on dance :and a listing of additional resources on
dance. (CL)

***********************************************************************
* Documents acquired by ERIC include many irformal unpublished *
* materials not available from other sources. ERIC makes every effort *
* to obtain the best copy available. Nevertheless, items of marginal *
* reproducibility are often encountered and this affects the quality *
* of the microfiche and hardccpy reproductions ERIC makes available *
* via the ERIC Document Reproduction Service (EDRS). EARS is not *
* responsible for th- quality of the original document. Reproductions *
* supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made from the original. *
***********************************************************************

Page 2

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U S DE.ARTMENT OF HEALTH
EDuCAriok WELPARE
NATIONAL INSTITUTE DF

EDUCATION

c:a MEN' HAS BEEN REPRO-
kf-D f A; RECEIVED FROM

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DANCE FOR PHYSICALLY DISABLED PERSONS:

A Manual for Teaching Ballroom, Square, and Folk Dance', to
Users of Wheelchairs and Crutches

Pm-rizty,i

by

Kathleen Hill
Therapeutic Recreation Specialist

The Rehabilitation Hospital of the Pacific
Honolulu, Hawaii

Physical Education and Recreation for the Handicapped:
Information and Research Utilization Center (IRUC)
1201 Sixtesmth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036

Soons,:n Lj American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and
Recreat'on

A Fr,7),;, Bureau of Education for the Handicapped, Division of
Innovation and Development, U.S. Office of Education,
Department of Health, Education and Welfare

Page 56

F

F

Turn L 45°

Turn R 450

F

Turn R 45°

0
Turn L 45

Tan o--Basic Wheelchairs)

Starting Position

Man Woman

x ----> --tea - .>
144

_ __.

V+
(face each other)

4-, r

......,...÷

1
-... wows

......),

11---,-----,----4
.,----i,---).

(face each other)

49

B

B

Turn R 45°

Turn L 450

B

B

Turn L 45
0

0
Turl R 45

Page 57

(Counts)

PARALLEL (see diagram, pages 51-52)

CONVERSATION

Slow

Slow
Tango
Close
Slow
Slow
Tango
Close

Slow
Slow
Tango

Close
Slow
Slow

Tango

Close

Slow
Slow
Tango-close

Slow
Slew
Tango-close

Slow
Slow
Tango
Close
Slow
Slow
Tango
Clone

(Man)

Turn L 45° and F
F

Turn R 45°

Turn L 45°
B

B

Turn R 90°
Turn L 45°

(Woman)

Turn L 43° and F

F
Turn R 45°
Turn'L 45°

B

B

Turn R 90°
Turn L 45°

face each ()dirt/.

Turn R 45° and F Turn R 45° and F
F F

Turn L 45° Turn L 45°
Turn R 45° Turn R 45°

B B

B B

Turn L 90° Turn L 90°
Turn R 45° Turn R 45°

face each other

Turn L 90° Turn R 90°-
F F

Turn L 180° Turn R 180°
about face

B B

B B

Turn R 270° Turn L 270°
face each other

F

B

Turn L 45'
Turn R 45°

B

F

Turn R 45°
Turn L 43°

50

J'.:t.)

B

F

Turn R 45°
Turn L 45°

F

B

Tarn L 45°
Tura. R 45'

face each other

Page 112

23. Paley, A. M. "Dance Therapy: An Overview." American Journal of
Psychoanalysis 34:81-83; 1974.

24. Roberts, A. G. "Dance Movement Therapy: Adjunctive Treatment in
Psychotherapy." Canada's Mental Health 22:4:11-; December 1974.

25. Sandal, S. L. "Integrating Dance Therapy into Treatment." Hospital
and Community Psychiatry 26:7:439-440; July 1975.

Dance for Persons Who Are Visually or Hearing Impaired

26. Case, Maurice. Recreation for Blind Adults. Springfield, Illinois:
Charles C. Thomas, 1966.

The effects of blindness in adults, activity programs, and the admini-
strative technicalities of these programs are discussed. Activities
include arts and crafts, study and participation in dance and drama,
group activities and social events, literary and language activities,
nature outings, sporting events, and miscellaneOus activities. The
chain of administration, programing, financing, and physical facilities,
including operational problems, are included in addition to the practical
problems of recruiting, transporting, and charging patients for the
services.

27. Chapman, Ann, and Cramer, Miriam. Dance and the Blind Child. New York,:
American Dance Guild, Inc., 1973.

Details of teaching one blind child in a class of sighted children.
Includes 8 pages of lesson plans.

28. Duggar, Margaret P. "What Can Dance Be to Someone Who Cannot See?"
Journal of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 39:5:28-30; May 1968.

Methods _ : teaching blind children to dance are suggested, including
establishing a verbal vocabulary of movement and using analogy and
images. Also explained are methods of developing spatial awareness,
tidy awareness, and rhythmic perception, and of using instruments for
matching quality of sound and motion.

29. Kratz, L. E. Movement Without Sight. Palo Alto, California: Peek
Publications, 1973.

Provides a definition of blindness, the role of relaxation, and posture
locomotion. Activities cover individual stunts and self-testing,
rhythms, and dance.

30. Polk, Elizabeth. "Notes on the Demonstration of Dance Technique and
Creative Dance as Taught to Deaf Chile en, Ages 7-11." Journal of the
American Dance Therapy Association, In . 1:1:4-5; Fall 1968.

Methods and techniques for teaching deaf children to dance are suggested.

113
r.)

Page 113

31. Wisher, Peter R. "Dance and the Deaf." Journal of Health, Physical

Education, and Recreation 40:3:81; March 1969.

Discussion of considerations for hearing impaired participants in dance

activities. Accompaniment, tactile cues, creativity, balance, relation-
ship to speech development, student interest, and program values are

covered

Dance for Physically Handicapped Individuals

32. Hecox, Bernadette, Ellen Levine, and Diana Scott. "A Report on the Use

of Dance in Physical Rehabilitation: Every Body has a Right to Feel

Good." Rehabilitation Literature 36:1:11-16; January 1975.

Describes and evaluates a dance program for physically handicapped adults
that has been going on for three years at St. Luke's Hospital (New York

City). Components of a well-balanced session include body warm-up,
exercises based on dance techniques, movement involving others,
opportunity for individual expression, and movement just for fun. Five

case studies illustrate the values of dance to participants with various

physical handicaps.

114 11 1
.A.

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