Download Creating Family Web Sites for Dummies (ISBN - 076457938X) PDF

TitleCreating Family Web Sites for Dummies (ISBN - 076457938X)
TagsFor Dummies
LanguageEnglish
File Size13.7 MB
Total Pages386
Table of Contents
                            Creating Family Web Sites For Dummies
	About the Author
	Dedication
	Author’s Acknowledgments
	Contents at a Glance
	Table of Contents
	Introduction
		About This Book
		Conventions Used in This Book
		What You’re Not to Read
		Foolish Assumptions
		How This Book Is Organized
		Icons Used in This Book
		Where to Go from Here
	Part I: Introducing Family Web Sites
		Chapter 1: Touring Family Web Sites
			Connecting Families Over the Web
			Comparing Web Site Options
			Best Practices and Models
			Choosing Tools
		Chapter 2: Getting Organized
			Determining What You Want on Your Site
			Site Development Overview
			Setting Deadlines for Finishing Your Web Site
			The Never-Ending Project
		Chapter 3: Registering Your Site’s Domain Name
			Finding and Registering a Name
			Understanding Domain Name Endings
			Creating E-mail Addresses for the Family
		Chapter 4: Choosing a Web Hosting Service Provider
			Understanding Web Servers
			Choosing a Service Provider
			Publishing a Web Site to a Server
			Moving to a New Server
			Comparing Free Hosting Services
	Part II: Lookin’ Good: Images and Design
		Chapter 5: Gathering Images: Scanning, Downloading, and Finding Clip Art
			Click! Using Images You Find Online
			Searching for Photos and Clip Art
			Working with Scanners
			Downloading Images from a Digital Camera
		Chapter 6: Creating and Editing Images for the Web
			Introducing the Elements Workspace
			Cropping and Resizing Images
			Replacing and Editing Content
			Repairing the Signs of Wear, Tear, and Age
			Eliminating Red Eye
			Correcting Colors and Contrast Fast
			Choosing the Best Format for the Web
			Optimizing Images for the Web
			Creating Banners and Buttons
		Chapter 7: Organizing Images and Creating Photo Albums and Galleries
			Getting Organized
			Gathering Your Images
			Creating Photo Albums and Web Galleries
	Part III: Creating Web Pages and Adding Multimedia
		Chapter 8: Working with Microsoft FrontPage
			Introducing the Many Components of FrontPage 2003
			Before You Create or Edit Pages
			Creating a New Web Page
			Setting Links
			Changing Background Colors and Other Page Properties
			Creating Complex Page Designs with Tables and Layers
			Previewing Your Page in a Browser
			Publishing Your Pages to a Web Server
		Chapter 9: Timesaving Templates
			Understanding FrontPage Templates
			Finding Templates
			Creating New Pages and Sites
			Adding Templates to FrontPage
			Creating New Templates in FrontPage
		Chapter 10: Lights, Camera, Action: Adding Video, Audio, and Motion
			Adding Video to Your Web Pages
			Adding Audio to Your Web Pages
			Adding Animations with Flash
			Working with Other Multimedia Formats
	Part IV: Creating Special Project Sites
		Chapter 11: It’s a Baby! Web Site
			Creating an Online Photo Album
			Using the Templates on the CD
			Touring Baby Sites
			Editing the Graphics for Your Baby Site
			Preparing Photos for Your Baby Site
			Creating a Baby Web Site by Using the Templates
			Publishing Your Web Site
		Chapter 12: Happily Ever After: Creating aWedding Site
			Touring Wedding Sites
			Preparing Photos for Your Wedding Site
			Creating Your Wedding Site
			Publishing Your Web Site
		Chapter 13: Wish You Were Here: Vacation Sites
			Taking Your Visitors with You
			Preparing the Photos for Your Web Site
			Creating a Photomontage
			Customizing the Sample Template Site
			Publishing Your Web Site
		Chapter 14: In Your Spare Time: Creating Club, Sports, and Hobby Sites
			Identifying the Key Sections of Your Site
			Customizing Your Web Site Graphics
			Customizing the Template Site
			Editing the Video Pages
			Publishing Your Web Site
		Chapter 15: The Family Blog: Sharing Stories with an Online Journal
			Reading a Typical Blog
			How Families Are Using Blogs
			Writing a Good Blog
			Before You Blog
			Comparing Blogging Software and Services
	Part V: The Part of Tens
		Chapter 16: Ten Great Family Web Sites
			Earning Clams at Whyville
			Fooling Around with Yahooligans
			Asking Jeeves in Kids Speak
			Traveling Around The World
			Sitting in the Family Corner
			Answering Parents’ Questions
			Finding Out at Fun Brain
			Caring for the Whole Child
			Refdesk Helps with Homework
			The Digital Family Site
		Chapter 17: Ten Web Design Tips
			Keep It Simple
			Break Up Your Pages with White Space
			Back Up Your Site
			Be Consistent
			Stay Small and Fast
			Follow the Three Clicks Rule
			Map It Out
			Avoid Distracting Animations
			Don’t Cram Your Pages
			Work as a Team
		Chapter 18: Ten Tips for Testing, Updating, and Promoting Your Site
			Send an E-card to Announce Your New Site
			Make Your Site Easy to Find
			Update Regularly
			Wait Until New Technologies Are Widely Supported
			Make Your Pages Load Quickly
			Test Your Links
			Ask Friends and Family to Test Your Site
			Make It Easy for Visitors to Contact You
			Test for Accessibility
			Visit Other Web Sites for Ideas
	Part VI: Appendixes
		Appendix A: Calendar and Genealogy Resources
			Calendar Programs
			Genealogy Services and Family Tree Programs
		Appendix B: Glossary
		Appendix C: About the CD
			System Requirements
			Using the CD
			What You’ll Find on the CD
			Troubleshooting
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

by Janine Warner

Creating Family
Web Sites

FOR

DUMmIES


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Inserting video into a Web page
You can insert a video file on your Web page so that the file plays when a visi-
tor opens the page. However, I recommend that you create a special page for
each video file and give your viewers an idea of what to expect before they
click the link. You don’t want to surprise your visitors with video. You want
to coax them into it, setting the stage and making sure they know it’s worth
the wait to download your Academy-Award caliber production.

You insert video on a Web page much like you insert an image file, as you see
in the following exercise, except you have more settings. For example, you
can set video to play when someone opens a link, or you can require that visi-
tors roll their cursor over an image to make it play.

You can also choose to loop, or repeat, the video. Why would you want to
make a video file play over and over again? Playing a short video clip repeat-
edly is a clever way to make the clip seem longer than it is. For example, a
30-second clip of a child laughing may be highly entertaining when played
over and over again because it can sound like ongoing laughter.

174 Part III: Creating Web Pages and Adding Multimedia

Creating warnings for multimedia files
Because multimedia files require special players, it’s a good idea to include a warning message
anytime you add video, audio, or other multimedia files to your Web site. The message should
include an explanation of the type of file you’re using, the size of the file, how long it may take to
download, and what kind of player is required to view it.

The following is an example of a warning you might include just below a video file:

To play this video file, roll your cursor over the image above. The video clip is 30 seconds long
and shows our daughter in her karate class. If you’re using a modem connection, it may take
a minute or two for the video to download and play. If the video does not appear to be playing
or if you receive an error message, you may not have the necessary software to play the video.

You can download a free multimedia player for a Windows computer by visiting www.
microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia and clicking the link for Microsoft’s Windows
Media Player. Make sure to download the player that’s right for your operating system. If
you have an Apple computer, you’ll want the Mac version. If you use a PC, choose the Windows
version.

You may want to recommend another player or shorten the message. If you’re sure your visitors
have the necessary software to play your multimedia files, you may want to include only a descrip-
tion of the video or audio file and information about its length or file size. If you include more than
one version of the file in different formats or sizes, make sure to explain the options so your visi-
tors know which is best for their system.

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