Download Confronting Managerialism: How the Business Elite and Their Schools Threw Our Lives Out of Balance PDF

TitleConfronting Managerialism: How the Business Elite and Their Schools Threw Our Lives Out of Balance
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size949.4 KB
Total Pages240
Table of Contents
                            About the series
About the authors
Contents
Tables and figure
	Table 1.1 Membership in operations research societies in 
Europe and the USA
	Table 2.1 Christianity in the USA
	Figure  3.1 Big Three mass production process – post World War Two
	Table 3.1 Units of production – Japanese automobile firms, 2005–2006
	Table 3.2 Japanese auto parts manufacturers in North America
	Table 3.3 Production behavioral values – Big Three and the Toyota Production System
	Table 3.4 Comparative performance of major automobile firms, 
2006
	Table 4.1 German firms on the 2007 Fortune World 500 list
	Table 4.2 Japanese firms on the 2007 Fortune World 500 list
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction | Managerialism and business school 
education, 1920–1970
	Business school education
	British and American OR and educational traditions
1 | The failure of management science and the US business school model
	The OR experience: the new paradigm in postwar business schools
		Table 1.1 Membership in operations research societies in Europe and the USA
	Crumbling epistemologies: a critique of the new paradigm
	Business school response to major economic events
	The information technology revolution and business schools
2 | US managerialism and business schools fail to find their moral compass
	Managerialism’s missing moral compass
	Islam
	Confucianism
	Christian morality, the feudal heritage, and codetermination in Germany
	The moral basis of US managerialism post World War Two
	The breakup of moral order after 1980
		Table 2.1 Christianity in the USA
	Academia and business school education
3 | Managerialism and the decline of the US automobile industry
	Table 3.1 Units of production – Japanese automobile firms, 2005–2006
	Table 3.2 Japanese auto parts manufacturers in North America
	Managerialism in US automobile manufacturing
		Figure 3.1 Big Three mass production process – post World War Two
	The Japanese production system
		Table 3.3 Production behavioral values – Big Three and the Toyota Production System
		Table 3.4 Comparative performance of major automobile firms, 2006
	The response of US managerialism to the Japanese automobile challenge
	German automobile firms’ response to the Japanese challenge
	Conclusion
4 | Managerialism, business schools, and our financial crisis
	Agency conflict versus managerialism
	Germany and Japan
		Table 4.1 German firms on the 2007 Fortune World 500 list
		Table 4.2 Japanese firms on the 2007 Fortune World 500 list
	US managerialism and finance capitalism
	Business schools and the derivatives market
	Constructing the vehicle of greed
	Denouement
Conclusion | Back to balance
	How about reform?
References
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Zed Books is an independent progressive publisher with a
reputation for cutting-edge international publishing. Innovative
and thought-provoking, the Economic Controversies series
strips back the often impenetrable façade of economic jargon
to present bold new ways of looking at pressing issues, while
explaining the hidden mechanics behind them. Concise and
accessible, the books bring a fresh, unorthodox approach to a
variety of controversial subjects.

Series editor Edward Fullbrook is the founder and editor of
the Real World Economics Review (formerly the Post-Autistic
Economics Review), which has over 11,500 subscribers. He has
edited a number of books on economics, including Pluralist
Economics (2008) and A Guide to What’s Wrong with Economics
(2004), and his essays on economics and philosophy have
appeared in numerous anthologies and journals.

Already published in the Economic Controversies series:

Yanis Varoufakis, The Global Minotaur: America, the True
Origins of the Financial Crisis and the Future of the World
Economy

Page 120

99us managerialism and business schools

challenge by its very name strongly opposed the new paradigm
in management education. But it missed its mark.

Like Marx, postmodernists stand Enlightenment rhetoric
on its head in order the better to attack it. Whereas Marx talked
about how the bourgeoisie created a superstructure of thought
and moral teachings to protect its interests, the postmodern-
ists discuss how dominant groups construct authoritative
meta-narratives that ignore the life experience of the disadvan-
taged – women, slaves, minorities, nonwhites, and generally
the poor – and leave the fact of their exploitation hidden, that
is, until the postmodernists deconstruct the rhetoric of the
dominant dialogue.

Since the new management paradigm is modernism par
excellence, the rhetoric it employs is a prime example of what
postmodernists are talking about. When the neoclassical econo-
mist states that “demand for labor varies inversely to wages,”
he uses “neutral analytical” language, a principle of economics.
When he adds another principle, that “labor is most eÃectively
utilized when workers compete in a free job market,” he uses a
meta-narrative of the dominant capitalist class, which obscures
the fact that these principles send actual working people on a
race to the bottom in their competition with each other. If the
scientist invents a mathematical model of general equilibrium or
rational choice theory in order to acquire prescriptive rigor, he
continues the meta-narrative of dominance under the guise of
neutral mathematical functions. Or, if neoclassical economists
develop an “in�nite growth model,” which purports to “show
how and why it is possible for production and consumption
to grow forever,” and that model ignores the ecosystem, then
their scienti�c language harms the environmental interests of
mankind. It turned out, then, that the new paradigm in manage-
ment studies did not abolish ethical considerations but only
obscured them.

Page 121

100 confronting managerialism

The problem is that the postmodernist attack on positivism
had unintended results because it weakened the position of the
humanities in universities more than it did science, technology,
and the new paradigm in business schools. The postmodernist
critique originated in philosophy and linguistics; it is and has
always been preoccupied with language, with deconstruction of
texts, not with mathematics, natural science, or engineering. It
mounted a determined attack primarily in the humanities – in
history, in philosophy, in literary criticism, in religious studies,
and in other liberal arts – confidence in the moral educational
value of which were deeply shaken by the force of the critique.
But science, technology, and business studies – the real modern-
ists’ disciplines – have not been shaken a bit by the postmod-
ernist movement.

Postmodernism undoubtedly ended the authoritative narra-
tive (Lyotard) in the humanities when it introduced new voices
into the dialogue, but it also, inadvertently perhaps, weakened
the humanities within the university. It has been, its critics in
the humanities say, a negative if not destructive force because it
has torn down the Enlightenment project without putting any
ethical norms in its place. Its critique of the humanities amounts
to “an unjustified betrayal of the modernist project of building
an ever better world” (Beyer, 2006, 2).

The money mills

Does this mean that Humboldt’s vision was wrong? Not
according to people in the humanities. For them the problem
arises not so much from the expansion within the academy of
empirical science and technology at the expense of the humani-
ties. The problem does not even come from science’s meth-
odological lack of concern for ethics. The issue is not science
and technology but scientists, engineers, and business students

Page 239

About Zed Books

Zed Books is a critical and dynamic publisher, committed to
increasing awareness of important international issues and to
promoting diversity, alternative voices and progressive social

change. We publish on politics, development, gender, the
environment and economics for a global audience of students,
academics, activists and general readers. Run as a co-operative,
Zed Books aims to operate in an ethical and environmentally

sustainable way.

Find out more at:
www.zedbooks.co.uk

For up-to-date news, articles, reviews and events
information visit:

http://zed-books.blogspot.com

To subscribe to the monthly Zed Books e-newsletter,
send an email headed ‘subscribe’ to

[email protected]

We can also be found on
Facebook, ZNet, Twitter and Library Thing.

Similer Documents