Download Complementary and alternative medicine in the UK and Germany: A PDF

TitleComplementary and alternative medicine in the UK and Germany: A
LanguageEnglish
File Size398.2 KB
Total Pages128
Table of Contents
                            Contents
	List of figures
	List of tables
Acknowledgements
Executive summary
PART I
I.1 Introduction
	I.1.1 Rationale
	I.1.2 Aims
	I.1.3 Research methods
I.2 Definitions and classifications
	I.2.1 Defining complementary and alternative medicine and
	I.2.2 Classifications and concepts within complementary
	I.2.3 Who are considered to be CAM providers?
	I.2.4 What are considered to be CAM therapies?
	I.2.5 Dictionary of CAM therapies
	I.2.6 Summary
I.3 Supply and demand in the
	I.3.1 Summary: country report United Kingdom
	I.3.2 Summary: country report Germany
	I.3.3 Discussion
I.4 Methodological challenges
	I.4.1 Scope of CAM
	I.4.2 Time period specification
	I.4.3 Training and registration
	I.4.4 Expenditure and income data
I.5 Relevance for policy and
	I.5.1 Policy issues
	I.5.2 Scope for future research
I.6 Conclusions
References and bibliography
PART II
II.1 Methodology
	II.1.1 Demand for CAM
	II.1.2 Supply of CAM
II.2 Demand for and utilisation of CAM
	II.2.1 Surveys on utilisation of CAM therapies/services
	II.2.2 Surveys of CAM products
	II.2.3 Demographics
	II.2.4 Presenting problem/diagnosis
	II.2.5 Reason for use
	II.2.6 Reported out-of-pocket expenditure
	II.2.7 Providers
II.3 CAM providers
	II.3.1 Physicians
	II.3.2 Other health care professionals
	II.3.3 Registered CAM practitioners
	II.3.4 Non-registered CAM providers (private market)
	II.3.5 Employment and working conditions
II.4 CAM services
	II.4.1. Health authorities
	II.4.2 General practice fundholding
	II.4.3 Primary care groups/primary care trusts
	II.4.4 Inpatient services
II.5 CAM products
	II.5.1 Over-the-counter medication
	II.5.2 CAM products paid for by the NHS
	II.5.3 Retailers
II.6 Service-provider-finance matrix
References
PART III
III.1 Methodology
III.2 Demand for and utilisation of CAM
	III.2.1 Utilisation of CAM providers and services
	III.2.2 Utilisation of CAM products
	III.2.3 Reasons for use
	III.2.4 Reported out-of-pocket expenditure
III.3 CAM providers
	III.3.1 Physicians
	III.3.2 Other health care professionals
	III.3.3 State-registered CAM practitioners – Heilpraktiker
	III.3.4 Non-registered CAM providers
III.4 CAM services
	III.4.1 Ambulatory statutory health insurance benefits
	III.4.2 Ambulatory services financed by statutory health
	III.4.3 Services financed by private health insurance or
	III.4.4 Inpatient services
III.5 CAM products
	III.5.1 CAM medicines funded by statutory health insurance
	III.5.2 Over-the-counter medication
	III.5.3 Retailers
III.6 Service-provider-finance matrix
References and bibliography
Appendix 1: Authors
Appendix 2:
Appendix 3:
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

C
o

m
p

le
m

en
ta

ry
a

n
d

A
lt

er
n

at
iv

e
M

ed
ic

in
e

in
t

h
e

U
K

a
n

d
G

er
m

an
y


R

es
ea

rc
h

a
n

d
E

vi
d

en
ce

o
n

S
u

p
p

ly
a

n
d

D
em

an
d

A
n

n
a

D
ix

o
n

,A
n

n
et

te
R

ie
sb

er
g

,S
u

sa
n

n
e

W
ei

n
b

re
n

n
er

,O
m

er
S

ak
a,

Ju
lia

n
L

e
G

ra
n

d
,R

ei
n

h
ar

d
B

u
ss

e

2003

Anglo-German Foundation for the
Study of Industrial Society/

Deutsch-Britische Stiftung für das
Studium der Industriegesellschaft

Page 64

proxy for the number of practitioners delivering CAM therapies in total. However, they
do not distinguish between whether practitioners are registered or not.

II.3.5 Employment and working conditions

Davies (1984), discussed above, also included data on the number of specialties practised.
Of the 411 practitioners practising a main therapy, 212 also practised a second therapy
and 104 a third. Half the respondents in the 1983 survey of registered practitioners were
working with two or more fellow practitioners in either the same field or in different
fields. In Davies’ sample 9 per cent worked with a medical doctor; 73 per cent worked full-
time and 27 per cent part-time. The highest levels of full-time practice were among
chiropractors and osteopaths: 88 per cent and 86 per cent respectively. The lowest levels
of full-time working were among acupuncturists and homeopaths. No data on the income
of CAM therapists were identified in the literature search.

50

COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IN THE UK AND GERMANY

© Anglo-German Foundation for the Study of Industrial Society

Page 65

II.4 CAM services

There is no list of CAM services that are covered by the NHS in the UK. In this sense CAM
services are not explicitly excluded, but neither is there a requirement to fund them. In
fact, the majority of consultations are in the private sector, with NHS-funded
consultations accounting for less than 10 per cent of all CAM consultations (Thomas et al.,
2001a).

The purchasers of health care have some discretion over what services to buy and from
whom, but their confidence for funding CAM is highly dependent on the availability of
information. In a survey of health care purchasers (van Haselen and Fisher, 1999) evidence
about effectiveness from clinical trials was rated to be most important, followed by safety
data and economic evaluations.

During the 1990s and early 2000s the UK has seen significant health care reform, with the
purchaser role first split between GP fundholders and health authorities then shifted to
newly created primary care groups/primary care trusts (PCGs/PCTs). Thus there is a lot of
variation over time and between areas, both in the models of provision and the sources
of funding.

In their qualitative research of ten case studies of primary care provision of CAM therapies
Luff and Thomas (1999, 2000) identified a number of models of CAM provision, including:

• Sessional complementary therapies in-house

• Provision by GPs

• Referrals to a local independent complementary therapy clinic (funded)

• Referrals to a local independent complementary therapy clinic (non-funded)

• Complementary therapists in an adjacent complementary health centre.

The sources of funding for these services also varied and included:

• Fundholding budgets

• Registered charity

• Charitable trust

• Fee for service (out of pocket)

• Health authority.

II.4.1. Health authorities

In 1993 the National Association of Health Authorities (NAHAT), now the NHS
Confederation, conducted a national survey of district health authorities, family health
service authorities and GP fundholders to find out their approach to purchasing CAM
therapies. This estimated that approximately £1 million per year was being spent by

51

COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IN THE UK AND GERMANY

© Anglo-German Foundation for the Study of Industrial Society

Page 127

German English

Klassische Naturheilkunde Classical naturopathy

Klimatherapie Climatotherapy

Kneipp-Therapie Kneipp therapy

Kognitive und Verhaltenstherapie Cognitive and behaviour therapies

Komplementäre Therapien Complementary therapies

Körper-Geist- und Entspannungstechniken Mind-body and relaxation techniques

Körper-Geist-Beziehungen (Metaphysik) Mind-body relations (metaphysics)

Körpertherapie nach Heller Hellerwork

Körpertherapien Bodywork therapies

Kräutertherapie Herbal medicine

Kristalltherapie Crystal therapy

Kryotherapie, Kältetherapie Cryotherapy, cold therapy

Kunsttherapie Art therapy

Kurmedizin Spa medicine

Lebensberatung Life-coaching

Lymphdrainage Manual lymph drainage

Magnetfeldtherapie Magnetic field therapy

Maharishi ayurvedische Medizin Maharishi Ayurvedic medicine

Makrobiotik Macrobiotics

Manualtherapie Manipulative therapy

Massage Massage

Mayr-Kur (Fastenkur) Mayr regimen (fasting therapy)

Meditation Meditation

Medizinische Klimatologie Medical climatology

Meridiane Meridians

Methode nach Bates (Augenmuskeltraining) Bates method

Mikrobiologische Therapie Microbiological remedies

Musiktherapie Music therapy

Naturheilverfahren Naturopathy

Natürliche Geburt Natural childbirth

Neuraltherapie Neural therapy

Neurolinguistisches Progammieren NLP

Ohrakupunktur Ear acupuncture

Ordnungstherapie (Kneipp) Order therapy

Orgontherapie nach W. Reich Orgontherapy

Osteopathie Osteopathy

Östliche Medizin (Tibb) Eastern medicine (Tibb)

Ozontherapie Ozone therapy

Pflanzenheilkunde/Kräutertherapie Herbal medicine

Physikalische Medizin Physical medicine

Physikalische Therapie, Physiotherapie Physical therapy

Phytotherapie Phytotherapy

Pilates Pilates

Qi Gong Qi Gong

(continued)

113

COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IN THE UK AND GERMANY

© Anglo-German Foundation for the Study of Industrial Society

Page 128

German English

Reflexzonentherapie Reflexology

Regulationsverfahren Regulation therapy

Reiki Reiki

Rolfing Rolfing

Sauerstofftherapie, Sauerstoff-Mehrschritt-Therapie Oxygen therapy, oxygen therapy according to
nach v. Ardenne Ardenne

Schüssler-Salze Biochemic tissue salts

Selbsthilfegruppen Self-help groups

Shiatsu Shiatsu

Spieltherapie Play therapy

Spirituelle Therapien Spiritual therapies

Stress Management Stress management

Tai Qi Tai Chi

Tanztherapie Dance therapy

Thalassotherapie Thalassotherapy

Thermographie Thermography

Thermotherapie Thermotherapy

Traditionelle afrikanische Medizin African traditional medicine

Traditionelle chinesische Medizin Chinese traditional medicine

Traditionelle Medizin Traditional medicine

Traditionelle orientalische Medizin Oriental traditional medicine

Unani-Medizin Unani medicine

Yoga Yoga

114

COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IN THE UK AND GERMANY

© Anglo-German Foundation for the Study of Industrial Society

Similer Documents