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TitleChanging Lives
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages98
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Page 1

w w w . s c o t l a n d . g o v . u k

9 780755 948246

ISBN 0-7559-4824-6

© Crown copyright 2006

This document is also available on the Scottish Executive website:
www.scotland.gov.uk

Astron B43115 01/06

Further copies are available from
Blackwell’s Bookshop
53 South Bridge
Edinburgh
EH1 1YS

Telephone orders and enquiries
0131 622 8283 or 0131 622 8258

Fax orders
0131 557 8149

Email orders
[email protected]

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changing

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Report of the 21st Century Social Work Review

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Report of the 21st Century Social Work Review

changing


lives


Scottish Executive, Edinburgh 2006

Page 49

Changing Lives

A national integrated policy
framework
Policy making within at least four
Scottish Executive departments
impacts on social work services as a
whole. While there have been positive
benefits from this approach in
promoting integration around the
needs of different client groups, it has
created some confusion of messages
and unnecessarily complex funding,
planning, reporting and inspection
mechanisms.

People at all levels have spoken to us
about the disproportionate
bureaucracy and systems in social
work. Some of this is associated with
Scottish Executive reporting
requirements, some with risk aversion,
creating additional burdens on the
whole system following something
going wrong in one part.

If social work services are to respond
flexibly and creatively to current and
future demand, it is essential that a
more integrated approach is
developed. This should reduce the
administrative burden on local
authorities and their planning partners
and ensure that the desired outcomes
of current and new policy are met.

Simplified governance and funding
arrangements
The ability of local authorities and their
planning partners to integrate services
around the needs of people who use
services is constrained by overly
complex governance and funding
arrangements. In practice, this often
means that success is only achieved
through compromise and considerable

An older person with intensive care needs can have care funded from four discrete funding streams, each
with its own audit and reporting process:

Assistance with personal care ➝ Free personal care monies
Practical support (housework, shopping etc) ➝ Housing support (Supporting people monies)
Day centre attendance ➝ GAE (mainstream social work budget)
Physiotherapy and overnight care ➝ Delayed discharge monies

effort and goodwill to negotiate
complex systems. If integrated working
is to become the norm, then greater
clarity and direction on governance
and funding arrangements is required
at national level.

5. Social work services must
recognise and effectively manage
the mixed economy of care in the
delivery of services

This requires:
● new commissioning models

based on partnership and delivery
of personalised services;

● more effective partnership
working between commissioners
and providers; and

● effective joint working to address
the needs of people who use
services.

To be fit for the future, local authorities
and their planning partners will need
more streamlined, flexible approaches
to commissioning services that
recognise and make best use of the
knowledge and skills of providers in
both the planning and delivery of care.

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Report of the 21st Century Social Work Review

They will need approaches that will
support increasing personalisation of
service delivery.

The social work market
The delivery of social work services
has changed dramatically over recent
years. The voluntary and private
sectors now play a vital role in the
delivery of care and support to many
thousands of people. The ability of
providers to respond flexibly, creatively
and quickly to new demands has
enabled them to develop ground
breaking new services.

However, there are some very real
issues that need to be addressed in
making the relationship between
public, voluntary and private sectors fit
for the future. A multi-million pound
market for social work and social care
has been created and needs to be
managed. Purchasing needs to make
effective use of public funds through
best value and good commissioning
practices. It also needs to recognise
that a significant part of the expertise
required to commission and provide
services effectively sits outside local
authorities, requiring new approaches
to managing the relationship between
sectors.

The social service workforce
In total around 104,000 people work
in the sector of which around 6,500
are social workers.

Of the total workforce:

●� 45% work for a local authority;
●� 30% for a private sector provider;

and
●� 25% for a voluntary sector

provider.
(2004, Labour Force Survey)
(Figures exclude early education
& child care and occupational
therapists)

The commissioning process
Large voluntary organisations
described having numerous different
contractual arrangements, sometimes
having several with one local authority.
These take up an inordinate amount of
time and effort. National voluntary
organisations currently have service
level agreements containing the same
information in different formats for
delivering the same service in each
local authority. Despite the demands
made by local authorities, many
providers spoke of contracts that
remain unsigned, or reviews that did
not take place within specified
timescales. There is often little

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Changing Lives

10. Social work services must
develop enabling leadership and
effective management at all levels
and across the system.
This requires:

● a national framework for developing
leadership and management;

● a leadership style that gives staff,
users and managers the power to
develop creative solutions;

● strengthening of strategic
professional leadership;

● development of academic
leadership and

● development of effective citizen
leadership.

11. Social work services must be
monitored and evaluated on the
delivery of improved outcomes for
people who use services, their
carers and communities.
This requires:

● a performance improvement
framework for all social work
services, based on outcomes;

● elimination of unnecessary
information gathering;

● development of tools to share
learning and support practitioners to
improve and evaluate outcomes;

● an annual performance
improvement report, peer assessed
and published by chief social work
officers; and

● inspectorates to use performance
improvement frameworks as a
means of reducing the regulatory
burden on services.

12. Social work services should
develop the capacity and capability
for transformational change by
focusing on re-designing services
and organisational development.
This requires:

● new capacity for service redesign
and organisational development;

● organisational development capacity
in social work services;

● evidence based models of service
redesign to support performance
improvement;

● proactive use of technology to
transform the delivery of services; and

● national and local fora to support
the development of social work.

13. The Scottish Executive should
consolidate in legislation the new
direction of Scottish social work
services.

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changing

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Report of the 21st Century Social Work Review

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© Crown copyright 2006

This document is also available on the Scottish Executive website:
www.scotland.gov.uk

Astron B43115 01/06

Further copies are available from
Blackwell’s Bookshop
53 South Bridge
Edinburgh
EH1 1YS

Telephone orders and enquiries ISBN 0-7559-4824-6
0131 622 8283 or 0131 622 8258

Fax orders
0131 557 8149

Email orders
[email protected] 9 780755 948246

w w w . s c o t l a n d . g o v . u k

http://www.scotland.gov.uk
mailto:[email protected]

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