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TitleCaring for Trafficked Persons
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.4 MB
Total Pages124
Document Text Contents
Page 1

GUIDANCE FOR HEALTH PROVIDERS

CARING
FOR
TRAFFICKED
PERSONS

TRAINING
FACILITATOR’S GUIDE

International Organization for Migration (IOM)

Page 2

The opinions expressed in this guide are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the International
Organization for Migration (IOM). The designations employed and the presentation of the material throughout the guide
do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of IOM concerning the legal status of any country,
territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning its frontiers or boundaries.

IOM is committed to the principle that humane and orderly migration benefits migrants and society. As an intergovernmental
organization, IOM acts with its partners in the international community to: assist in meeting the operational challenges of
migration; advance understanding of migration issues; encourage social and economic development through migration;
and uphold the human dignity and well-being of migrants.

Editors: Rosilyne Borland
International Organization for Migration
Migrant Assistance Division

Cathy Zimmerman
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Gender Violence & Health Centre

Publisher: International Organization for Migration
17 route des Morillons
1211 Geneva 19
Switzerland
Tel.: + 41 22 717 91 11
Fax: + 41 22 798 61 50
E-mail: [email protected]
Internet: www.iom.int

______________

This publication was made possible through support provided by the United States Department of State, under the terms
of Award No. S-SGTIP-10-GR-0026. The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect
the views of the United States Department of State.

ISBN 978-92-9068-655-2

© 2012 International Organization for Migration (IOM)
© 2012 London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)

______________

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form
or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written permission of
the publisher.

46_12

Page 62

Part 2: Core Training
SESSION 354

Slide 3

CORE MODULE
Trauma-informed Care



NOTe This slide begins Session 3: Trauma-informed Care.

This is a good moment to remind participants that we are now going to begin to focus on how to interact
with trafficked persons in specialized ways.

Slide 4
Session Objectives

Recognise key features of trauma-informed
care

Recognise techniques for provider and
patient safety

Understand the benefits of specialized care
approaches for trafficked persons



LeARNINg ObjeCTIveS By the end of this session, you will be able to:

• Recognize key features of trauma-informed care
• Recognize techniques for provider and patient safety
• Understand the benefits of specialized care approaches for trafficked

persons

These learning objectives are the focus of the current session and the rest of day one of the training.

Slide 5

“Health workers should stay within the
confines of diagnosing medical

problems and not ask patients about
exploitative situations or trafficking in

persons.”



NOTe This slide begins to explore the role of the health provider, particularly as related to
violence. The idea of this slide is first to elicit reactions from the health providers about
their own feelings in response to the statement, and second, to emphasize that violence
has health consequences so health providers need to find ways to talk about it as part of

their job. Trauma-informed care is based on the concept that service providers recognize the effects of
violence on survivors and respond to people’s special care needs.

Page 63

Caring for Trafficked Persons: Guidance for Health Providers – Training
FaCiliTaTor’s Guide 55

ACTIvITY Role of the health provider (during presentation). As a full group, ask participants what
they think of this statement. Is it true? False?

ImPORTANT There is no wrong answer to this statement. If health providers agree with the statement,
you as the facilitator can respond by being empathetic as to how difficult it may be in
their setting to talk about these sorts of topics. But gently make the point that because
of the health consequences of violence (such as trafficking), it is important to

acknowledge what they have experienced and consider how these experiences might affect their health
and the health providers’ approach to care.

Slide 6

• Trafficking, like other forms of violence, is a

health problem

• It is part of a health assessment

• It should be addressed in a clinical encounter

Trafficking is a health problem



NOTe This slide reinforces the message from the previous slide, that trafficking has health
implications and should be addressed in a clinical encounter. Just as we ask about other
health issues (e.g. do you smoke?) we need to ask about experiences that may be affecting
their health. The way we do this is key.

ImPORTANT Though in some trafficking cases the health risks are extreme, the symptoms are not
always obvious, especially if the health provider sees the trafficked person after the
signs of physical injuries have disappeared. Remind participants that even if they don’t
see signs of trauma (physical or psychological) that doesn’t mean people are not

suffering post-trauma reactions. Think back to the lists of symptoms we looked at in Session 2.

Slide 7
What is “trauma-informed care”

Trauma-informed care is about:

• Recognising violence in patient encounters and in your

clinical practice

• Learning about and being accepting of the effects that

traumatic events can have on people’s attitude, behaviour

and perceptions of their body

• Making time and space for individuals to disclose and

describe traumatic events

• Addressing violence in sensitive and safe ways

• Being prepared to facilitate referral to other medical and non-

medical services



NOTe This slide introduces the concept and definition of trauma-informed care.

CONSIDeR You might want to remind participants of the information in Session 2, which showed
why people who have been trafficked might act distant, untrusting, or hostile. It is a
natural reaction for a health provider to have an emotional response when a patient acts
in these ways. Part of a trauma-informed approach is recognizing that these actions are

related to what the person has experienced.

Page 124

International Organization for Migration (IOM)
17 route des Morillons 1211 Geneva 19 Switzerland

Tel.: + 41 22 717 91 11 � Fax: + 41 22 798 61 50
E-mail: [email protected] � Internet: www.iom.int

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