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TitleCareer Explorations
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.2 MB
Total Pages100
Table of Contents
                            Acknowledgments
CONTENTS
UNIT OVERVIEW
A Growth Industry
	The Hidden Infrastructure: Jobs in Health Science
	Demand: Our Growing and Aging Population
	Supply: The Problem in the Pipeline
	Writing a Research Paper: Overview
Taking a Closer Look
	Know Yourself
	Writing a Research Paper: Introduction to Research
	Writing a Research Paper: Organizing Information
	Biomedical Visionaries and Advances in Health Science
Finding a Good Match
	Comparing Salary and Education
	Writing a Research Paper: Writing Process
	Writing a Research Paper: Citations
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Career
Explorations

I N T E G R A T E D
C U R R I C U L U M U N I T O N

H E A L T H S C I E N C E
C A R E E R S

Health Science
& Biomedical
Program of Study

Page 2

ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career

2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 1200

Berkeley, CA 94704

510-849-4945

FAX: 510-841-1076

www.ConnectEdCalifornia.org

National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education

2410 Woodlake Drive

Okemos, MI 48864-3997

www.nchste.org

Copyright © 2007 by ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career. All rights reserved.

Pages from this unit may be reprinted or photocopied for free distribution, with attribution to

ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career and the National Consortium on Health Science

and Technology Education.

Contributing Teacher Team:

Gorton High School

Yonkers, NY

Contributing ConnectEd Staff:

Director for Program and Curriculum Development: Paula Hudis

Curriculum Developers: Pier Sun Ho (Lead), Khanh Bui, Aaron Malloy, Charles Stephen

Publishing/Editorial Staff: Barbara Kridl, Andrea Livingston, Natesh Daniel, Patti Gildersleeve,

Alicia Broadway, Leslie Tilley, Dave Abston, Goura Fotadar McCarty, Becky Chapman-Winter

Administrative Staff: Melody Rose

Contributing NCHSTE Representatives:

Health Science and Biomedical Program of Study Project Director: Beverly Campbell

Executive Director: Carole Stacy

Coordination, Site Sponsorship, and Teacher Team Support: Nancy Allen, SeAnne Safaii, Cindy Beck,

Fran Beauman, Rhonda Patterson, Karen Batchelor, Thalea Longhurst, Jen Staley, Michael Mitchell,

Clarice Morris, Scott Snelson, Bruce Bird, Paul Jackson

Page 50

Name __________________________________________________ Date _____________ Period __________

Career Explorations © 2007 ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career Career Explorations 44

Taking a Closer Look—Lesson 2.1

Personality Self-Evaluation and Career Matching Matrix1

First � make an inventory of your interests.

1. o Work on a farm or help save a rainforest.

2. o Solve complicated math problems.

3. o Act in a movie or play.

4. o Study social groups in society.

5. o Interview strangers for the TV news.

6. o Learn about and study the economy.

7. o Study “how-to” mechanics manuals.

8. o Perform science lab experiments.

9. o Manage an art gallery.

10. o Conduct a religious service.

11. o Bargain at a flea market.

12. o Write up graphs or charts with statistics.

13. o Build cabinets or furniture.

14. o Study nature outdoors or trace the effects of
pollution on the environment.

15. o Write a movie screenplay.

16. o Lead a club or scout troop.

17. o Buy merchandise for a store.

18. o Work 9:00 to 5:00 in a corporate office.

19. o Operate heavy machinery.

20. o Play chess.

21. o Work on an art or a music magazine.

22. o Get involved in a charity or community
organization.

23. o Do fast-paced, high-pressure sales work.

24. o Design computer games and programs.

25. o Work outside in a national park.

26. o Research a law case.

27. o Play a musical instrument.

28. o Work with babies or children.

29. o Run for class office.

30. o Work after school to save money.

31. o Set up a sound system.

32. o Read science fiction.

33. o Write a short story, play, or novel.

34. o Entertain at a party.

35. o Work in a politician’s office.

36. o Enter documents into a computer.

37. o Build a jet aircraft model.

38. o Use an electron microscope or
high-tech medical instrument.

39. o Design a new line of clothes.

40. o Read and discuss literature.

41. o Debate political and social issues on TV.

42. o Keep accurate records of a business.

43. o Repair a car engine.

44. o Identify constellations of stars.

45. o Take pottery classes.

46. o Work with senior citizens.

47. o Sell products on commission.

48. o Set up a budget for running a large company
or government agency.

Copyright © 2004 by Career Communications, Inc., publishers of American Careers Educational Programs. Originally published in
the American Careers Health Careers Planner, Vol. 1 and 2. Reprinted with permission.

Page 51

Name __________________________________________________ Date _____________ Period __________

Career Explorations © 2007 ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career Career Explorations 45

Taking a Closer Look—Lesson 2.1

Second � add up your scores.
Below, circle the numbers you checked off. Count the number of circles in each line. Then enter that total
in the blank space at the end of each line.

Personality Types Total

A. Doers 1 7 13 19 25 31 37 43

B. Investigators 2 8 14 20 26 32 38 44

C. Artists 3 9 15 21 27 33 39 45

D. Helpers 4 10 16 22 28 34 40 46

E. Enterprisers 5 11 17 23 29 35 41 47

F. Detailers 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48

Third � evaluate yourself.
In what two personality types did you score the highest? Write the names in the blank spaces below.

Match your personality type with potential health and biomedical science careers using the chart on the
next page.

Copyright © 2004 by Career Communications, Inc., publishers of American Careers Educational Programs. Originally published in
the American Careers Health Careers Planner, Vol. 1 and 2. Reprinted with permission.

Page 99

Name __________________________________________________ Date _____________ Period __________

Career Explorations © 2007 ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career Career Explorations 93

APA Bibliography Guide
The following rules for handling works by a single author or multiple authors apply to all APA-style refer-
ences in your reference list, regardless of the type of work (book, article, electronic resource, etc.):

Single Author
Last name first, followed by author initials.

Berndt, T. J. (2002). Friendship quality and social development. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 11,

7–10.

Two Authors
List by their last names and initials. Use the “&” instead of “and.”

Wegener, D. T., & Petty, R. E. (1994). Mood management across affective states: The hedonic contingency

hypothesis. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 66, 1034–1048.

Three to Six Authors
List by last names and initials; commas separate author names, while the last author name is preceded
again by “&.” If there are more than six authors, list the first six as above and then et al., which means
“and others.”

Reference List: Articles in Periodicals
Basic Form
APA style dictates that authors are listed by last name followed by initials; publication year goes inside
parentheses and is followed by a period. The title of the article is in sentence-case, meaning only the first
word of the title and subtitle and proper nouns in the title are capitalized. The periodical name is in title
case and is followed by the volume number which, with the title, is also italicized or underlined.

Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume number(issue
number), pages.

Article in a Magazine
Henry, W. A., III. (1990, April 9). Making the grade in today’s schools. Time, 135, 28–31.

Article in a Newspaper
In APA style, p. or pp. precedes page numbers for a newspaper reference, unlike references to other types
of periodicals. Single pages take p., e.g., “p. B2”; multiple pages take pp., e.g., “pp. B2, B4” or “pp. C1,
C3–C4.”

Schultz, S. (2005, December 28). Calls made to strengthen state energy policies. The Country Today,

pp. 1A, 2A.

Finding a Good Match—Lesson 3.3

Page 100

Name __________________________________________________ Date _____________ Period __________

Career Explorations © 2007 ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career Career Explorations 94

Reference List: Electronic Sources
Article From an Online Periodical
Online articles follow the same guidelines for printed articles. Include all information the online host
makes available, including an issue number in parentheses.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Online Periodical, volume number
(issue number if available). Retrieved month day, year, from http://www.someaddress.com/full/url/.

Bernstein, M. (2002). 10 tips on writing the living Web. A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites, 149.
Retrieved May 2, 2006, from http://www.alistapart.com/articles/writeliving.

Finding a Good Match—Lesson 3.3

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