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TitleBRAND PERSONALITY PERCEPTIONS OF LUXURY SEDAN MOTOR VEHICLES AMONGST THE ...
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LanguageEnglish
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Table of Contents
                            1
	1.1 INTRODUCTION
	1.2 PROBLEM STATEMENT
	1.3 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
		1.3.1 Primary objective
		1.3.2 Theoretical objectives
		1.3.3 Empirical objectives
	1.4 HYPOTHESES TESTING
	1.5 RESEARCH DESIGN METHODOLOGY
		1.5.1 Literature review
		1.5.2 Empirical study
			1.5.2.1 Target population
			1.5.2.2 Sampling frame
			1.5.2.3 Sampling method
			1.5.2.4 Sample size
			1.5.2.5 Measuring instrument and data collection method
			1.5.2.6 Statistical analysis
	1.6 CHAPTER CLASSIFICATION
	1.7 ETHICS STATEMENT
	1.8 CONCLUSION
2
	2.1 Introduction
	2.2 DEFINING BRANDING
		2.2.1 Brand name
		2.2.2 Brand mark/logo
		2.2.3 Brand image
		2.2.4 Brand awareness
		2.2.5 Brand loyalty
		2.2.6 Brand equity
		2.2.7 Brand strategy
		2.2.8 Brand positioning
		2.2.9 Brand personality
	2.3 AAKER’S BRAND PERSONALITY TRAIT SCALE
	2.4 MARKETING STRATEGY ELEMENTS INFLUENCED BY BRAND PERSONALITY
		2.4.1 Product
		2.4.2 Place
		2.4.3 Price
		2.4.4 Promotion
	2.5 BRAND PERSONALITY’S INFLUENCE ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
	2.6 LUXURY SEDAN MOTOR VEHICLES IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN MARKET
	2.7 FACTORS INFLUENCING THE PURCHASE DECISIONS OF LUXURY SEDANS
	2.8 PURCHASING INTENTIONS
	2.9 GENERATION Y
	2.10 CONCLUSION
3
	3.1 Introduction
	3.2 RESEARCH DESIGN
	3.3 RESEARCH APPROACH
	3.4 SAMPLING STRATEGY
		3.4.1 Target Population
		3.4.2 Sampling frame
		3.4.3 Method of sampling
		3.4.4 Sample size
	3.5 DATA COLLECTION METHOD
		3.5.1 Measuring instrument and data Collection
		3.5.2 Questionnaire design
		3.5.3 Questioning format
			3.5.3.1 Step 1: Brand identification
			3.5.3.2 Step 2: Brand personality perceptions
		3.5.4 Questionnaire layout
	3.6 ADMINISTRATION OF THE QUESTIONNAIRES
	3.7 PILOT TESTING OF THE QUESTIONNAIRES
	3.8 DATA PREPARATION
	3.9 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
		3.9.1 Descriptive statistics
			3.9.1.1 Frequency distribution
			3.9.1.2 Mean
			3.9.1.3 Median
			3.9.1.4 Mode
			3.9.1.5 Range
			3.9.1.6 Variance
			3.9.1.7 Standard deviation
	3.10 EXPLORATORY FACTOR ANALYSIS
		3.10.1 Principle component analysis
		3.10.2 Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO)
	3.11 RELIABILITY
	3.12 VALIDITY
	3.13 TEST OF SIGNIFICANCE
		3.13.1 T-test
		3.13.2 ANOVA
		3.13.3 Practical significance
	3.14 CONCLUSION
4
	4.1 Introduction
	4.2 DATA GATHERING PROCESS
	4.3 PRELIMINARY DATA ANALYSIS
		4.3.1 Coding
		4.3.2 Tabulation
	4.4 DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS
		4.4.1 Step 1 – Brand identification
		4.4.2 Step 1 – Brand personality perceptions
	4.5 EXPLORATORY FACTOR ANALYSIS
	4.6 RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY
	4.7 TOP-OF-THE-MIND AWARENESS CONCERNING LUXURY SEDAN MOTOR VEHICLE BRANDS
	4.8 ASSESSMENT OF BRAND PERSONALITY PERCEPTIONS OF LUXURY SEDAN MOTOR VEHICLES
		4.8.1 Brand personality traits association with luxury sedans
		4.8.2 Brand personality traits association with each brand
		4.8.3 Significance testing: Brand personality dimensions
		4.8.4 Hypothesis testing: Comparing the male and female respondents’ with regard to brand personality trait perceptions
	4.9 ASSESSMENT OF PURCHASING INTENTIONS OF LUXURY SEDAN MOTOR VEHICLES
		4.9.1 Purchasing intentions of luxury sedans
		4.9.2 Purchasing intentions of each of the brands
		4.9.3 Significance testing: Purchasing intentions
		4.9.4 Hypothesis testing: Comparing the male and female respondents’ with regard to purchasing intentions.
	4.10 CONCLUSION
5
	5.1 Introduction
	5.2 OVERVIEW OF THE STUDY
	5.3 MAIN FINDINGS
	5.4 CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE STUDY
	5.5 RECOMMENDATIONS
	5.6 FUTURE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES
	5.7 CONCLUDING REMARKS
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

BRAND PERSONALITY PERCEPTIONS OF
LUXURY SEDAN MOTOR VEHICLES AMONGST
THE SOUTH AFRICAN GENERATION Y COHORT



Philasande Sokhela

Student number: 22381937


Dissertation submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree

MASTER OF COMMERCE

in the discipline of

Marketing Management

in the

FACULTY OF ECONOMIC SCIENCES AND INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY

at the

NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY

VAAL TRIANGLE CAMPUS



Supervisor: Mr R. Müller
Co-supervisor: Prof. A.L Bevan-Dye
2015

Page 2

DECLARATION

I, Philasande Sokhela declare that BRAND PERSONALITY PERCEPTIONS OF
LUXURY SEDAN MOTOR VEHICLES AMONGST THE SOUTH AFRICAN

GENERATION Y COHORT is my own work and that all the sources I have used or quoted

have been indicated and acknowledged by means of complete references.

Signature: _____________________________

Date: _____________________________

ii

05/03/2015

Page 63

Figure 4.5: Gender distribution (Step 2)

The female students accounted for more than half of the sample, 56 per cent. The male

counterpart accounted for 44 per cent of the sample participants. This gender distribution

is sufficiently representative to draw comparisons between male and female participants.

The ethnic group of the population is outlined in the next figure.



Figure 4.6: Ethnic group distribution (Step 2)

As evident from Figure 4.6, the African/Black ethnic group accounted for more than 70

per cent of the total target population. The following ethnic group was White participants

that accounted for 24 per cent. The other 3 per cent constituted of Coloured and

Asian/Indian participants. Figure 4.7 indicates the mother tongue of the participants.

Male
44%

Female
56%

African/Black
73%

Asian/Indian
1%

Coloured
2%

White
24%

Chapter 4: Data analysis and interpretation 49

Page 64

Figure 4.7: Mother tongue

The mother tongue of the participants was also taken into account. The largest group of

the population sample was Sotho speaking (26%). Afrikaans was another popular

language among the participants and accounted for 24 per cent. IsiZulu also prevailed as

a one of the dominant languages among the participants, accounting for 10 per cent of

the population sample. The other 40 per cent was consisting of Sepedi, Setswana,

Tshivenda, IsiXhosa, English, isiNdebele, SiSwati and Xitsonga. This language

distribution reflects an input from all the 11 official languages of South Africa.

There were age gaps and differences between participants that are illustrated in Figure

4.8.

Afikaans
24%

English
5%

Isindebele
1%

IsiXhosa
6% Isizulu

10%
Sesotho

26%

Sepedi
8%

Setswana
9%

Siswati
2%Tshivenda

5%
Xitsonga

4%

Mother Tongue

Chapter 4: Data analysis and interpretation 50

Page 126

Attribute

Not

descriptive

Slightly

descriptive Neutral Descriptive

Extremely

descriptive

Real 23 69 211 351 588

Wholesome 32 93 341 447 329

Cheerful 42 91 282 372 455

Sentimental 31 90 324 420 377

Friendly 46 83 297 337 479

Original 27 47 189 280 699

Reliable 17 46 201 351 627

Hard-working 21 49 234 390 548

Secure 14 49 195 400 584

Intelligent 16 35 187 322 682

Technical 21 46 199 381 595

Corporate 13 38 270 447 474

Successful 14 36 156 303 733

Leader 30 69 219 382 542

Confident 23 42 164 301 712

daring 36 81 279 420 426

trendy 16 54 240 394 538

Exciting 28 56 205 330 623

Spirited 27 70 255 451 439

Cool 41 68 198 293 642

Young 143 125 256 296 425

Imaginative 24 82 257 422 457

Unique 26 71 254 336 555

Up-to-date 18 35 166 362 661

Appendices 112

Page 127

Attribute

Not

descriptive

Slightly

descriptive Neutral Descriptive

Extremely

descriptive

Independent 24 45 188 350 635

Contemporary 36 73 323 452 358

Upper class 19 55 176 334 658

Glamorous 12 47 220 366 597

Good looking 14 42 151 332 703

Charming 29 49 178 335 651

Feminine 115 113 342 340 332

Smooth 27 56 251 415 493

Outdoorsy 102 149 321 354 316

Masculine 45 74 315 378 430

Western 81 74 261 340 486

Tough 73 104 300 344 421

Rugged 88 154 335 426 239

Purchasing intentions

Like to buy 1 91 113 238 276

Plan on buying 2 183 135 236 223

First choice brand 6 192 156 244 227

Positive things 2 91 110 249 292

Recommend 6 96 106 248 324

Encourage

friends 3 91 112 272 315

Only this brand 10 208 148 252 239



Appendices 113

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