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TitleBetween Person and Person: Dialogical Pedagogy in Authentic Leadership Development
LanguageEnglish
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Page 1

Dialogical Pedagogy in Authentic Leadership


1

Between Person and Person:
Dialogical Pedagogy in Authentic Leadership

Development



Izhak Berkovich


School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel


Abstract

This paper is a critique of the dominant functionalist discourse in authentic leadership

theory, which shapes the manner in which we perceive authentic leadership

development. As an alternative, I offer adopting dialogical philosophy as a theoretical

lens for conceptualizing authentic leadership development. Drawing on various

dialogical communication works, I explore how dialogical pedagogy can be used to

improve authentic leadership development. I suggest eight components of dialogical

pedagogy that can be adopted in authentic leadership development: self-exposure,

open-mindedness, empathy, care, respect, critical thinking, contact, and mutuality.

The advantages, limitations, and implications of dialogical pedagogy for authentic

leadership development are then discussed.




Published in Academy of Management Learning and Education, 13(2), 245-264.

DOI: 10.5465/amle.2012.0367

Page 20

Dialogical Pedagogy in Authentic Leadership


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feelings of connection of intimate partners are highly correlated (Weigel, 2010).

Contact also helps express critical thinking because it makes it easier to confront the

partner, destabilizing the partner’s basic assumptions.

I suggest that the eight interrelated components of dialogical pedagogy can

enable the development of authentic leaders. Using a facilitator of dialogical

pedagogy is expected to stimulate dialogical attitudes and behaviors on the part of the

individual being developed as well (Figure 2).



Figure 2. Example of Application of Dialogical Pedagogy in Dyadic Interaction


Facilitator Developed individual

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1st interval


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2nd interval


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3rd interval


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4th interval



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For example, in a new mentoring relationship a facilitator may choose to disclose

details about a personal disempowering event that influenced him or her life. Hearing

about the disempowering event, the individual being developed may experience some

level of caring and intimacy with the facilitator. Moreover, the facilitator’s self-

exposure legitimizes the self-exposure of the individual being developed. If the latter

chooses to expose an event related to him or her self, the facilitator may use

conscientization to shed light on the role played by contextual and social constrains in

the event. The individual being developed may automatically reject this interpretation.

In response, the facilitator may ask the individual being developed to explore the roots

Self-exposure Care and

contact

Care

Self-exposure Critical

thinking

Open-

mindedness

Empathy

Open-

mindedness

and critical

thinking

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